Author Topic: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors  (Read 454 times)

paurustmorba

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2018, 04:02:59 AM »
Give consideration to how much you want to pour into that scope.  You can buy new, workable scopes with larger apertures for as little as $100.

If saving/updating this one is a project, that is great, but I would hate to see you pour $75 into that one when you can get a better one for only a few dollars more, brand new.

Doesn't mean you toss that one. It means you use it for what it is, as is, and invest in better equipment.  It got you started and for the few dollars you paid for it, it did its job.  And note that many of us have more than one scope.  One might be for lower power wide views. The other might be for splitting double stars.
For example:

Meade Instruments 209003 Infinity 70 AZ Refractor Telescope - About 13 pounds - Gathers about 36% more light than a 60 mm.
70 mm Includes finder scope, 2 eyepieces and a barlow lens that doubles the mag of each eyepiece.http://www.amazon.co...cope under $200
Videohttps://www.youtube....h?v=ck0MQZiSc9Y
Discussion about what can be seen with a 70 mm refractorhttps://www.cloudyni...actor/?hl=+70mmZhumell Z100 100 mm Tabletop reflector – About 6 pounds Gathers 2.7X as much light as a 60 mm.
Includes two eyepieces and a red dot finderhttps://www.telescop...ector-telescope
Discussion and reviewhttp://www.cloudynig...m-f4-newtonian/

Orion SkyScanner 100mm TableTop Reflector Telescope - 6.2 pounds
gets a lot of good reports. Includes 2 eyepieces and a finder scope.
Can also be mounted on a camera tripodhttp://www.telescope...25/p/102007.uts
Videohttps://www.youtube....h?v=-BEzRibaMdshttps://www.youtube....h?v=NihZIw8f1-o

As you go up it gets better.

Meade Infinity 90mm Altazimuth Refractor Telescope - 600 mm FL - About 12 pounds - $160
Received Sky and Telescope Innovative Astronomy Gear in Jan 2016 Sky and Telescope Includes slow motion controls, finder scope, 3 eyepieces and a 2X barlow for 6 magnifications.
https://www.amazon.c...inity+90mm&th=1
Video
https://www.youtube....h?v=FniHZOPwzYI
https://www.youtube....h?v=0mfGjiT_PPc$300

Orion XT6 Classic Dobsonian Telescope Starter kit including barlow, moon map, observers guide, planisphere, red flashlight, 25 mm eyepiece - about 35 pounds but can be moved in 2 pieces. 6”/150 mm
Gathers 6X as much light as a 60 mm.http://www.telescope...yCategoryId=398
Videohttps://www.youtube....h?v=zonuiO7h4gsNot suggesting you need to buy any of these.  Just want you to know what is available before you pour a lot of money into that one.You can get a great set-up for less than $400.

Gandza Startley

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2018, 03:16:44 PM »
Quote
Give consideration to how much you want to pour into that scope.  You can buy new, workable scopes with larger apertures for as little as $100.

If saving/updating this one is a project, that is great, but I would hate to see you pour $75 into that one when you can get a better one for only a few dollars more, brand new.

Doesn't mean you toss that one. It means you use it for what it is, as is, and invest in better equipment.  It got you started and for the few dollars you paid for it, it did its job.  And note that many of us have more than one scope.  One might be for lower power wide views. The other might be for splitting double stars.
For example:

Meade Instruments 209003 Infinity 70 AZ Refractor Telescope - About 13 pounds - Gathers about 36% more light than a 60 mm.
70 mm Includes finder scope, 2 eyepieces and a barlow lens that doubles the mag of each eyepiece.http://www.amazon.co...cope under $200
Videohttps://www.youtube....h?v=ck0MQZiSc9Y
Discussion about what can be seen with a 70 mm refractorhttps://www.cloudyni...actor/?hl=+70mmZhumell Z100 100 mm Tabletop reflector – About 6 pounds Gathers 2.7X as much light as a 60 mm.
Includes two eyepieces and a red dot finderhttps://www.telescop...ector-telescope
Discussion and reviewhttp://www.cloudynig...m-f4-newtonian/

Orion SkyScanner 100mm TableTop Reflector Telescope - 6.2 pounds
gets a lot of good reports. Includes 2 eyepieces and a finder scope.
Can also be mounted on a camera tripodhttp://www.telescope...25/p/102007.uts
Videohttps://www.youtube....h?v=-BEzRibaMdshttps://www.youtube....h?v=NihZIw8f1-o

As you go up it gets better.

