Author Topic: $ eye pieces  (Read 1450 times)

Rob Freeman

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$ eye pieces
« on: December 27, 2017, 09:41:10 PM »
I'm getting a lot of information on eye pieces for my se 8. Thanks !Everyone is right about wantingmore stuff. I want to do it right the first time on eye pieces. Not sure about my limits on lens. How high or low. I would like to get a good set of lens and filters that I can use with this and other scopes I may get in the future. So far I've read thatyou don't want anything higher than 70 degrees. 68 degrees seems fine. Thinking of going with Explore sciencelens. 31mm 85 degree. But rule of thumb says not over 70 degrees.Thinking a15mm 68 degree 5.5 mm 68 degree. Can buy singles if best. Maybe a Pentex.Waiting to get my scope to see what's what with the Celestron package lens first. But it would be nice to hear what others withthe se 8 scopethink first. I want at least 3 good lens and a couple of nice filters. Also thinking ofonesun eyepiece and filter. Camera will be way later on.So let me here your thoughts. Please.



chirafepes

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2017, 12:54:47 AM »
Hey neighbor, hows it going.
You are venturing down a confusing path
I don't know about the below 70 degree thing.
You are most likely to get a plossl EP with the scope.
Take your time and make your choices based on what you want to look at.

ES68 24mm is a good EP for the money.
If you can, go with TV Delos EPs they are also great.
5.5 mm might be a lot of power. I think it would be around 400X.
Thats a lot of power, you would need good seeing if you are looking at a planet.

Good luck, you found the right web site for answers.

larterpchaka

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2017, 12:33:30 AM »
I don't have an SE8 so you may wish to ignore this. I would recommend a zoom. My zoom eyepiece is my most used eyepiece.

I have the Celestron 8-24 and I like it very much.

If youare looking at ES as your benchmark for eyepieces than I would recommend the Baader Hyperion Mark-III Clickstop Zoom Eyepiece 8-24mm. Wider FOV than my Celestron and it gets rave reviews. - $289
http://agenaastro.co...m-eyepiece.html

One eyepiece gives you about 85X to about 255X and everything in betweenin your scope. That is aboutall the range you need for most viewing sessions.

I would focus your initial single eyepiece purchases at the lower power wide field end for now, below that 80Xmark. and use the zoom for the rest. You can fill in with single eyepieces at the FL that you tend to work with most often, I have. But I find I use the zoom most of the time.

Again, I don't have your scope so feel free to ignore the suggestion.

Derek Vail

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2017, 04:06:13 AM »
Hold off on eyepieces for now. Play with the 25mm plossl that comes with the scope, then decide what to do for additional eyepieces.

If you just must get something now, that celestron 24-8 zoom is appropriate and is also available rebranded from orion for less.

For the moon and planets, I like a binoviewer with something around 20mm eyepieces and a barlow available to get it to 10mm equivalent.

Wider field is generally considered "better" and is certainly more $$. ES 68* and 82* are good choices, but I recommend holding off until you've used the scope some. If you just *must* buy something now, something around 10mm will give you 200x and a 1mm exit pupil. Or something around 15mm and a barlow.

Or just get a decent barlow. You'll certainly want one at some point in any event, and it'll go well with the 25mm plossl in the meantime.

Guy Cleveland

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2017, 10:46:39 PM »
The Explore Scientific eyepiece you mentioned is 30mm and has an 82 degree AFOV. It's a fine eyepiece but is rather heavy. The ES 34mm 68 degree AFOV eyepiece weighs less, is less expensive, and is a good choice as an alternative. It is currently on sale at Astronomics.

https://www.astronom...ece_p20162.aspx

Since an SCT is a "slow" telescope with a high focal ratio, well-corrected eyepieces such as the two ES oculars mentioned previously are not necessary. There are a number of 5-lens-element Erfle/Erfle variants that will work well in your Celestron.

http://explorescient...0-30mm-eyepiece

However, they are not recommended for "fast" telescopes.

https://www.astronom...al-ratio_t.aspx

A 2" 40mm 70 degree AFOV eypiece or a 2" 55mm Plössl will provide the largest true field of view possible with a 2" focuser.

Eyepiece designs are discussed at the following URLs:

http://www.handprint.../ASTRO/ae5.html

http://www.nightskyinfo.com/eyepieces/

http://www.quadibloc...ience/opt04.htm

Dave Mitsky

Daniel Ross

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2018, 04:38:36 AM »
Quote
I would focus your initial single eyepiece purchases at the lower power wide field end for now, below that 80Xmark. and use the zoom for the rest. You can fill in with single eyepieces at the FL that you tend to work with most often, I have. But I find I use the zoom most of the time.
This is the exact approach I've taken since getting my first scope a couple of months ago. I use the Celestron 8-24 zoom ($58) and the ES24/68 ($100 used), and right now I am all set for the foreseeable future.

bardersgarli

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2018, 10:59:00 PM »
You both gave me a lot of great advice. I didn't think of weight or speed. Anda goodclick model might be good for starters. Logged everything in my book. Thanks Dave and Aea -JR. I want to start slow until I know what's up. I was looking at the click and zoom. But though it might be new on the market. Haven't read much on it. I want what we all want. A great deal on good stuff that lasts. Then I can build off that.It's that time of year for deals. I need to keep reading on equipment and reviews. Different people. Different reviews.Like Binoculars sound interesting. Or are they called Bio viewers? Maybe start with [Binoculars] and aclick stop. When I'm ready. I'm starting to feel better about things as I go thanks to the help I'm getting. It's big money. ButI'm glade I went with a new scope. IJust need to make sure my set up goes right. I got a new scope package deal without star sense. Then added star sense to it.Sounds like you just plug itin and hit a button totake a picture. The more pictures. The better it gets for setting up.So I'm hoping everything goes smooth. I'm sure it will. Thanks again. Your always their AeA. Thanks

tidutamar

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 02:21:10 PM »
I would not go hog wild on eyepieces right now. I would buy a 32mm 1.25" plossl. This will give you the widest possible true field of view with a 1.25"
eyepiece. I use mine everyday all the time. Once I get something in the finder, I pop this eyepiece in to get the item into my scope's field of view.
Also, this is nice for viewing big things like the pleiades, orion nebula, double cluster etc.

