Author Topic: $ eye pieces  (Read 136 times)

Jimmy Harbaugh

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2018, 01:03:32 AM »
Take a look at the Paradigm Dual ED or Agena Starguider eyepieces. Both brands are the same eyepieces just different brand names. They a 60° FOV and do an excellent job in a F10 SCT scope. I have 5 of the Paradigm and they are great in my Meade LS8 and C9.25 SCTs. They are easy on the budget also, an important factor when you're just starting out. You can pick them up used for an excellent price, although the new price is only about $60.00.

John Daniels

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2018, 11:33:07 PM »
There is one more piece of equipment that may be as or more important than the rest. Its called YOU. That is, developing your skills, striving to learn to read the night sky like a road map, developing your skills at observing and detecting detail in the objects you are observing, training your eye and brain...we are in an ongoing school in this hobby. I read all this stuff about all these big ticket eyepieces like they are some sort of magic bullets. You are going to see objects just as well and just as much detail from good quality but more modest priced eyepieces, but you may not have as wide a field of view or as much eye relief. It's not just the scope; the person behind the eyepiece is just as important.It seems like most of what I read on this forum is equipment, equipment, equipment, like that's the answer to enjoying this hobby.I run into people regularly at my dark sky site who have spent lots of money on nice scopes, eyepieces and equipment, but they act like they don't know how to find a thing. And if you ask them what they have been observing, they will just shy away from you. Sometimes I think this hobby has become more about equipment than about finding and observing objects in the night sky.

Patrick Zhu

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2018, 01:23:35 AM »
Thethe Paradigm Dual ED and Agena Starguider eyepieces are certainly good buys. They offer a 60 degree AFOV and enhanced eye relief, as do the Celestron X-Cel LX and Meade HD-60 lines.When it comes to zoom eyepieces, the Baader Planetarium Hyperion Mark III is one of the better ones. It's been on the market for some time and quite a few people like them very much. I happen to own one and it certainly gets some use, particularly for solar observing and "quick looks" from my red-zone front yard at night.You may find this user review useful:http://www.weasner.c...iece/index.htmlDave Mitsky

bayretide

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2018, 01:38:48 AM »
I am not sure what the OP's plans are for low power/wide field or what the current eyepieces are. The major decision with an 8"SCT is whether to stick with 1.25" and a focal reducer if one wants to maximize field, or go to 2" for low power views. Both have their pro's and con's and might even be impacted by the specifics of the style of mount.

Reaching the lower power/max field isn'tsomething the Baader zoom (or any of the zooms)will excel at since it's maximum field stop is only 20.1mm per their specs (48 degrees). With an 8" SCT this would work out to 0.57 deg. true field without a focal reducer. The focal reducer would boost it to 0.9 degreesof true fieldand provide a reasonable 3.8mm exit pupil.

Michael Dinelli

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2018, 02:04:56 AM »
It's really hard to give advice about eyepieces, because eyepieces are very personal things. Much like a pair of shoes -- you wouldn't necessarily expect shoes that fit one person perfectly to be even close to acceptable for another person. By far your best bet would be to go to a star party or a regular viewing session of the astronomy club closest to you, look through as many scopes as possible, and ask questions about the eyepieces. Or if you're lucky enough to live close to one of the few surviving brick-and-mortar telescope stores, by all means visit one.

I prefer eyepieces with apparent fields of view of 70 degrees or less. I am certainly not alone in that, but I do think that I'm in a minority; most people prefer apparent fields of view from 80 to 110 degrees. The only way to know how you will feel about eyepieces with different apparent fields of view is to try them.

I like eyepiece with relatively long eye relief, about 20 mm. Many people agree, but a fair number prefer eyepieces with shorter eye relief. (Eye relief is how far you hold your eye from the glass.) Even given two eyepieces with identical specifications, I often find that I much prefer one eyepiece to the other for reasons that are hard to explain.

I do agree that playing around with whatever eyepiece or eyepieces you already own is a good first step.

loraderclot

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2018, 05:11:19 AM »
Don't worry too much about "getting it exactly right" the first time. Your tastes and your needs will change over time, depending on the scopes you use, your preferences for viewing, comfort level with glasses, or without. And your budget, of course.

The best advice I ever got was to start with eyepieces in the 65-70 degree FOV range that provide magnification of about 70x, 140x, and 210x.  I started with only three, as above, and added a few more as time passed. Very high magnification (over 250x) is rarely needed, due to light pollution and atmospheric conditions.

Edit: others already mentioned eye relief, or ER. I also strongly prefer ER in the 15-20mm range. Far easier on my eyes...

c/s,

Bilal Luck

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2018, 05:52:38 AM »
A couple of things to think about:

When I observe with a given scope on a given night, I use three to five eye pieces. I have way more than five eye pieces, but I have more than one scope. If you're only going to have one scope for a while, you probably won't need more that a handful of eye pieces. The case for zooms is pretty strong.

