Author Topic: Tube End Covers for Hasting Tube?  (Read 204 times)

ovhercayvic

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Re: Tube End Covers for Hasting Tube?
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2018, 11:54:48 AM »
Chuck, I did not realize they made a catalyzed hammertone paint. Any recollection of what brand? Finish looks great.

James Clayton

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Re: Tube End Covers for Hasting Tube?
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2018, 06:29:54 PM »
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I have a good bit of fiberglass and CF cloth and resin - so I may give this a try. I doubt they will be as pretty as yours. When it comes out of the mold what do you use to trim it with?

Thanks


Pat, to trim off the "flange", I use a 2" diameter diamond wheel, in a trim router. I mold them with an extra 3/8" depth for cut-off purposes. The inside, unfinished surface is cleaned-up with a DA sander on the flat, and the inner cylinder is cleaned-up with a barrel-sander on the drill press. Careful application of the layup results in minimal clean-up sanding.

I've been in the composites business for decades, so it's minimal work for me.
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Chuck, I did not realize they made a catalyzed hammertone paint. Any recollection of what brand? Finish looks great.


Thanks!

It's not a hammertone paint, but a regular gloss. A base coat is applied, and allowed to surface "flash". Not cure completely. Then the paint gun is re-adjusted with no fan and minimal tank pressure, allowing me to apply the texture over the "flashed" base coat. Again, a skill I picked up in my decades in the industry. A practice board is used to make sure the texture size is where I want it before hitting the work piece. Can be done with just about any paint, but you have to know the cure time of the paint mix, and time it right. If you apply the texture too soon, it melts into the base coat and disappears. Apply it too late, and it doesn't fuse with the basecoat properly, leaving more of a pebbled finish.