Author Topic: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing  (Read 744 times)

brunenrizap

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2018, 04:42:55 PM »
Sg6-
For my mak I have a 25mm plossl and a 15mm. I also have some
Orion wide expanse in 6 and 15mm. Some crappy kellners in 9 and 12 a shorty Barlow and 3x Celestron Barlow. A 40mm... never thought of running a 40mm in it. Was was the field of the 40?
Just for the hell of it my son and I intentionally ran my 4.5 newt to 377x last week on Venus and the moon because they're so bright by stacking the barlows. We did it as a joke. We were amazed that the image was clear and sharp contrasts. Focal length of the newt is 400mm. We were pretty surprised the image held together.
The app I have at the moment is stalk walk 2. I don't own a regular computer just iPads and iPhones at the moment. I'll have to see if I can get stellarium for the apple OS. We haven't seen any Messier objects yet so... rain go away! Learning the star hopping is what I'm on to now and I find it a bit daunting.

closfockralperp

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2018, 07:43:24 PM »
Stellarium for iOS ($2.99) seems to have mixed reviews on the App Store. It is a port of the official app. The original is available for Linux, macOS and Windows. The original is also free.

As far as iOS, most people seem very happy with SkySafari. It's not free. I can't see the price since I purchased it. Be sure to get version 5 not 4. They sell both. It comes in regular, plus and Pro flavors. I don't recall the differences, but I splurged for the Pro version.

nostcharmacon

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2018, 12:31:27 AM »
Quote
Hello all,

I am new to this sight and astronomy (the actual act that is, have been interested in the heavens for 30+ years and know a fair amount the subject) and as my screen name says, I live in Maine. Yup. Freezing my [email protected]& off at the moment but after many years of fighting the risk of addiction, I've purchased my first scope just before xmas... and then a week later a second...now looking at ordering another one.... oh and one more. Just one more! Promise! This is going to be an issue.
Anyway, I am trying to learn the sky and the locations of obejects that I can see with a 4.5" Newtonian as well as a 90mm mak. Been attacking the moon now that it's back (wolf moon last night) and the planets and learning some of the stars as I go but no DSO stuff. Mainly because I'm battling setting circles and are getting ready to abandon the little buggers for now and trying to learn star hopping. A lot of the things that I see listed on line and in my star apps are things that I find out AFTER searching for them that I need bigger aperture to see. Does anyone have any ideas per chance? I am ordering a 10" Skywatcher dob and either a 150mm mak or 180mm. Not sure yet. Fighting the urge not to wimp out here and use a goto mount to find things. Seriously, goto isn't wimping out... I'm just trying to learn old school first before going that route as I don't want to give up just yet on the manual part. The exploring is half the fun.
Thanks to any who may respond!

Where in Maine? We have some great Astronomy Clubs here in Maine with lots of fine people. Here in southern Maine it'shttp://www.asnne.org Astronomical Society of Northern New England, Kennebunk ME
or Southern Maine Astronomers, Portland ME

but more Club's dot the landscape all along the coast as far Down East as you can go…Eastport ME

Niro Hardy

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2018, 05:22:10 AM »
Zawijava- I'm near Sebago Lake. I've spoken to Robert with the astronomical society and he is a great guy. I was trying to get to the planetarium for a meeting but I couldn't make it. I'd love to be able to speak with people in my area and go to a star party or two!

David Schwartz

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2018, 10:50:20 PM »
I will guarantee that if you get involved with a local club and start attending their events your knowledge and skill will grow exponentially. I'd also suggest holding off on further purchases until you attend a star party or two and try the views through a wide range of scopes and eyepieces there. I often say to newbies, you would not buy a car without test driving it; same applies to a scope.

Jason Rivard

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2018, 11:06:04 PM »
Ascii,

sky safari is running 59.99 for the 5 version which as you stated, is the only one to get. I am getting the app regardless shortly after reviewing it. It's freaking amazing. I too will get the top version. Also, I am changing scope choices around and getting a Skywatcher 8" dob (for moving off site easily) and then saving for a 14"+ goto dob that sky safari can be used with later. In fact, I may later build a platform and install a pier and snag a small plastic dome observatory to house the future dob.

John Trujillo

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2018, 07:21:09 AM »
MikeBOKC,

I agree with what you're saying. I'm not too worried about the money invested in the scopes however. I want to try a bunch of different scopes but I also know what types I like so far since I have a small newt and mak. Bigger of both to start. I am a gun collector and have been for years and I have a decent number of them. Some I shoot, some I just look at. I like the aspects of them all.
However!!!.... your right... attend star parties and I will when some come up that I find out about. I can tell already that not all scopes are the same even though they may of the same breed, just like cars as you stated. I'm NOT purchasing any refractors or Schmitt- cassegrains until I get to try them out first, no matter the reviews. The two I have I did a lot of research on based on bang for buck and to cheaply try out these types, and I found that I like them so adding larger maks and newts make sense based on reviews of others. I hope I'm not sounding like a jerk or anything here because I appreciate all the help and thoughts from folks.

