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General Astronomy => Beginners Forum => Topic started by: postbypopect on December 26, 2017, 09:22:27 AM

Title: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: postbypopect on December 26, 2017, 09:22:27 AM
Hello all, I'm considering two utilized scopes for my very first, both are for sale locally for the same asking price ($200).  I'd prefer to stay within this price range as I am uncertain how much time I'll be spending  and I don't want to drop $600 on a scope that ends up being used half a dozen nights per year.  Portability is important, I'd like to have the ability to put it in my car and take it when I go camping but I believe either one is good for this.  My principal interest is watching deep sky objects but I'll obviously spend time seeing the planets and moon.

Both I'm considering are:

Sky-Watcher 6" dobsonian

or

Orion Skyview 6EQ

Ideas?
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: pensranbafarc on December 28, 2017, 01:26:04 AM
The 6EQ might be a better value but I'd recommend the dob if its optics are good. Why? The ease of use of a dob wins the day, that's why they are so common now.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Gregory Station on December 29, 2017, 12:58:49 AM
Both are good scopes. The SkyWatcher Dob will be easier to use and transport. Do you have any experience with EQ mounts? They can be more trouble than they are worth in beginner scopes. I have a computerized EQ and a manual Alt-Az and the Alt-Az gets used 4x as often.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: ticploodunghen on December 30, 2017, 02:35:23 PM
I have no experience using either type of mount. When I was very young my father showed me some views of the moon and a couple planets with his refractor (20+ years ago). I tried using a very low quality scope out in NM while on vacation with family a few years back but don't remember seeinganything - thought it was as easy as pointing it into the sky and looking through the viewer, didn't bother to read the user manual or even check it out inside before taking it out into the dark. Naked eye viewing was more enjoyable.

I recently took a trip to an observatory of some note and also attended their star party. I was treated to views of jupiter/saturn/mars as well as m33, m31, m57 and a couple other M objects whose designations I forget through some very nice telescopes of all sorts. This sparked my interest.

I'm not intimidated by the idea of the EQ mount but perhaps that is due to my lack of experience in setting them up and locating objects.

Edit to add: Initially I was set on and am still leaning towards the EQ mounted reflector (partially because on first look the seem easier to transport with their shorter tubes but they do require more set up time) but decided I should at least look at the dobs as well. Are both of these scopes capable of producing the same image quality assuming equivalent eyepieces are used with the same atmospheric conditions?
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: vuicapathvie on December 31, 2017, 03:41:24 PM
I think it is a real toss up.
I think I would prefer the dob because of a longer focal length; easier to collimate, easier to find a good focus at high power....
but that is Me ( I spend Far more time on the planets/moon). F/5 used to be ? 'suspicious', 'dumpy', but the quality on a LOT of the faster mirrors these days is Much better !!
If you are at all handy with some hand tools, and since you are mainly interested in deep sky (so, wider field of views?) I would suggest getting the f/5 with the equatorial. The equatorial mount might be very useful in time. You can get used to it whenever you want. When you get the scope, build a dob mount for it, or a simple alt az plumbing pipe mount you can easily break down and transport. You'd have the best of both worlds.
High power might be a bit harder to get to with the shorter focal length, but there are ways to get there.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: precaregmo on January 03, 2018, 10:18:33 AM
I would go for the Sky-Watcher 6 inch dob.

Why? I am a little suspicious about the quality of the tripod and the mount of the Orion Skyview 6EQ.

I have the Celestron 150 XLT Omin on a CG4 with the 1.75 inch tripod. Very reliable and steady combination. The Orion mount and tripod in the advertisement does not appear of the same quality. Mind you, I have not seen or used this mount and tripod I only surmise this conclusion from the picture.

L.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: grounincalpay on January 03, 2018, 07:17:35 PM
Good points already made. The only thing I'd add is that Orion is notorious for not helping non-original owners with any parts/mechanical issues with their scopes if something is missing or damaged. Personally I avoid used Orion scopes because of that. I believe Sky-Watcher is better on that front so that's the option I'd choose.