Meade Infinity 90mm Altazimuth Refractor Telescope - 600 mm FL - About 12 pounds - $160
Received Sky and Telescope Innovative Astronomy Gear in Jan 2016 Sky and Telescope Includes slow motion controls, finder scope, 3 eyepieces and a 2X barlow for 6 magnifications.https://www.amazon.c...inity+90mm&th=1
Videohttps://www.youtube....h?v=FniHZOPwzYIhttps://www.youtube....h?v=0mfGjiT_PPc$300

Orion XT6 Classic Dobsonian Telescope Starter kit including barlow, moon map, observers guide, planisphere, red flashlight, 25 mm eyepiece - about 35 pounds but can be moved in 2 pieces. 6”/150 mm
Gathers 6X as much light as a 60 mm.http://www.telescope...yCategoryId=398
Videohttps://www.youtube....h?v=zonuiO7h4gsNot suggesting you need to buy any of these.  Just want you to know what is available before you pour a lot of money into that one.You can get a great set-up for less than $400.

Very valid point, and well-taken. I appreciate it.

You hit the nail on the head, when you inferred the sentimentality of the scope. I certainly do not intend to invest much in it. I would like it to be useable, because I think it has more potential than I originally assumed. However, I think it is primarily for quick views of an awesome moon, or something like that. It isn't trash, but definitely worth having around for spur of the moment.

On a great note, I finally took the 15 seconds needed to measure the OD of the EPs. They are 1.25". So, if I am not mistaken even if I decide to invest in 2" EPs, I can purchase an adapter to handle that difference. I am very pleased by that discovery. I just assumed they were the .965". I will start perusing the internet for decent deals on some quality, though not expensive, deals.

You guys have thrown out some great ideas. I am going to be pondering the best idea for an inexpensive rock-solid mount. I think I can still use the altaz, but just figure out how to attach sturdy legs, or to a pipe mount. Either way, I think it can be done. At least done well enough that whatever potential it has will be realized.

Also, I have a Meade 390 AZ in another state, but it should be in my physical possession no later than mid November. Obviously, from what I have read, it is superior to the Tasco. So, whatever EPs I buy can be used with either set-up. On the other hand, though, I would like to be able to use both at the same time. Either way, I am in no rush to spend money, but I think these two issues can be remedied. I appreciate all of the sage advice.

Once I get it squared away, I will throw up a picture or two. ...unless it is too ugly.

Greg Quevedo

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2018, 08:46:21 PM »
If you are buying 1.25" eyepieces you are safe as those will be useable in just about any scope going forward.  Those do not fall into the category of investing to much into this scope as they are not tied to that scope. So, for eyepieces, spend away.

Sounds like you have a reasonable spread of eyepeices but

I am a big fan of zoom eyepieces. I have two, the Celestron 8-24 and the Baader Hyperion 8-24. These are now my main eyepieces.

In your scope this one eyepiece would give you 29X to 87X and everything in between.  Add in the 2X barlow and you have 58X to 174X and everything in between.  However, with a 60 mm objective lens your scope is going to top out around 120X on many targets. But you may be able to go higher on the Moon and double stars.

enmumenge

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2018, 03:01:44 PM »
Thank you, for the suggestion of the zoom.

Is there an advantage to buying a 2" EP? Does that size provide a wider FOV, or something?

contreleri

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2018, 09:38:36 PM »
Note that eyepieces are standardized so you can use any brand eyepiece in any brand telescope. 1.25" and 2" are the most commonly used standard sizes.

Selecting an eyepiece - Orion telescope - Video
This is a very general discussion of eyepieces and why there are a variety of designshttps://www.youtube....h?v=m7u9Q5hV7yc

A key specification, as discussed in the video, is apparent field of view, AFOV. This is the measure of how wide a field of view the eyepiece can present.

2" eyepieces have the potential to provide wider AFOV which will yield wider FOV. This is simply because the barrel is larger. The 1.25" barrel size limits how wide an AFOV that can be provided by the eyepiece due to the field stop of a 1.25" barrel. How much wider can vary greatly.

There are two formula that will be important for you to understand as part of this discussion.

Focal length telescope / Focal length eyepiece = magnification  (note that aperture does not come into play)
AFOV eyepiece / magnification provided by that eyepiece = True Field of View or FOV.
In a 2" focuser you can get a higher FOV at longer focal lengths for lower power, wider fields of view. These are valuable for very large deep sky objects, for viewing large star fields or for use during star hopping.

Example:

My Orion XT8i telescope has a focuser that can take 2" eyepieces. It also has a built in adapter that can take 1.25" eyepieces. That is a common configuration for a 2" focuser. This scope has a 203 mm aperture and 1200 mm focal length.