You C8 is f/10, a focal ratio that is forgiving of simple eye piece designs. Orthos and Plossls will work well for the narrow (40-52 degree) field of view eye pieces. I have the three Orion Optiluxe eye pieces (I think erfles, up to 62 degree AFOV) that work well in slow scopes, but are awful in fast (f/4- f/5) scopes. The expensive glass (Panoptics, Naglers, ES68s, ES82s, Pentax XW, etc.) are made to work and play well with fast main optics. In some respects those fancy eye pieces are overkill with slow optics.

I can see almost the entire field in an 82 degree eye piece without moving my head around, and sometimes I like having a field that wide. Similarly, I can't see the entire field of a 100 degree eye piece, and since I don't like moving my head around, I don't use Ethos or ES100 eye pieces. My attitude would be different, I think, if I didn't use a driven/ tracking mount. There are lots and lots of objects that, to me, don't really benefit from awide field of view. I'm perfectly happy to view planets and galaxies with Plossls. Big nebulae and open clusters benefit from wide eye pieces. Sometimes I like to view globular clusters with a wide field eye piece to enhance the compactness of the object.

Lauro Mason

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #22 on: January 20, 2018, 08:30:06 PM »
I'm sure I'll get a few brickbats, just hopefully no bricks:

Check your old college or high school physics textbook. The eyepiece's job is to blow up the image already formed by the objective lens (or mirror, depending on your type of telescope). It's a (fancy) magnifying glass.
Okay, granted, some magnifiers are better than others, but I think the actual differences might be smaller than one might expect.

I saw two pieces of good advice here so far, one from Tony Flanders, that eyepiece preferences can get very personal, like shoes (!!), and vtornado, to not go crazy on eyepieces for now. Take your time and feel it out to see what you really want and like.

biocaunico

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #23 on: January 20, 2018, 10:45:39 PM »
With eyepieces it is nearly impossible to get exactly what you will want long term on your first try (unless you already have experience with a wide assortment of types and know your preferences.) I started with a good Plossl set long ago, then tried a wide field (predecessor to Panoptic) before trying a Nagler. For me the Nagler width field became the standard with Panoptic and Plossl fields reserved for specific purposes and niches. Others now do the same butwith Ethos type fieldwhile some prefer Panoptic field widths. And there are a few that find field past that of a Plossl distracting, and employ Barlows' to keep the eye relief comfortable when shorter focal lengths are required. None of these are wrong answers, it is a matter of preference. Each will often require some compromises on the ends of the focal length range--a single type can rarely do it all.

Jason Meyer

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2018, 05:41:18 AM »
$ eyepieces lead to $$ eyepieces, which lead to $$$ eyepieces.....then the aperture bug takes over...or even worse, the AP bug.

At least thats my experience.....luckily funding stopped me before the AP bug bit.

tecretalhei

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2018, 08:48:05 AM »
Quote
There is one more piece of equipment that may be as or more important than the rest. Its called YOU. That is, developing your skills, striving to learn to read the night sky like a road map, developing your skills at observing and detecting detail in the objects you are observing, training your eye and brain...we are in an ongoing school in this hobby. I read all this stuff about all these big ticket eyepieces like they are some sort of magic bullets. You are going to see objects just as well and just as much detail from good quality but more modest priced eyepieces, but you may not have as wide a field of view or as much eye relief. It's not just the scope; the person behind the eyepiece is just as important.
It seems like most of what I read on this forum is equipment, equipment, equipment, like that's the answer to enjoying this hobby.
I run into people regularly at my dark sky site who have spent lots of money on nice scopes, eyepieces and equipment, but they act like they don't know how to find a thing. And if you ask them what they have been observing, they will just shy away from you. Sometimes I think this hobby has become more about equipment than about finding and observing objects in the night sky.

Your right in what you say. Equipment is just part of the game. But until I know what I'm doing. I need to hear from others. If you can afford it. Why not go for the best.Less problems. Plus when you sell. Who doesn't want a buy a good used lens. If theyhave the best and don't know what's what. Who cares. Their enjoy what they have. I can't even say some of the planets names. Ha HaIt's all about the best view for the money you can spend.I've been reading till my head spins. Being new isn't easy. I don't know abbreviations or don't know half of what people are talking about. No clubs here.I'm new to everything. I will enjoy this hobby and share what I learn and enjoy it.But I want to be able to see things with clear detail and start out with half way good stuff. I don't need the best. Only good.One thing is. I need to find some stuff out myself. I'm at that point now.I hear rule of thumb is this. What am I to believe. I'm not going to take a chance and wast money.Or wonder how much high power I can use. I get a new scopewith 480 mag. But then you can't use all of that mag unless its a perfect day. So much to learn.Everyone has taken time out to teach me. Right or wrong. I been reading about light coming thru this or lightbeing on inner edges of cheep lens, or eye relief thisetc. Sounds like perfection to me. You can learn from that.I read what's being said and your right aboutwhat you say. But when someone shows me proof to back up what they say. And it's what I'm looking for to start out with.To me, It says a lot. I take things with a grain of salt.But learn from it. Theirs more to learn than I thought. I read about different lens and how they work.For me. Agood scope and lens are what you want to start out with.Maybe zooms with bethe future. For me the Baader zoom seems the right place to start. Next are filters for the sun.I ordered the zoom. Now I can compare my lens that came with my scope with the zoom. I now can just sit and enjoy my scope with a nice zoom lens for awhile. No filing threw lens or filterswhile trying to view planets. I canget comfortable with everything around me.