Cheers,

Pauly
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: slotiniphin on January 04, 2018, 03:53:16 PM
Hi I love my 6" f/5. I love the EQ mount. Once you set your latitude, all you have to do each time is plunk down the scope
with the axis pointing north and make sure it is level. What this buys you over the dob is that one twist of the slow motion
dial keeps the image centered. This is helpful when using high magnification because with the dob you will have to keep
nudging the scope, and sometimes a controlled nudge is hard with a standard dob base.

BoldAxis is correct, the celestron version of the CG4, has a much better tripod. I have both tripods, the celestron is a beast and heavy but it is solid. The orion is kind of spindly but it will work with this scope. You will experience some vibration when you have to focus or if it is windy.

The 6" EQ will have a wider field of view and will require a little more love as far as adjustment.
The 6" dob is the opposite, a little narrower field of view and little less adjustment.
The 6" dob mount will be sturdier than the EQ and will settle down faster in wind or when the scope is touched.
The 6" dob will be easier on your eyepieces.

I think both of your choices are good ones. $200 seems a little high for a 6" used dob.
It also depends upon accessories that are bundled with it. Are there reasonable eyepieces,
a finder. If your budget is $200, I don't want you have to spend another $100 or more for
eyepieces and a finder.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Tawakal Stahlberg on January 04, 2018, 08:13:58 PM
Thanks for the replies so far guys. Sounds like I might as well flip a coin.

Neither scope comes with any extras beyond what they ship with; the dob is (according to the owner) assembled but never used, so it may make the Orion a "better value" if you consider value a percentage of the original purchase price.

Quality of the mount/base/tripod is certainly a concern, I imagine a shaky image would be very frustrating. If there were a good condition used Omni XLT 150 around me that would seem to be the obvious choice with it's much more substantial tripod but no dice. I'm just simply not going to spring 2.5x my self imposed budget buying a new scope that I may end up barely using. The way I look at it is if I spend $200 on a halfway decent used first scope and actually end up using it enough to justify buying something better I can just donate this one to the local astro club without losing much $ and then spring for a ~$1k telescope.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Santosh Wolf on January 09, 2018, 12:59:50 AM
Yeah seems everyone on Craigslist buys stuff yet gets bored 5 minutes after setting up lol

dont believe it, but unless they dropped it it should be fine. Inspect the mirrors. Look down the tube to inspect the large primary mirror. Remove any eyepieces to inspect the smaller secondary.

As as a first scope I'd grab the 6" dob. I wouldn't mind owning one myself.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: laycacdownsell on January 10, 2018, 07:02:40 PM
If your general interest is dso, then the 150mm/f5 should be sufficient for your needs. I would not worry about the mount, should be eq3/cg4. Set your latitude and point it north, use a good compass if desired.

Good viewing,

Dave
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: John Sanchez on January 11, 2018, 08:36:58 AM
The 6" dob is an easy choice. Go for it!
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: James Clayton on January 11, 2018, 11:04:47 AM
The primary mirror-cell on a Sky-Watcher 6" f/8 Dobsonian is not quite up to snuff, as seen in Fig.i...

http://i.stack.imgur.com/8Ju4o.png (http://i.stack.imgur.com/8Ju4o.png)

It employs a rubber grommet of some sort, which will degrade over time, and instead of a metal spring for the adjustment screws. Perhaps no big deal for an f/8 that one might not collimate that often. It may be possible to replace the grommets with springs in future.

The all-metal cell of the Orion 6" f/5 has metal springs for its adjustment screws: fully adjustable and fully collimatable...
The focusser is very important, as it is the most mechanical part of the telescope, and the one on the Sky-Watcher 6" f/8 may be superior, and does allow for the use of 2" oculars with their wider fields-of-view...

http://www.opticalvi...s/large/225.jpg (http://www.opticalvision.co.uk/user/products/large/225.jpg)

The tube-rings on the Orion 6" f/5 allows for rotating the tube for a more comfortable focusser and eye position. Focussers on Dobsonians are in a fixed position; forever.

