Author Topic: $ eye pieces  (Read 390 times)

Christopher Bryant

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2018, 01:11:26 AM »
1) I've never heard any rule of thumb to stay away from eyepieces wider than 70 degrees.
2) I don't believe Explore Scientific makes a 31mm 85-degree eyepiece (did you mean the 30mm 82-degree?)

For an 8SE, I'd recommend the following for eyepieces:

Explore Scientific 24mm 68-degree
18mm, 12mm and 8mm Astro Tech Paradigm Dual ED (or Agena Astro Starguider Dual ED) or Meade HD-60
Celestron F/6.3 Focal Reducer/Corrector

With this set, you can stick to a 1.25 diagonal and still see pretty much anything an 8-inch SCT can show you.  With the Reducer/Corrector in place and the 24mm 68, you get a 1.2-degree field (about the same field you get with 30mm 82), but you save almost $200 and over a pound in payload. This is as big as a true field as you can get out of an 8-inch F/10 SCT without significant vignetting.  The R/C costs about the same as a 2-inch diagonal.

Take off the R/C and you have a nice medium-low power view with the 24mm 68.  Want a little more power? Switch to the 18mm.  And for planetary/high power viewing, you can pull out the 12mm or 8mm depending on subject and viewing conditions.

If you prefer, you can drop the 8mm and add a 2x barlow.

Jody Mukherjee

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2018, 03:27:28 PM »
I'm not the only one that really dislikes zooms, I just seem to be the one that says so. They get the AFOV completely wrong to my way of thinking. It's not difficult or terribly time consuming to swap ep's.
Isn't that scope equipped with a 1.25" focuser. If so a 32mm TV Plossl or ES68 24mm will give you the largest TFOV you'll get and that will become more important when you realize that wide FOV is your very fine scope's least capability. The larger exit pupil will like darker skies and probably work better with narrowband filters and the smaller exit pupil will give better mag and help darken light polluted skies.
I heartily concur with the suggestions above that the Astro-Tech Paradigm Dual ED and/or Agena Starguider Dual ED eyepieces are great matches for you scope and great buys. They are top performers at reasonable cost.
But the best advice above is just to go observe with the kit you get. Observing and only observing will make you a good observer and what comes in the box will show you more than you know how to see. Yes, it's a learned skill. Nothing you can buy will help as much as observing from under the darkest skies you can access will. But the great thing is that observing is a great teacher and the learning is big fun!

oh, yeah - That 70<sup>o</sup> thing's hogwash. What you like is what to use. I have ep's from 110 to 40<sup>o</sup> and they all are very useful.

rissubssimpsat

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2018, 03:50:08 PM »
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Hold off on eyepieces for now. Play with the 25mm plossl that comes with the scope, then decide what to do for additional eyepieces.

If you just must get something now, that celestron 24-8 zoom is appropriate and is also available rebranded from orion for less.

For the moon and planets, I like a binoviewer with something around 20mm eyepieces and a barlow available to get it to 10mm equivalent.

Wider field is generally considered "better" and is certainly more $$. ES 68* and 82* are good choices, but I recommend holding off until you've used the scope some. If you just *must* buy something now, something around 10mm will give you 200x and a 1mm exit pupil. Or something around 15mm and a barlow.

Or just get a decent barlow. You'll certainly want one at some point in any event, and it'll go well with the 25mm plossl in the meantime.

I'm doing what you said to do. Staying with what I have for now. I'mthinking ofgetting a sun filter.Then I can use to my scope in the day time for the sun and even the moon. That's it for awhile until I know what I'm doing. But if something comes along in the classified. It won't! I'll check it out. Was thinking around 7mm for what I have read. Maybe a really wide view 82 or higher. Now that I know my scope can use these high wide fields. But for now. I'm all set. It can be a pain trying to teach a new -b some times. So thanks for your time. I'll never learn it all. But I'm surprised theirs so must information.