John Fimbres

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2018, 08:55:33 AM »
Quote
It's really hard to give advice about eyepieces, because eyepieces are very personal things. Much like a pair of shoes -- you wouldn't necessarily expect shoes that fit one person perfectly to be even close to acceptable for another person. By far your best bet would be to go to a star party or a regular viewing session of the astronomy club closest to you, look through as many scopes as possible, and ask questions about the eyepieces. Or if you're lucky enough to live close to one of the few surviving brick-and-mortar telescope stores, by all means visit one.

I prefer eyepieces with apparent fields of view of 70 degrees or less. I am certainly not alone in that, but I do think that I'm in a minority; most people prefer apparent fields of view from 80 to 110 degrees. The only way to know how you will feel about eyepieces with different apparent fields of view is to try them.

I like eyepiece with relatively long eye relief, about 20 mm. Many people agree, but a fair number prefer eyepieces with shorter eye relief. (Eye relief is how far you hold your eye from the glass.) Even given two eyepieces with identical specifications, I often find that I much prefer one eyepiece to the other for reasons that are hard to explain.

I do agree that playing around with whatever eyepiece or eyepieces you already own is a good first step.

No party's here!! I'm learning on the fly. But I'll take a old pair of your shoes. Ha Ha I'm looking for information. I believe I got a good start and can get comfortable with my scope and a zoom. Maybe one low and one high len's later. But a good sun filter might be next. Then I can see what I'm doing with my scope in the day time while learning my new scopes key board. Thanks

massgisttesci

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2018, 08:40:16 PM »
Quote
I am not sure what the OP's plans are for low power/wide field or what the current eyepieces are. The major decision with an 8"SCT is whether to stick with 1.25" and a focal reducer if one wants to maximize field, or go to 2" for low power views. Both have their pro's and con's and might even be impacted by the specifics of the style of mount.

Reaching the lower power/max field isn'tsomething the Baader zoom (or any of the zooms)will excel at since it's maximum field stop is only 20.1mm per their specs (48 degrees). With an 8" SCT this would work out to 0.57 deg. true field without a focal reducer. The focal reducer would boost it to 0.9 degreesof true fieldand provide a reasonable 3.8mm exit pupil.

I was looking at a few extra's when I got my scope. A reducer was one of them witha bigger field eye piece. But I'm waiting. I have a lens set also that came with my scope. But the zoom. I can just sit and not worry about changing lens or filters as much. I'll be fumbling aroundas it is with my new scope. A sun filter is next. Then I can play in sun light with my scope and learn the key board better.I'm all set until I get comfortable with what I have.But thanks for the tip on two inch eye piece for low power. I'll remember that.Later I might want a lower power eye piece and one high power. So much to learn. But am at it every day. Things are coming into place. Thanks you .

Lawrence Paez

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2018, 10:03:28 PM »
Quote
Thethe Paradigm Dual ED and Agena Starguider eyepieces are certainly good buys. They offer a 60 degree AFOV and enhanced eye relief, as do the Celestron X-Cel LX and Meade HD-60 lines.

When it comes to zoom eyepieces, the Baader Planetarium Hyperion Mark III is one of the better ones. It's been on the market for some time and quite a few people like them very much. I happen to own one and it certainly gets some use, particularly for solar observing and "quick looks" from my red-zone front yard at night.

You may find this user review useful:http://www.weasner.c...iece/index.html

Dave Mitsky

The only read one bad thing about thezoom. The zoomgets stuck when its cold out. Being new to everything. I can now just sit without changing lens or filters as much. A sun filter is next. Play in day light.

John Fletcher

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #29 on: January 22, 2018, 10:59:28 PM »
Quote
Hey neighbor, hows it going.
You are venturing down a confusing path
I don't know about the below 70 degree thing.
You are most likely to get a plossl EP with the scope.
Take your time and make your choices based on what you want to look at.

ES68 24mm is a good EP for the money.
If you can, go with TV Delos EPs they are also great.
5.5 mm might be a lot of power. I think it would be around 400X.
Thats a lot of power, you would need good seeing if you are looking at a planet.

Good luck, you found the right web site for answers.

Iread 480 was the max. That'swhen I was reading about gettingthis newscope. That was b-4 I got it. People then were telling me that I might only get 400 maxon a good day. Then I get my scope. It says 400 maxin this book that came with the scope. So I'm thinking. Stay away for anything close to 400 max.A lot of people like the 24. I was thinking of one. But then the zoom came up. It's perfect for me for now. Just need a good sun filter so I can play in sun light.I need to learn my scope now with what I have. Then go from their. I got out the bug spray just in time. Ha Ha