My typical eyepiece set in that XT8i, for an evening of observing, is the 38 mm and 25 mm 2", my Baader Hyperion 8-24 mm zoom and a 2X barlow. That is all I will use for the evening. That gives me 31.5X, 48X. Then I go to the zoom that will give me 50 to 150X and every mag in between. Then I put the zoom in a 2X barlow and I get 100 to 300X and every magnification in between.Eyepiece Reference Links

This link provides some information on AFOV and eyepieces.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EyepieceEyepiece Designs - This is the one I turn to when I am trying to understand or explain the
differences between the various designs. There are many different designs, Many are named
for their original designer, such as Huyghens, Ramsden, Kellner, Plossl, Konig, Erfle, Branden and Nagler.
http://www.chuckhawk...ce_designs.htm

Eric Hayes

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2018, 10:32:03 PM »
Quote
Note that eyepieces are standardized so you can use any brand eyepiece in any brand telescope. 1.25" and 2" are the most commonly used standard sizes.

Selecting an eyepiece - Orion telescope
This is a very general discussion of eyepieces and why there are a variety of designshttps://www.youtube....h?v=m7u9Q5hV7yc

A key specification when we are talking about eyepieces is apparent field of view, AFOV. This is the measure of how wide a field of view the eyepiece can present. I provide a link below that explains this in greater detail.

There are two formula that will be important for you to understand as part of this discussion.

Focal length telescope / Focal length eyepiece = magnification  (note that aperture does not come into play)

AFOV eyepiece / magnification provided by that eyepiece = True Field of View or FOV.

2" eyepieces have the potential to provide wider AFOV which will yield wider FOV. This is simply because the barrel is larger. The 1.25" barrel size limits how wide an AFOV that can be provided by the eyepiece due to the field stop of a 1.25" barrel. How much wider can vary greatly.

In a 1.25" focuser the lowest power, widest AFOV eyepiece you can get is generally considered to be a 32 mm Plossl which has an AFOV of about 50 to 52 degrees.

In a 2" focuser you can get a higher FOV at longer focal lengths for lower power, wider fields of view. These are valueable for very large deep sky objects, for viewing large star fields or for use during star hopping.

Example:

My Orion XT8i telescope has a focuser that can take 2" eyepieces. It also has a built in adapter that can take 1.25" eyepieces. That is a common configuration for a 2" focuser. This scope has a 1200 mm focal length.

I have two 2" eyepieces for low power and wide view, a 38 mm 70 degree AFOV and a 25 mm 70 degree AFOV.  That AFOV can not be achieved in a 1.25" eyepiece at these long focal lengths. All my other eyepieces, about 20, are 1.25".  So, for example I have 8.8mm, 6.7 mm and 5.5 mm eyepieces that have 82 degree AFOV.

The shorter the focal length the wider the AFOV that can be produced. You can have 2" eyepieces at shorter focal lengths but there is really no benefit once you get shorter than about 24 mm. So most people who have a 2" focuser will have one to 3 two inch eyepieces, but not likely more than that.

2" eyepieces are large and heavy and more costly than comparable eyepieces at 1.25" so if you don't need the wider AFOV a 2" can provide there is no reason to have one. The size and weight of a 2" can also effect the balance of the scope. I use counter weights when I use my 38 mm.FL Scope / FL eyepiece = mag

1200 mm /38 mm = 31.5X

AFOV eyepiece / mag = FOV

70 degree AFOV / 31.5X = 2.2 degree true field of view or FOV.My typical eyepiece set in that XT8i, for an evening of observing, is the 38 mm and 25 mm 2", my Baader Hyperion 8-24 mm zoom and a 2X barlow. That is all I will use for the evening. That gives me 31.5X, 48X. Then I go to the zoom that will give me 50 to 150X and every mag in between. Then I put the zoom in a 2X barlow and I get 100 to 300X and every magnification in between.Eyepiece Reference Links

This link provides some information on AFOV and eyepieces.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EyepieceEyepiece Designs - This is the one I turn to when I am trying to understand or explain the
differences between the various designs. There are many different designs, Many are named
for their original designer, such as Huyghens, Ramsden, Kellner, Plossl, Konig, Erfle, Branden and Nagler.
http://www.chuckhawk...ce_designs.htm


Thanks a ton for that break-down. It puts things in perspective for me.  Seriously, it really does. The bit about the short FL vs. 2" OD was very helpful.

Thanks, again.