teirazaro

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2018, 01:38:17 PM »
Quote
I'm not the only one that really dislikes zooms, I just seem to be the one that says so. They get the AFOV completely wrong to my way of thinking. It's not difficult or terribly time consuming to swap ep's.
Isn't that scope equipped with a 1.25" focuser. If so a 32mm TV Plossl or ES68 24mm will give you the largest TFOV you'll get and that will become more important when you realize that wide FOV is your very fine scope's least capability. The larger exit pupil will like darker skies and probably work better with narrowband filters and the smaller exit pupil will give better mag and help darken light polluted skies.
I heartily concur with the suggestions above that the Astro-Tech Paradigm Dual ED and/or Agena Starguider Duel ED eyepieces are great matches for you scope and great buys. They are top performers at reasonable cost.
But the best advice above is just to go observe with the kit you get. Observing and only observing will make you a good observer and what comes in the box will show you more than you know how to see. Yes, it's a learned skill. Nothing you can buy will help as much as observing from under the darkest skies you can access will. But the great thing is that observing is a great teacher and the learning is big fun!

oh, yeah - That 70<sup>o</sup> thing's hogwash. What you like is what to use. I have ep's from 110 to 40<sup>o</sup> and they all are very useful.

Agreed.

breadexgera

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2018, 10:38:49 PM »
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Thethe Paradigm Dual ED and Agena Starguider eyepieces are certainly good buys. They offer a 60 degree AFOV and enhanced eye relief, as do the Celestron X-Cel LX and Meade HD-60 lines.

When it comes to zoom eyepieces, the Baader Planetarium Hyperion Mark III is one of the better ones. It's been on the market for some time and quite a few people like them very much. I happen to own one and it certainly gets some use, particularly for solar observing and "quick looks" from my red-zone front yard at night.

You may find this user review useful:http://www.weasner.c...iece/index.html

Dave Mitsky

Nice review on the zoom eye piece. Thanks In my favorites.

acbanlota

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #35 on: January 31, 2018, 12:18:50 AM »
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$ eyepieces lead to $$ eyepieces, which lead to $$$ eyepieces.....then the aperture bug takes over...or even worse, the AP bug.

At least thats my experience.....luckily funding stopped me before the AP bug bit.

Ya I had to get out the can of raid to stop all the bugs! So many that it's over whelming.