A 6" f/5 is more versatile in observing the gamut, everything, and from a low 23x to over 200x with 2x and 3x barlows; however, only 1.25" oculars are possible.

I have the same Orion 6" f/5, and with its tube-rings and dovetail interface, I enjoy the versatility of placing it on either an alt-azimuth or equatorial...
The equatorial can be motorised, for automatic hands-free tracking of any object...

http://www.telescope...ts?ensembleId=6 (http://www.telescope.com/Accessories/Telescope-Drives-Controllers/Orion-EQ-3M-Single-Axis-Telescope-Drive/c/3/sc/46/p/7829.uts?ensembleId=6)
(https://s18.postimg.org/xsk20p32d/12_attachment_00.jpg) (https://postimg.org/image/xsk20p32d/)

(https://s18.postimg.org/xsk20pas5/12_attachment_01.jpg) (https://postimg.org/image/xsk20pas5/)
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: notaslasof on January 12, 2018, 10:34:36 AM
Quote
Quote
The focuser is very important, as it is the most mechanical part of the telescope, and the one on the Sky-Watcher 6" f/8 may be superior, and does allow for the use of 2" oculars with their wider fields-of-view...
Moreover, f/8 is much more forgiving than f/5 as far as the focuser is concerned. To focus at high power in an f/5 scope, you really need a high-quality Crayford focuser, preferably with dual speeds.
The two-inch focuser is really a big deal. The only downsides of f/8 are the longer tube and the narrow field of view. But an f/8 scope with a 2-inch focuser has a wider field of view than an f/5 scope with a 1.25-inch focuser.

<p class="citation">Quote
The tube-rings on the Orion 6" f/5 allows for rotating the tube for a more comfortable focuser and eye position. Focusers on Dobsonians are in a fixed position; forever.
True. But the eyepiece angle on a well-designed Dob is pretty much optimal to start with, so there's no incentive to rotate it. Rotating is only a really big issue when using an equatorial mount.

<p class="citation">Quote
A 6" f/5 is more versatile in observing the gamut ...
[/quote]
Not if the f/8 has a 2-inch focuser and the f/5 has a 1.25-inch focuser. That evens the score.

<p class="citation">Quote
I have the same Orion 6" f/5, and with its tube-rings and dovetail interface, I enjoy the versatility of placing it on either an alt-azimuth or equatorial...
[/quote]
That's certainly a nice option -- but it comes at the price of purchasing two mounts.

The Dob would certainly be more stable than the 6-inch f/5 on an AstroView mount, but both should be just fine. The AstroView is a little underbuilt, but it should be adequate for a 6-inch f/5 tube.

The learning curve for a Dob is zero -- most beginners at star parties can use one without instruction. It does take a little while to get used to the quirks of a German equatorial mount, especially in combination with a Newtonian, which presents several gotchas. But most people can master them after 10 or 20 hours of use. And once mastered, they are very, very nice for tracking objects at high power, even without a motor. They also offer more options as far as star-hopping is concerned.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Pat Young on January 12, 2018, 12:13:30 PM
The Dob will be easier and quicker but the eq can be better for finding objects and can be motorized easily for tracking.I'd be very tempted to get BOTH.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Brandon Belknap on January 18, 2018, 07:34:41 AM
"To focus at high power in an f/5 scope, you really need a high-quality Crayford focuser, preferably with dual speeds."

Two-speed focussers are for imaging purposes primarily, as I've no problem focussing with my f/5; nice try, though.

"...so there's no incentive to rotate it."

Synta et al are not going to equip their mass-production Dobsonians with rotating tube sections or tube rings; too expensive.

Bresser(Jinghua?), however, has, and no doubt in response to demand...

http://www.telescope...ian-8-inch.html (http://www.telescopehouse.com/bresser-messier-dobsonian-8-inch.html)

Now, that's what I'm talking about.

"...but it comes at the price of purchasing two mounts."