If you buy one more eyepiece I might get a 10mm plossl. This would give you a nice high power option.

Once you see what these can do you can branch out to other pieces, wide fields etc.

The zoom recommendation is a good one too. If you do this skip buying the 10mm I mentioned.

If you buy good used pieces, you can sell these later for about what you paid.
These will not break the bank either, you could keep them as sprares.

skelevchasul

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2018, 02:09:35 AM »
Some resources you might find helpful.zoom eyepiece review
http://www.chuckhawk...m_eyepieces.htm

Baader Zoom Vs Fixed Eyepieces - This will open your eyes
If you want to go less expensive the Celestron is great at $60
http://www.cloudynig...m-vs-fixed-eps/Eyepiece Designs - This is the one I turn to when I am trying to understand or explain the
differences between the various designs. There are many different designs, Many are named
for their original designer, such as Huyghens, Ramsden, Kellner, Plossl, Konig, Erfle, Branden and Nagler.
http://www.chuckhawk...ece_designs.htm

Tim Massey

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2018, 07:31:46 AM »
The 70 degree bit comes (If true) from the eye, it will pick up about a 70 degree field without you moving it. So if wider you sort of have to look over in whatever direction. Which is I think more a bit of information more then anything as people are generally moving their eye around all the time.

If you are talking of 68 degree eyepieces then they will be fine but 68 usually means ES and the ES82's are about the same cost. And I doubt that whatever you point the scope at will be against one edge of the eyepiece but in the centre so maybe the 82's - you are going to lose nothing. Well there is one loss.

What I see is that you may get a 24mm ES68 but only a 14mm ES82. By the time you take magnification into account the field you see is reduced. So you may not gain any field by getting the "wider" eyepieces. Working each option out is a pain so make yourself a small sprreadsheet and feed the number in for the scope and the eyepieces.

I think the "widest" field I could realistically get was with an Antares W70 25mm eyepiece. That just managed to deliver a bit more then anything. At least in 1.25mm eyepieces and sensible costs+availability.

Ryan Chaudhari

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2018, 08:28:09 AM »
Quote
But rule of thumb says not over 70 degrees.


Not sure where that rule of thumb comes from, never heard of it before. I prefer Naglers over the narrower fields of view, but tastes vary.

Tom Doyle

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2018, 06:12:41 PM »
I don't know where you heard nothing more than 70 degrees. People enjoy views from eyepieces in the range of 40 to 110 degrees. I like 70 AVOV Delos for planetary, and Ethos for super wide views. I agree that ES eyepieces give excellent value for the money. I like TeleVue Plossls for under $100 dollar, excellent quality eyepieces. I recommend going to a star party and look through a variety of eyepieces in a variety of telescopes. Look at a variety of sky objects, and you will get a much better feel for the eyepieces you will want to purchase.

Adam Rice

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2018, 06:18:14 PM »
Quote
Some resources you might find helpful.zoom eyepiece reviewhttp://www.chuckhawk...m_eyepieces.htm

Baader Zoom Vs Fixed Eyepieces - This will open your eyes
If you want to go less expensive the Celestron is great at $60
http://www.cloudynig...m-vs-fixed-eps/Eyepiece Designs - This is the one I turn to when I am trying to understand or explain the
differences between the various designs. There are many different designs, Many are named
for their original designer, such as Huyghens, Ramsden, Kellner, Plossl, Konig, Erfle, Branden and Nagler.http://www.chuckhawk...ece_designs.htm

H.T.Giving! Just wanted to say thanks Aea jrfor the above Info.I was thinking of gettingusedsingle eye's piece sets until I read the above. I'mpumped andgoing to order the Baader zoom zoomtomorrow. From what I read. Why not get one! It will be here about the time my scopesbattery ischarged. Ha Ha. Great Info.

Ricky Mondal

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2018, 07:59:28 PM »
Please be sure to post a report of your experiecne with the Baader zoom.

Eric Ayyagari

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2018, 12:33:50 AM »
Quote
I want to do it right the first time on eye pieces.

The different positives and negatives with the variety of eyepieces availably makes it pretty close to impossible for anyone to guarantee this for you. We can only give what we believe to be the most likely best choices. There is really nothing inherently wrong with very wide or very narrow field of view eyepieces. A middle ground is not a bad choice either.
The only truly bad mistake you can make is too high of magnification. Even then, if you accept the fact that it will only be useable for a couple days a year, it's not really a mistake either.
I can't enter into specific eyepieces because I've never even looked through an 8" cat. It is also dependent on which objects you wish to view (I recommend enjoying everything!). I would agree that an eyepiece providing the widest true field of view (Not the same as apparent field of view) is a good place to start.
If I'm right, the 25mm gives about 80x. Not bad. Could certainly use more power too. Somewhere around 140x, 200x, and 300x are my suggestions.
But, back to the part of your post I quoted. I think there are only three ways to achieve the stated goal. One is to conduct exhaustive research  until you know which eyepieces will satisfy you for all time. The second is to get lucky and happen make a good decision right off. The third works for me; choose to be happy with the eyepieces you end up with.