Best,
sean

bescoldsearchroom

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2018, 09:21:49 AM »
Sean,

While it does not specifically deal with purchasing telescopes, you may find some of the information presented in my post (#22) at http://www.cloudynig...ur-astronomers/informative.

Dave Mitsky

Matt Hodge

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2018, 11:35:45 PM »
Dave! That's quite the treasure trove of information! Thank you! I'll be digging in that for quite some time.

anpiecaga

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #24 on: January 30, 2018, 12:32:34 AM »
A pair of 10 X 50 binoculars are a great observing tool when it's freezing cold outside. They make for really quick sessions. If you have light pollution, they can help find fainter objects / reference stars with their wide fields. When it's single digits, I do my astronomy through my kitchen windows with binoculars or a small refractor at low power.

Adam Cormier

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #25 on: January 30, 2018, 02:56:54 AM »
Cpk133,

oh how I wish I could look out the windows at the sky and stay warm! My house is notched into a hillside and we just got the first floor done and capped it over for the winter and my second floor gets done in the spring as I'm building it myself. My view right now are trees and my little Pygmy goat pets who stare at me from their house and me at them when it's cold out. All though, I admit that they come inside to get warm and have snacks. Sorry for the sidetrack there... no I'm not crazy either, they are great pets and better behaved than dogs I've had.
Anyway, back on track, I only have tiny binos at the moment and I've had this stigma (wrongly I know) of using only telescopes for viewing the night sky. I just can't seem to aim the money at binos when I'm saving for the next two scopes and I know that dumb since a good set are a wonderful asset. Maybe I should get going and get a good pair. I'm glad you posted that! Since giving into this hobby finally I have revamped the window selections for my upstairs and have added huge slider windows and mulled monster sliders in the master bedroom. Peering through glass isn't optimal but it can be enough to scratch the itch and NOT FREEZE TO DEATH!

rackramasca

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #26 on: January 31, 2018, 01:17:26 AM »
I've found that the best way to learn the sky, for me, is to have someone experienced show you the night sky. What the constellations are, what to look at, etc. Astronomy groups are the best for this, in my opinion. A couple of weeks ago I made it down to the Southworth Planetarium and met the guys from the Southern Maine Astronomical Society. Real good group of people there. Although they mostly do presentations and not outdoor observatory, they do have access to the planetarium and it was fun to show what is up in the night sky currently. Pretty amazing piece of craftsmanship, the optical planetarium projector.

Theodore Inlaw

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #27 on: January 31, 2018, 04:20:39 AM »
Quote
I will guarantee that if you get involved with a local club and start attending their events your knowledge and skill will grow exponentially. I'd also suggest holding off on further purchases until you attend a star party or two and try the views through a wide range of scopes and eyepieces there. I often say to newbies, you would not buy a car without test driving it; same applies to a scope.

great advice
Try befor u buy
its mighty easy to impulse buy in this hobby

headsbigwardsubs

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #28 on: January 31, 2018, 06:56:45 AM »
Hello and welcome from a fellow Mainer.,I'm up near Farmington.,with pretty dark skies. A planisphere is a great tool for learning the way the constellations move across the sky.,and to show what part of the sky is going to be viewable for each night. Learning the constellations is key to helping you to find all the faint fuzzies. Using bino's through the window is how I started to learn to star hop.,my 7x35x bino matched the charts just about right for what stars I could see with them.,and it's fun not to freeze.,Good luck.,,stay warm.,get to a club meeting if you can.,

Mike Brown

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Re: Brand new member needing some assistance with northeastern US viewing
« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2018, 09:17:32 AM »
After your 10" dob comes, I would play with it before getting the larger Mak's. The only issues that a 10 inch dob has is the size,
and you need to cool it before you use it. I have one and it is my favorite scope. It works well on planets, and dso's. With a nice 2 inch
eyepiece it can achieve a medium filed of view.

If you have not already purchased your dob, you may want to consider a
10" orion dob with the intelliscope feature. This has a computer to tell you where to push the scope to get items into view.
I do not have one of these, but others here love them. You are not obligated to use the computer, you can push this around like
any other dob with no guiding.

If you have a traditional dob, you can make a set of manual setting circles. I have some on mine.  If you download
sky-safari to a tablet. It will give you real time altitude and azimuth coordinates of any object in the sky. You then use your manual
"circles" to find the object by pushing your dob to the given settings. This link should get you started.
http://www.cloudynig...es/#entry813804. The Mak's take about as long to cool. The front elements are very susceptible to dew or frost. They have fairly narrow fields of view.