Not "purchasing", as though you have to run out for a gallon of milk and a dozen eggs; rather, acquiring, over time, over the years, and as I have.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: trualolalun on January 20, 2018, 01:27:37 PM
For these prices you might consider buying both and selling the one you don't want to keep. GN
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Charlie Carpenter on January 20, 2018, 02:46:45 PM
I figure if I'm going to spend $400 I might as well go ahead and get an XT8, Omni XLT 150, or Meade LX70, you can only look through one at a time right?

The whole reason I was considering the dob was due to my concern about the tripod on the skyview, but if the sky-watcher has a sub-par collimation assembly that doesn't do me much good either. So now I'm leaning back towards the skyview...
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Paul Nyuon on January 20, 2018, 05:36:32 PM
As I had stated earlier, the focusser is very important, and a most essential part of the optical train. A successful collimation is dependent upon the focusser to quite an extent. Unfortunately, Synta, the manufacturer of these and other telescopes, does not take 1.25" focussers too seriously.

Behold, Synta's plastic 1.25" focusser, and in all its awe-full and horrid "magnificence"...
As you can see, I tried my best to make it nice, but ultimately, to no avail. I am close to replacing it with an all-metal unit, and eventually, you would want to as well.

Precision escapes it, but that's just me. However, salvation may be just a rock-thrown-across-the-pond away...

http://www.ebay.com/...HsAAOSw7W5XNsIK (http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-25-31-7mm-Astronomy-Telescope-Reflector-Type-Focuser-for-Eyepieces-Hot-sale-/361560117592?hash=item542ea99158:g:6HsAAOSw7W5XNsIK)

...an all-metal 1.25" Newtonian focusser, although I know nothing about it, as to its precision and quality. Its drawtube and the rack thereof might have to be cut and shortened a bit to ensure that the tip of the drawtube does not jut out into the light path.

Now, that's not to say that the telescope itself is bad, for the rest is very good, especially the primary mirror and its cell. If it wasn't, I wouldn't be replacing the focusser, and would move on to another branding of a 6" f/5. The only other 6" f/5 is this one, but it comes with a 2" focusser...

http://www.highpoint...iYzEaAmkI8P8HAQ (http://www.highpointscientific.com/celestron-omni-xlt-150-newtonian-reflector-optical-tube-assembly-ota-31057ota?utm_source=google&amp;utm_medium=cse&amp;utm_term=CEL-31057-OTA&amp;gclid=Cj0KEQjw0f-9BRCF9-D60_n4rKcBEiQAnXW4-3igNvLmCnveJwKifejW41Owis7NvEeGcpDQjhniYzEaAmkI8P8HAQ)

...which results in a larger secondary obstruction, and thereby reducing brightness and contrast a bit further. The image within that listing illustrates the slightly older model which originally came with a 1.25" focusser, but no more...

http://i48.tinypic.com/14j9ufr.jpg (http://i48.tinypic.com/14j9ufr.jpg)

The Orion 6" f/5 appears to be the last of the 6" f/5 instruments throughout the world with a 1.25" focusser, and a smaller secondary mirror.

There is the Celestron C6-N, and with a 1.25" focusser, but its primary-mirror cell is practically the same as that of the Sky-Watcher 6" f/8 and the Zhumell Z130...

https://stargazerslo...-1416380156.jpg (https://stargazerslounge.com/uploads/monthly_11_2014/post-39802-0-27381300-1416380156.jpg)

...and the telescope itself... http://firstlightopt...mages/C6NGT.jpg (http://firstlightoptics.com/user/content/prodimages/C6NGT.jpg)

Understand that I did not want you to decide before knowing the particulars and the truth about the focusser of the Orion 6" f/5 Newtonian...
(https://s13.postimg.org/v2c6v35wj/18_attachment_00.jpg) (https://postimg.org/image/v2c6v35wj/)

(https://s13.postimg.org/lhsk87w03/18_attachment_01.jpg) (https://postimg.org/image/lhsk87w03/)
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Steven Morrison on January 20, 2018, 09:02:01 PM
Quote
The 6" dob is an easy choice. Go for it!