Mark Richmond

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2018, 11:54:05 PM »
Quote
On a great note, I finally took the 15 seconds needed to measure the OD of the EPs. They are 1.25". So, if I am not mistaken even if I decide to invest in 2" EPs, I can purchase an adapter to handle that difference. I am very pleased by that discovery. I just assumed they were the .965". I will start perusing the internet for decent deals on some quality, though not expensive, deals.
The next logical question to ask is what type of eyepieces your 60mm has and what type of eyepieces your 90mm has.

On the eyepiece there should a letter or two, such as H, R, K, MA, etc, next to the number that designates the focal length. Knowing this for the eyepieces you have should help. If details about the eyepieces associated with your 90mm are also available then that would help too.

David Corder

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #22 on: January 30, 2018, 01:24:12 AM »
Quote
I had a 3"/76 mm Tasco reflector/Newtonian. It is the red telescope in the photo below.

The optics worked fairly well but the tripod, the mount, was wobbly as could be. You had to basically turn the scope past the target and let it come back due to the twist in the tripod.
As long as the finished product doesn't collapse under its own weight, the manufacturer figures the thing is good enough.

It probably wasn't the mount that was bad, it was that thin piece of metal (?) that connected the upper end the tripod legs to the "triangular" part at the bottom of the mount.

fucheatisu

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #23 on: January 30, 2018, 04:03:34 AM »
Quote
Quote

On a great note, I finally took the 15 seconds needed to measure the OD of the EPs. They are 1.25". So, if I am not mistaken even if I decide to invest in 2" EPs, I can purchase an adapter to handle that difference. I am very pleased by that discovery. I just assumed they were the .965". I will start perusing the internet for decent deals on some quality, though not expensive, deals.
The next logical question to ask is what type of eyepieces your 60mm has and what type of eyepieces your 90mm has.

On the eyepiece there should a letter or two, such as H, R, K, MA, etc, next to the number that designates the focal length. Knowing this for the eyepieces you have should help. If details about the eyepieces associated with your 90mm are also available then that would help too.
The 60mm (Tasco) has H25mm, H12.5mm, and SR4.5mm. The 90 (Meade) has MA25mm, and Or.6mm.

Thank you.

On a side note to the EPs, I took the Tasco mount off of the tripod. I made some plastic washers, and added some metal washers where needed. It seemed to take out nearly all of the slop. I am sure that it will still have a bit, but not as much. I am also going to hang a weight from the center. The weight is a temporary thing, because it looks like it will be clear night. Hopefully I can hunt something interesting down.

I am interested to hear what the letter designations mean. I am googling it in the meantime.

Thank you!

Pablo Abreu

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #24 on: January 30, 2018, 05:20:16 AM »
Quote
Quote

Quote

On a great note, I finally took the 15 seconds needed to measure the OD of the EPs. They are 1.25". So, if I am not mistaken even if I decide to invest in 2" EPs, I can purchase an adapter to handle that difference. I am very pleased by that discovery. I just assumed they were the .965". I will start perusing the internet for decent deals on some quality, though not expensive, deals.
The next logical question to ask is what type of eyepieces your 60mm has and what type of eyepieces your 90mm has.

On the eyepiece there should a letter or two, such as H, R, K, MA, etc, next to the number that designates the focal length. Knowing this for the eyepieces you have should help. If details about the eyepieces associated with your 90mm are also available then that would help too.
The 60mm (Tasco) has H25mm, H12.5mm, and SR4.5mm. The 90 (Meade) has MA25mm, and Or.6mm.

Thank you.

On a side note to the EPs, I took the Tasco mount off of the tripod. I made some plastic washers, and added some metal washers where needed. It seemed to take out nearly all of the slop. I am sure that it will still have a bit, but not as much. I am also going to hang a weight from the center. The weight is a temporary thing, because it looks like it will be clear night. Hopefully I can hunt something interesting down.

I am interested to hear what the letter designations mean. I am googling it in the meantime.

Thank you!
The "H" stands for "Huygenian," a very old design. The others, Symmetrical Ramsden, Modified Achromatic, and Orthoscopic are newer by several hundred years. These give wider fields than the "H" and generally work better.

My old scope had 0.965 "H" eyepieces. The images were quite acceptable, but the field of view was relatively narrow. The biggest potential problem would be if the eyepiece lenses are plastic instead of glass.

If the eyepieces from your larger refractor are also 1.25-inch then you should be able to use them in your 60mm. Shuttling the eyepieces back and forth between locations could be problematic, obviously. The MA25 would be the more useful of the two and I would definitely suggest you try it before buying anything else. The 6mm might push the 60mm beyond its practical limit.