Keith Dixon

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #36 on: January 31, 2018, 12:19:58 AM »
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There is one more piece of equipment that may be as or more important than the rest. Its called YOU. That is, developing your skills, striving to learn to read the night sky like a road map, developing your skills at observing and detecting detail in the objects you are observing, training your eye and brain...we are in an ongoing school in this hobby. I read all this stuff about all these big ticket eyepieces like they are some sort of magic bullets. You are going to see objects just as well and just as much detail from good quality but more modest priced eyepieces, but you may not have as wide a field of view or as much eye relief. It's not just the scope; the person behind the eyepiece is just as important.It seems like most of what I read on this forum is equipment, equipment, equipment, like that's the answer to enjoying this hobby.I run into people regularly at my dark sky site who have spent lots of money on nice scopes, eyepieces and equipment, but they act like they don't know how to find a thing. And if you ask them what they have been observing, they will just shy away from you. Sometimes I think this hobby has become more about equipment than about finding and observing objects in the night sky.
Your right in what you say. Equipment is just part of the game. But until I know what I'm doing. I need to hear from others. If you can afford it. Why not go for the best.Less problems. Plus when you sell. Who doesn't want a buy a good used lens. If theyhave the best and don't know what's what. Who cares. Their enjoy what they have. I can't even say some of the planets names. Ha HaIt's all about the best view for the money you can spend.I've been reading till my head spins. Being new isn't easy. I don't know abbreviations or don't know half of what people are talking about. No clubs here.I'm new to everything. I will enjoy this hobby and share what I learn and enjoy it.But I want to be able to see things with clear detail and start out with half way good stuff. I don't need the best. Only good.One thing is. I need to find some stuff out myself. I'm at that point now.I hear rule of thumb is this. What am I to believe. I'm not going to take a chance and wast money.Or wonder how much high power I can use. I get a new scopewith 480 mag. But then you can't use all of that mag unless its a perfect day. So much to learn.Everyone has taken time out to teach me. Right or wrong. I been reading about light coming thru this or lightbeing on inner edges of cheep lens, or eye relief thisetc. Sounds like perfection to me. You can learn from that.I read what's being said and your right aboutwhat you say. But when someone shows me proof to back up what they say. And it's what I'm looking for to start out with.To me, It says a lot. I take things with a grain of salt.But learn from it. Theirs more to learn than I thought. I read about different lens and how they work.For me. Agood scope and lens are what you want to start out with.Maybe zooms with bethe future. For me the Baader zoom seems the right place to start. Next are filters for the sun.I ordered the zoom. Now I can compare my lens that came with my scope with the zoom. I now can just sit and enjoy my scope with a nice zoom lens for awhile. No filing threw lens or filterswhile trying to view planets. I canget comfortable with everything around me.
Cavanaugh, I have been doing deep sky object observing/hunting for about 35 years. I stand by what I have stated.I've seen people who have spend all kinds of money on a nice 8" or 10" scopes, eyepieces, and other equipment and accessories. But they will come to our dark sky site, set up their scope, and then won't even use it. They will spend a perfectly clear night wandering around talking to (and annoying) other people, socializing and asking questions. Then, when they are done for the night they will pack up their scope and other accessories having never actually used their own scope--and I see this regularly. Go figure? There can be a variety of reasons for this, but I think this is at least partly due to people focusing on acquiring equipment instead of focusing on observing objects in the night sky--which should be their real objective. And yes, you can learn by asking questions, but you really learn observing by DOING it.Cavanaugh, you have told us all this equipment you want, but what about all the various objects you want to see in the night sky?Also, you mentioned all this equipment and accessories you want to get, but you didn't mention any kind of star charts or sky atlas you want to get. I think you'll find you need one.

Matt Marquez

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #37 on: January 31, 2018, 01:35:26 AM »
For an 8" SCT, I recommend a 32mm Plossl (widest possible field), a 20-22mm widefield, and a 13-14mm widefield.
Add a good 2X barlow and you have all the magnifications you'll need.
At some time in the future, add an f/6.3 focal reducer to the back of the scope and gain nearly 59% in field width for your eyepieces.
The focal reducer will also flatten the field and give better star images everywhere in the field.

There are lots of decent eyepieces. Here is a buyer's guide:http://www.cloudynig...e-buyers-guide/

I'll leave it to others to suggest brands and models.

tingdermeli

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #38 on: January 31, 2018, 04:51:04 AM »
+1 for the Baader Hyperion Mk III zoom! It was the first eyepiece I bought, and still the most used with both my scopes (8" f/6 dob and 85mm f/7 doublet refractor). I would also recommend the GSO 30mm 2" SuperView Erfle 68 degree eyepiece. Very affordable and good quality finder eyepiece. Agena Astro has it in stock.

acbacema

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #39 on: January 31, 2018, 06:15:58 AM »
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Take a look at the Paradigm Dual ED or Agena Starguider eyepieces. Both brands are the same eyepieces just different brand names. They a 60° FOV and do an excellent job in a F10 SCT scope. I have 5 of the Paradigm and they are great in my Meade LS8 and C9.25 SCTs. They are easy on the budget also, an important factor when you're just starting out. You can pick them up used for an excellent price, although the new price is only about $60.00.

I have the Celestron 6" f/10 SCT. I really like the 25mm plossl that came with it. Someone already mentioned getting a 32mm plossl, and I agree with that. Plossls are a classic, time tested design, and there's lots of eye relief. I find them very comfortable to use at 32mm and 25mm.

Now after that, if you want to go to 2" wide field low power eyepieces, it can get more complicated and expensive. But at f/10 you don't have to buy a $500 2 incher to get great views.

And the Paradigm / Starguider eyepieces quoted above look great, and are nicely priced.

Also, the 24mm - 8mm zoom eyepiece will give you lots of options and will help you find out what magnifications work best for you and your scope.