+1 That. Its hard to beat simplicity of a 6" Dob and the killer planetary views it provides at F/8. Ease of collimation is another plus.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: subhymerlo on January 23, 2018, 12:03:05 AM
Quote
As I had stated earlier, the focuser is very important, and a most essential part of the optical train. A successful collimation is dependent upon the focusser to quite an extent. Unfortunately, Synta, the manufacturer of these and other telescopes, does not take 1.25" focussers too seriously.
To amplify on this: the plastic focusers found on most inexpensive telescopes are fine for deep-sky observing, which is typically done at magnifications of 10X to 20X per inch of aperture. But they get touchy at the magnifications used for the Moon, planets, and tight double stars, which typically range from 25X per inch of aperture on up. They're not hopeless, but I do tend to spend a lot of time overshooting perfect focus in one direction, then overshooting in the other, as I try to fine-tune the precise position of the eyepiece.

This also depends a lot on the focal ratio of the telescope in question. Inexpensive focusers are a really bad problem at f/4, a significant issue at f/5, and hardly ever a problem at f/8. That's because a tiny change in eyepiece position has a much larger effect at short focal ratios than at long focal ratios.

Good focusers are a joy to use, a critical component of any truly high-quality telescope. Unfortunately, first-rate focusers all on their own cost more than the entire telescope packages that you're considering. Precision machining doesn't come cheap.

Unlike SkyMuse, I'm not allergic to the idea of plastic. There are places where it's the perfect material to use, including some places in a telescope. Focusers, however, are not one of those places.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: dustsungline on January 25, 2018, 03:12:02 PM
You are spending $200.00 on a scope, There will be some warts. You though are in the cat bird seat.
You have two of the best scopes out there in the price range to choose from. You could have
wasted $200.00 on some department store piece of junk.

I don't have the 6" dob, I have 8" dob and it does collimate.
They do good on all objects for their size and price, the dob does some
things better than the EQ, and the EQ does some things better than the DOB.
I have a scope that has a plastic focuser and it is OK.; It actually has less slop
than my all metal synta focuser. I know one day it might stop working and on that
day, I will get a new focuser and put it on. Newts are simple. BTW it is a $200 scope.

Since these are used just make sure the optics are good. Use the flash light test for the primary.
Some dust might look scarry, but it can be removed. Just make sure there is no hazing,
or scratching of the primary mirror. Same with the secondary.

Some others here with a digital camera might send you a pic of either issues
with mirrors or what a good dusty mirror might look like
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Jay Garcia on January 25, 2018, 10:41:15 PM
Quote
You are spending $200.00 on a scope, There will be some warts. You though are in the cat bird seat.
You have two of the best scopes out there in the price range to choose from. You could have
wasted $200.00 on some department store piece of junk.


The 6" F8 Dobsonian is a very user friendly scope that will put up really nice images of DSOs and planets. That would be my choice, but on a local pickup I think $200 is on the high side. I would be more comfortable $150-$175.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: malphandrafsadd on January 29, 2018, 09:41:46 PM
Quote
Some others here with a digital camera might send you a pic of either issues with mirrors or what a good dusty mirror might look like

Does anyone here have some pics of these issues they could share or a link to a good thread on buying used scopes with pictures etc?<p class="citation">vtornado saidYou are spending $200.00 on a scope,  There will be some warts.[/quote]

Yes, I need to keep this in mind, can't have everything for $200.  At this point I'm now thinking I'll go with the dob.  The rubber grommet issue on the collimation screws bothers me but I likely won't have the scope long enough for that to be a problem.  If I decide to stick with the hobby I'll drop some coin on good equipment before they begin to break down.
I appreciate the input, especially from those of you that have these scopes.  I'll go look at both this weekend and either buy one of them or order one and stop looking at them on the internet.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Mark Patterson on January 30, 2018, 02:54:34 AM
You could ask the seller of these to send you pics of the mirrors.
I usually do when someone is selling a scope. It saves my and their time if there is an issue.
You can post them here and we can have a look at them.
You can also gauge the eagerness of the seller and if they are polite.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: artufanchess on January 31, 2018, 04:30:55 AM
Quote
Quote

Quote
Some others here with a digital camera might send you a pic of either issues with mirrors or what a good dusty mirror might look like

Does anyone here have some pics of these issues they could share or a link to a good thread on buying used scopes with pictures etc?<p class="citation">vtornado said
You are spending $200.00 on a scope, There will be some warts.

