Author Topic: Celestron 6 inch dob  (Read 405 times)

lolenokind

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Celestron 6 inch dob
« on: December 29, 2017, 05:13:43 AM »
I removed the link cuz I bought the scope., See below.
Assuming this thing isn't trashed, is 50 bucks a fair price? I mean for 50 bucks how
wrong can a guy go right?



Chris Castillo

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2017, 01:52:08 PM »
Quote
https://boise.craigs...5432337023.html
Assuming this thing isn't trashed, is 50 bucks a fair price?  I mean for 50 bucks how
wrong can a guy go right? 

Grab it, Dusty IMHO is a good sign, its when a scope is squeaky clean I'm nervous, like was it cleaned properly.

Joel Cahill

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2017, 02:18:20 AM »
That one there might just be a Discovery made primary in it, very nice for 50 bucks if it works and the mirrors aren't trashed . Me, I'd grab it in a heartbeat

nijambaci

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2017, 10:38:29 AM »
So I just went and got the scope. Couple things. !st, unless my tape is broken, it appears to be an 8 inch, not a 6. The tube is 10 inch on the inside, and there is an inch of space between the edge of the mirror, and the tube on either side. 2nd, it came with three eyepieces. 1st 2 are just standard Celestron wide angle 25 and 10 mm. The third is a Vixen LV series 20 mm long eye relief still in the plastic with the silica gel packet. Mirrors are dusty, but no blemishes of any kind. The primary has thumb screw adjustments, and the secondary is a single arm coming out of the side of the tube. Base is dusty with almost no wear. Oh, and I got it for 40 bucks! Only downside, is it started snowing as I was coming home, so I guess it will just sit until the storms pass. It is missing the finder scope, but I really couldn't complain. Suggestions on a finder, as well as a collimation tool would be appreciated.

Robert Garcia

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2017, 08:45:34 AM »
$40 for everything...sounds like a deal. The Vixen LV eyepiece would cost more than that. It's like buying an eyepiece and getting a free scope!

Tye Paez

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2017, 05:18:37 PM »
Congratulations on what is essentially a buy of a lifetime.

pensranbafarc

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2017, 07:24:11 PM »
Quote
It is missing the finder scope, but I really couldn't complain. Suggestions on a finder, as well as a collimation tool would be appreciated.


gkmurrell - I'd recommend a telrad for a finder; I use one on my 10" dob and it works great. For collimation, a simple laser collimator works very well and they aren't too pricey, only about 60-70 dollars.

ringnasingsimb

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2018, 08:57:02 AM »
That was an awesome deal. Congratulations.

Zac Johnson

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2018, 01:02:49 AM »
I own a Celestron 8" Starhopper dob (black sonotube model). It's Discovery-made LTM (Low Thermal Mass) conical primary does a really nice job. Under good seeing, I've pushed the magnifcation to over 400x (50x/in) on Jupiter and the image quality held up. Once, I even saw Sirius B with this model scope.

On mine, over time, I did the following upgrades:
 Flocked the tube with Protostar's flockboard
 - this improves contrast in my light polluted environment. I can see fainter fuzzies, and more.
 Replaced the cast single stalk secondary holder with a four-vane spider.
 - The original made it difficult to precisely center the secondary on the optical axis. A single stalk gives a broad single diffraction spike.
 The spider produces a sharper four spike pattern, that I prefer.
 Replaced the finder with a Telrad.

I use a Rigel Systems Aline collimation cap for quick primary tilt touchups before each session. These are very handy. I use mine as focuser dust caps, so they are always with my scopes.

I tend to use a laser collimator only for testing and adjusting the secondary mirror alignment. You have to be careful to make sure that a laser collimator is collimated, itself. Most can be off axis and if they are, they will make you add in miscollimation! There are postings that explain how to check or recheck the laser.

If you only buy one collimation tool, make it a combination cheshire/sight tube. It's the most versatile. Read up on how to do star testing on your scope.

I have no complaints about Telrads, but Rigel's Quikfinder is an effective alternative that has a pulsing feature as standard. It sits higher than the Telrad, so lining up your head behind it may be easier than with a Telrad. Both can dew over on occasions.

Your new scope can do a respectable job on the planets. Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars will all be at opposition in the coming months. If you only have the eyepieces that came with your scope, consider getting a decent long eye relief eyepiece or two in the 5-7mm range for use on the planets, etc. These will give you higher magnification options that you'll eventually want. I enjoy using the Celestron X-Cel LX line. Yeah, they cost more than your scope, but with the steal you got for the scope, that's gonna be the case with most new eyepieces!

Jim G.

Daniel Horton

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2018, 08:45:17 AM »
Quote
I own a Celestron 8" Starhopper dob (black sonotube model). It's Discovery-made LTM (Low Thermal Mass) conical primary does a really nice job. Under good seeing, I've pushed the magnifcation to over 400x (50x/in) on Jupiter and the image quality held up. Once, I even saw Sirius B with this model scope.

On mine, over time, I did the following upgrades:
 Flocked the tube with Protostar's flockboard
 - this improves contrast in my light polluted environment. I can see fainter fuzzies, and more.
 Replaced the cast single stalk secondary holder with a four-vane spider.
 - The original made it difficult to precisely center the secondary on the optical axis. A single stalk gives a broad single diffraction spike.
 The spider produces a sharper four spike pattern, that I prefer.
 Replaced the finder with a Telrad.