So I think you are on the right track.

longpetdowntown

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #40 on: January 31, 2018, 06:16:36 AM »
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1) I've never heard any rule of thumb to stay away from eyepieces wider than 70 degrees.
2) I don't believe Explore Scientific makes a 31mm 85-degree eyepiece (did you mean the 30mm 82-degree?)

For an 8SE, I'd recommend the following for eyepieces:

Explore Scientific 24mm 68-degree
18mm, 12mm and 8mm Astro Tech Paradigm Dual ED (or Agena Astro Starguider Dual ED) or Meade HD-60
Celestron F/6.3 Focal Reducer/Corrector

With this set, you can stick to a 1.25 diagonal and still see pretty much anything an 8-inch SCT can show you.  With the Reducer/Corrector in place and the 24mm 68, you get a 1.2-degree field (about the same field you get with 30mm 82), but you save almost $200 and over a pound in payload. This is as big as a true field as you can get out of an 8-inch F/10 SCT without significant vignetting.  The R/C costs about the same as a 2-inch diagonal.

Take off the R/C and you have a nice medium-low power view with the 24mm 68.  Want a little more power? Switch to the 18mm.  And for planetary/high power viewing, you can pull out the 12mm or 8mm depending on subject and viewing conditions.

If you prefer, you can drop the 8mm and add a 2x barlow.

I agree with the direction of the post above. Adding alternatives in the 24, 12, and 8mm range, I'd suggest:

1. TV Panoptic 24mm or the ES 24mm version.
2. Pentax XF 12mm. Outstanding clarity, ER, contrast, lightweight.
3. Pentax XF 8.5mm. Same as #2.

add a 2x Barlow if desired for flexibility.

Justin Prasad

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #41 on: February 03, 2018, 01:24:54 PM »
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This is the way I see it:

"The best" is a very subjective thing. With very few exceptions, every eyepiece you can buy is quite good, particularly in an F/10 scope. The only way you can "buy the best" is by discovering just what it is you like and what is important to you in an eyepiece. Building a set of eyepieces is a learning process, how important is eye relief? how important is field of view? how important is off-axis correction, scatter, weight, physical size? How much eye relief is enough, how much is too much?

How does the eyepiece play with your scope? For example, a standard 8 inch SCT has significant field curvature. That means in the widest fields of view, stars at the edge of the field and stars at the center of the field are not simultaneously in focus. This affects different observers differently and it depends in part in the eyepiece chosen. The 35mm Panoptic will show less of the telescope's field curvature than the 31mm Nagler because the field of view is slightly narrower and the magnification is less.

Another example, you discussed AFOV and suggested that you thought 70 degrees was a reasonable upper limit. But this is not something you actually know, have actually observed in the field. It might be the first time you look through an 82 degree or 100 degree eyepiece, you are thrilled by the wide field of view. You cannot guess these things, you have to experience them.

Building an eyepiece set is a learning process, it is not only learning about eyepieces but about yourself, about developing your observing skills. Part of that process is figuring out what eyepieces work for you. I know what works for me, for observing the night sky in the telescopes I have, for observing the night sky under the conditions I face and the objects I enjoy.

Sure you can argue that if they have the best and don't know what it is, "Who cares?" I say this: I care and you, you don't want to be that person who merely has the equipment but doesn't really know how to use it properly. You want to be that person who knows how to get the most out of the equipment they have, the person who has the right equipment to match their interests and needs.

There is an active market in used eyepieces, basic eyepieces like Plossls are bought sold as easily, maybe more easily, than fancy eyepieces.

The 31mm Nagler versus the 32mm Celestron Plossl.

The 31mm Nagler plus a 2 inch diagonal adds about 3 pounds to the scope and can result in balance and clearance issues. The eye relief is shorter than a 32mm Plossl. in an F/10 SCT, both are equal except for the 82 degree versus 52 degree AFoV.

Jon


brigtigeartgib

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Re: $ eye pieces
« Reply #42 on: February 04, 2018, 10:23:24 AM »
^   ^

Great picture! Really puts the size difference in perspective.