Yes, I need to keep this in mind, can't have everything for $200. At this point I'm now thinking I'll go with the dob. The rubber grommet issue on the collimation screws bothers me but I likely won't have the scope long enough for that to be a problem. If I decide to stick with the hobby I'll drop some coin on good equipment before they begin to break down.
I appreciate the input, especially from those of you that have these scopes. I'll go look at both this weekend and either buy one of them or order one and stop looking at them on the internet.

I've not read about any Skywatcher dob's that could not be easily collimated. If the 6" dob has a 2" focuser it is the easy best choice IMO.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: incojukam on January 31, 2018, 11:04:15 AM
Quote
Yes, I need to keep this in mind, can't have everything for $200. At this point I'm now thinking I'll go with the dob. The rubber grommet issue on the collimation screws bothers me but I likely won't have the scope long enough for that to be a problem. If I decide to stick with the hobby I'll drop some coin on good equipment before they begin to break down.
I think that's a wise decision. The Dob is what it is -- a high-quality example of a very simple design. There's a lot less to go wrong than there is with an equatorial-mounted Newtonian. And I doubt you'll be getting rid of this scope ever. If you buy a more expensive one, you will probably find that the 6-inch Dob complements it beautifully. I very much doubt you'll ever have problems with the collimation. Besides, an f/8 scope works flawlessly even when the collimation is pretty far out of whack. F/8 has 2.5 times as much room for error in collimation as f/5.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: tenewbandhams on January 31, 2018, 01:08:04 PM
"Besides, an f/8 scope works flawlessly even when the collimation is pretty far out of whack."

I'd wager that that's a stretch of one's imagination.

"F/8 has 2.5 times as much room for error in collimation as f/5."

If it wasn't for the mediocre Synta focusser, the 6" f/5 would be far and away the very best choice; more versatile in observing the gamut, compact and easily transported.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: planvelsynchcest on February 02, 2018, 01:34:52 PM
The Skywatcher primary cell design does not prevent collimation but it makes the process more difficult than it has to be.

Loosen a collimation screw and instead of the mirror moving up into the tube, the screw will back out of the mirror cell holder while the mirror itself remains stationary. Tighten a collimation screw, and instead of the screw resisting the applied torque in a relatively predictable manner provided by a coil spring under tension, it will tighten with no resistance until the mirror cell contacts and binds up the O ring, which at this point the colllimation screw becomes very difficult to turn.

The collimation screws themselves are incapable of properly locating the mirror. The tiny locking screws actually do most of the work locating and supporting the mirror.

The mirror does not respond in a predictable or linear fashion to collimation screw adjustments.

I also feel a straight through finder is almost impossible to comfortably use on a Newtonian but that is another topic.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: akbrevecop on February 02, 2018, 09:42:15 PM
Dropping in for an update. 
Ended up with the Orion skyview.  The family who was selling the dob decided to keep it and try to use it - the young daughter thought it would be to big to wrangle which is why they thought of selling it in the first place.  I'm happy they decided to keep it, they will probably have lots of fun with it once they get it out of the house.
I ended up with the scope/mount (which was very clean) for $200 and a set of celestron plossl eyepieces (4,6,9,15,25,32mm, 2x barlow, ~10 filters) for $50.  I'm happy overall.
Kinda inadvertently stumbled upon venus and mars (i think) already, so already having some fun.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: scamcackratge on February 03, 2018, 12:17:30 AM
"...so already having some fun."

And that's the only thing that really matters. Congrats!