Depending on how well your modifications to the mount work out, you could later consider buying a better eyepiece or two in the 15 to 20mm range, probably a lower cost Plossl design, or a Plossl eyepiece with a longer focal length, no more than about 30 mm in the 1.25-inch size. They should work in the larger refractor too.

isanruptysp

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #25 on: January 31, 2018, 02:27:57 AM »
Quote
snip...I am interested to hear what the letter designations mean. I am googling it in the meantime.Thank you!
Eyepiece Designs - This is the one I turn to when I am trying to understand or explain thedifferences between the various designs. There are many different designs, Many are namedfor their original designer, such as Huyghens, Ramsden, Kellner, Plossl, Konig, Erfle, Branden and Nagler.http://www.chuckhawk...ece_designs.htm

Jacob Julian

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #26 on: February 02, 2018, 04:08:04 PM »
My 60mm refractor's worst enemy is...

https://www.walmart....escope/30224693

It would provide most the parts I would need to refurbish and update the 60 for less than the price of the parts sold separately, if I could find them.

Another of its enemies are those $99 4-inch table-top Dobsonians.

keylozelbou

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #27 on: February 03, 2018, 04:56:23 AM »
Quote
Quote

On a great note, I finally took the 15 seconds needed to measure the OD of the EPs. They are 1.25". So, if I am not mistaken even if I decide to invest in 2" EPs, I can purchase an adapter to handle that difference. I am very pleased by that discovery. I just assumed they were the .965". I will start perusing the internet for decent deals on some quality, though not expensive, deals.
The next logical question to ask is what type of eyepieces your 60mm has and what type of eyepieces your 90mm has.

On the eyepiece there should a letter or two, such as H, R, K, MA, etc, next to the number that designates the focal length. Knowing this for the eyepieces you have should help. If details about the eyepieces associated with your 90mm are also available then that would help too.
The 60mm (Tasco) has H25mm, H12.5mm, and SR4.5mm. The 90 (Meade) has MA25mm, and Or.6mm.

Thank you.

On a side note to the EPs, I took the Tasco mount off of the tripod. I made some plastic washers, and added some metal washers where needed. It seemed to take out nearly all of the slop. I am sure that it will still have a bit, but not as much. I am also going to hang a weight from the center. The weight is a temporary thing, because it looks like it will be clear night. Hopefully I can hunt something interesting down.

I am interested to hear what the letter designations mean. I am googling it in the meantime.

Thank you![/quote]
The "H" stands for "Huygenian," a very old design. The others, Symmetrical Ramsden, Modified Achromatic, and Orthoscopic are newer by several hundred years. These give wider fields than the "H" and generally work better.

My old scope had 0.965 "H" eyepieces. The images were quite acceptable, but the field of view was relatively narrow. The biggest potential problem would be if the eyepiece lenses are plastic instead of glass.

If the eyepieces from your larger refractor are also 1.25-inch then you should be able to use them in your 60mm. Shuttling the eyepieces back and forth between locations could be problematic, obviously. The MA25 would be the more useful of the two and I would definitely suggest you try it before buying anything else. The 6mm might push the 60mm beyond its practical limit.

Depending on how well your modifications to the mount work out, you could later consider buying a better eyepiece or two in the 15 to 20mm range, probably a lower cost Plossl design, or a Plossl eyepiece with a longer focal length, no more than about 30 mm in the 1.25-inch size. They should work in the larger refractor too.[/quote]
Interestingly enough, or maybe not for that matter, the SR4.5mm in the 60mm has shown an impressive view of the portion of the moon that fits inside the FOV. I was surprised that I could bring it into focus. The moon would drift through the FOV in seconds. LOL. It was interesting, though.

I am very curious to see how significant the difference between the two scopes is. If I can do it cheaply enough, I intend to further reinforce this mount, or replace it with an inexpensive better option. For now, though, the washers, and hanging gallon of windshield washer fluid should give us a less space-jiggling experience.

Jerry Dunn

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2018, 01:38:21 PM »
Quote
Quote
snip...I am interested to hear what the letter designations mean. I am googling it in the meantime.

Thank you!

Eyepiece Designs - This is the one I turn to when I am trying to understand or explain the
differences between the various designs. There are many different designs, Many are named
for their original designer, such as Huyghens, Ramsden, Kellner, Plossl, Konig, Erfle, Branden and Nagler.http://www.chuckhawk...ece_designs.htm
Thank you for the link. Great info. Thanks!

aftilicomp

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Re: Any help? Tasco Luminova... mount with the tremors
« Reply #29 on: February 09, 2018, 09:18:23 AM »
I also posted it back in post 20 so if it looks familiar, that is the reason.