I use a Rigel Systems Aline collimation cap for quick primary tilt touchups before each session. These are very handy. I use mine as focuser dust caps, so they are always with my scopes.

I tend to use a laser collimator only for testing and adjusting the secondary mirror alignment. You have to be careful to make sure that a laser collimator is collimated, itself. Most can be off axis and if they are, they will make you add in miscollimation! There are postings that explain how to check or recheck the laser.

If you only buy one collimation tool, make it a combination cheshire/sight tube. It's the most versatile. Read up on how to do star testing on your scope.

I have no complaints about Telrads, but Rigel's Quikfinder is an effective alternative that has a pulsing feature as standard. It sits higher than the Telrad, so lining up your head behind it may be easier than with a Telrad. Both can dew over on occasions.

Your new scope can do a respectable job on the planets. Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars will all be at opposition in the coming months. If you only have the eyepieces that came with your scope, consider getting a decent long eye relief eyepiece or two in the 5-7mm range for use on the planets, etc. These will give you higher magnification options that you'll eventually want. I enjoy using the Celestron X-Cel LX line. Yeah, they cost more than your scope, but with the steal you got for the scope, that's gonna be the case with most new eyepieces!

Jim G.

So I just ordered the cheshire and the cap. Still up in the air between the Telrad and the Quickfinder so I may hold off on that for a bit. I also have an ETX 90 with Autostar, so I figure I can let it point at stuff, and then point the dob in the same general direction.

Leon Vale

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2018, 02:27:58 PM »
Quote
So I just went and got the scope. Couple things. !st, unless my tape is broken, it appears to be an 8 inch, not a 6. The tube is 10 inch on the inside, and there is an inch of space between the edge of the mirror, and the tube on either side. 2nd, it came with three eyepieces. 1st 2 are just standard Celestron wide angle 25 and 10 mm. The third is a Vixen LV series 20 mm long eye relief still in the plastic with the silica gel packet. Mirrors are dusty, but no blemishes of any kind. The primary has thumb screw adjustments, and the secondary is a single arm coming out of the side of the tube. Base is dusty with almost no wear. Oh, and I got it for 40 bucks! Only downside, is it started snowing as I was coming home, so I guess it will just sit until the storms pass. It is missing the finder scope, but I really couldn't complain. Suggestions on a finder, as well as a collimation tool would be appreciated.

Fantastic deal!!!!!!
Telrad or other bulls-eye finders are very helpful to me.

Ryan Miller

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2018, 11:54:27 AM »
So, upon further review, the Vixen eyepiece is actually a 2.5 mm with 20 mm eye relief. Nice looking eyepiece, but if I understand all the stuff I read on magnification, isn't that one going to require almost absurdly perfect sky conditions to be able to use it? I am llooking at a few different 7 mm eyepieces. Celestron XL, Orion Edge On 6 mm. Amazon also has a couple Astromania 7mm, one that is 58 degree, the other is 82. . Anyone have any pros/cons on any of these?

Scott Etrheim

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2018, 01:15:15 AM »
I calculate 480X using the 2.5 in your scope.It is right at the maximum per the common 60x per inch of aperture.Probably most useful for seeing details on the Moon;even Jupiter will likely not be bright enough for a sharp image with that much magnification.

Consider buying a shorty 2x barlow that will make your 25 into a 12.5 and your 10 into a 5.A 5 ,giving 240x,should be useful for planets almost any night.The 25 ,12.5,and 10mm should do nicely for nebulas and clusters.

Keith Dixon

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2018, 08:32:55 AM »
gkmurrell - I would agree that the 2.5mm ep is probably a bit much for the 6 inch reflector. Not only do you need exceptional seeing to be able to use it effectively, but with a 6 inch reflector, you are going to lose a tremendous amount of light with that ep...in other words, whatever you are looking at will be really dim.

I'd recommend you use both your 10mm and 25mm for a while to see what the differences are and to see what you like. Also, borrow ep's from other folks whom you observe with to try different magnifications/fields of view to see what looks best, in your scope, to you. You may find that a third ep you want might be something in between the 10 and 25.

I've found that I have different field of view preferences with my various telescopes. Individual scopes just seem to perform best (i.e. give me the most enjoyable views) in a certain range of magnification. I don't use some formula to determine that; I base it on what I enjoy with that particular scope.

With my 10 inch dob, I find that I use a 17mm and 13mm more than anything else. I also have a 9mm I use to get a little more magnification on occasion. I very rarely use my 5mm because most objects, other than planets, are simply too dim to really enjoy with that ep. A smaller, brighter image, to me, is more enjoyable.

uncritoges

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Re: Celestron 6 inch dob
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2018, 04:49:11 AM »
Quote
gkmurrell - I would agree that the 2.5mm ep is probably a bit much for the 6 inch reflector. Not only do you need exceptional seeing to be able to use it effectively, but with a 6 inch reflector, you are going to lose a tremendous amount of light with that ep...in other words, whatever you are looking at will be really dim.
Quote

So I just went and got the scope. Couple things. !st, unless my tape is broken, it appears to be an 8 inch, not a 6. The tube is 10 inch on the inside, and there is an inch of space between the edge of the mirror, and the tube on either side.

Wow, it seems to be an 8" W/ eyepieces for $40 !