Pauly
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: Matthew Calhoun on February 03, 2018, 07:19:25 AM
Currently Venus,Mercury , and (I think)Jupiter can be seen in the west just after sunset;Mars and Saturn are near Scorpio.And if you stay up late(get up real early) you can catch Uranus and Neptune in the east.Pluto is in Sagittarius but you'll need a much bigger scope such as a 14" or more.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: cludertypos on February 03, 2018, 01:33:12 PM
Spent a good deal of time watching Saturn last night, that was fun.  Saw Mars for sure and briefy caught a glimpse of one of the planets to the east but didn't catch it quickly enough to get a good view.  Tried to find a couple of the easier M objects but failed.  I don't really know the constellations yet.  Once I put the scope up I located Lyra after a good bit of looking.  Not hard to find but I need to spend more time with the binos just to get an idea of scale/spacing between the stars.  Now that I know what it looks like I'll search for M57 tonight.
Based on looking at out of focus stars it appears the collimation is pretty good but not perfect so I need to tweak that a bit and start learning how to do it.  Any good threads on this forum that detail the procedure for a newtonian like mine?
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: John Jefner on February 09, 2018, 01:57:57 AM
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Ended up with the Orion skyview.
I ended up with the scope/mount (which was very clean) for $200 and a set of celestron plossl eyepieces (4,6,9,15,25,32mm, 2x barlow, ~10 filters) for $50. I'm happy overall.

The Orion 6in/f5 eq3 should be a nice scope for you. Glad everything is in good shape.

I may have the same Celestron (Taiwan) ep kit. I used mine successfully with a 4.5in f8 newtonian and eq for a couple of years before I thought about additions. All of the ep focal lengths were usable with the f8. The barlow gives you the ability to retain the longer eye relief and achieve similar magnification with some of the longer focal length eps. The filters may give you some extra detail.

The eps in the kit are also fine for the f5. 4mm at about 190x and you can barlow the 6mm (125x) for 250x. The barlowed 9mm (87x) for 175x. The 15mm (50x) yields 100x.

Nice scope and kit imo.

Good viewing,

Dave
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: John Newsom on February 09, 2018, 07:45:44 AM
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Dropping in for an update.
Ended up with the Orion skyview. The family who was selling the dob decided to keep it and try to use it - the young daughter thought it would be to big to wrangle which is why they thought of selling it in the first place. I'm happy they decided to keep it, they will probably have lots of fun with it once they get it out of the house.
I ended up with the scope/mount (which was very clean) for $200 and a set of celestron plossl eyepieces (4,6,9,15,25,32mm, 2x barlow, ~10 filters) for $50. I'm happy overall.
Kinda inadvertently stumbled upon venus and mars (i think) already, so already having some fun.


That is an excellent deal! Enjoy your new scope.
Title: Re: Considering 2 (used) reflectors for 1st scope
Post by: lodersconsharp on February 09, 2018, 10:50:35 AM
I can remember when I got interested and hit this forum off the bat. One of the first recommendations...and I still have it...is get the book..."The Backyard Astromers Guide"...a little dated in terms of some equipment but very useful....

That said I asked like everyone else before me and will continue...what scope for x amount of $$$$$

That's the Million Dollar question.....it's sort of like asking..."What first car"......

The first thing...take baby steps is about the best advice. I cannot tell how many bought some wizard goto setup thinking all they had to do was plop it down, hit a button and expect to see dazzling display they saw in some magazine....WRONG...it takes learning, patience, desire, fun and some degree of work.

My firs scope was a used one, which thankfully that was good suggestion versus spending a lot of $$$$ on something new...again like a car...good first one used to get your feet wet. And like "Cars"....they come in all flavors, add-on, knobs, buttons, colors, hardware, etc...and you get what you pay for. Mine which to this day provided some excellent views was a used Orion XT8 Light bucket with some starter eye pieces. I researched on what more I could get out of it and lined the inside with Black self-adhesive felt which did improve it. Since then I moved on &amp; up but that scope was real fun and helped me take "Baby Steps" without going over my head.....just my 2 cents worth....