Author Topic: Gluing Formica onto a disk  (Read 416 times)

ebalared

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Re: Gluing Formica onto a disk
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2018, 09:38:33 PM »
Quote
Make the seam angled instead of 90 degrees and fit it dry.  When gluing it down any glue thickness will be taken up by sliding the angled joint..
Ed

Wouldn't that method require that up to 1/16" (assuming a 45º angle and up to 0.010" glue gap) or so be allowed on both sides of the disk for final trimming?

Paul Melo

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Re: Gluing Formica onto a disk
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2018, 08:07:49 PM »
Yes it would need some amount on each side for trimming.

Ed

grateganir

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Re: Gluing Formica onto a disk
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2018, 12:08:26 AM »
On mine I left a 3-4 mm gap at the join , it looks neat & it would not be effected if the material it's stuck to expand & contract.

longtichaten

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Re: Gluing Formica onto a disk
« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2018, 11:26:24 AM »
Using a number of the suggestions above, I glued the Formica strips to the disk edges today. Thanks again to everyone who helped out.

I went with a straight joint ends for the strips because I had already trimmed them fairly close to meeting. Using an angled joint would have required more length, so I went with what I had already started.

The tip for heating the strips really worked well. I found a round cutout opening in the scrap pile, and curled the Formica inside. It was very easy to heat it up and watch it start conforming to the inside shape. When cool it retained the curve imparted by the heat. The diameter of the opening was larger than the disks I am using, but I'm sure that it helped anyway.
With the application of heat from a hobby-grade heat gun, the strip relaxed and fit the ID nicely. It happened right before your eyes...
Next, I cobbled together a jig for guiding the strips to the disk edges, and to elevate the disk slightly above the surface. A transfer punch was used to align the disk, a 1/4" plywood support underneath to lift the disk a bit, through peg board that provided a resting surface for the bottom edge of the strip (to prevent mis-aligning the strip with the disk edge), and finally into a conveniently existing hole in my MDF "workbench" surface.
I used a stubby foam roller to apply glue to the strips and to the disk edges...
As suggested earlier, I left the last 2" of the disk unglued to allow for careful trimming of the strip's edge.
I trimmed within 1/16" using some heavy shop scissors, then used a hand plane, and finally a new, unused file to get a very close fit where the Formica met. When the fit was looking good, I used a small acid brush to add glue to the remaining part of the disk edge, and tacked it all down. In the picture below, the gluing is done, and the disks are awaiting flush trimming of the excess Formica from their faces.
I took these to the router table for a preliminary flush trim. The router makes a very, very clean cut in Formica as I expected. I'll finish the final trimming later. I might use the file or sandpaper to do it.
And here's how the joint looks...