Author Topic: hello :) :)  (Read 887 times)

hiswacoka

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hello :) :)
« on: December 28, 2017, 08:20:56 PM »
hello! i am hoping someone can give me some advice, as i am very very new to astronomy. i recently joined my local astronomy club, and i want to buy a telescope..but i am not sure what one is best. i have read about so many different types, that i am more confused than i was in the first place.
what would you recommend that is in the 600 dollar range?  i want to buy a more expensive one eventually, but being new to this, i want something relatively inexpensive that i can practice on, i guess. for the time being, i am using my eyes and a star chart, which has been nice so far.



falkwinsliche

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2017, 06:14:22 AM »
Good set of binoculars
Other than that, expand a bit more on what you hope to see and any other factors - such as are you looking to see from your home or take to dark sites. Any physical limitations or concerns with weight lifted. Also do you want to keep using those star charts and learn the sky, or would you prefer a scope that can take you to an object automatically.

Elroy Stockton

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2017, 03:20:17 PM »
i really like the ones with the little remote that can find what you want to look at...and i can see a bit from my house, but i live a few miles from our local observatory, which is good!! i eventually want to try astrophotography.

buddderpdrivla

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2018, 10:51:17 AM »
The scope you will buy for Astrophotography (AP) will be different than the one you will want to start with. Right now focus on learning your equipment and learning your night sky. People who jump into AP (myself included) usually find it to be a big mistake because of the complexity. Starting out, aperture is a critical component. The more aperture you have the more you will see. However that doesn't mean succumb to aperture (like buck) fever. Something that is a large enough size to be enjoyable yet small enough that you won't find excuses to not use it because it is too big or too heavy.In my opinion (and others will agree and disagree  ) with your budget your best option will be the Orion 8" XTi Intelliscope. It is $659, comes with two eyepieces, a computer to tell you where to push the scope to, and will give you the aperture you will want to be able to see the various things out there. It is also small enough to be taken in a car somewhere. And it will allow you to either star hop or use the computer to push the scope to a target. Thus the term Push To. GOTO scopes are nice but you end up paying for the motors and the computer to drive them thus the tripod isn't as robust and the scope isn't as high a quality. The other two things I would suggest are the Pocket Sky Atlas which will show you what is out there by the season and a good quality chair that will allow you to sit and observe. Depending on your height a Cat's Perch chair may be what you need because of the hight of the XTi. I recommend a chair not for your rear end but for your eyes. You see more when you are sitting comfortably.Here is a link to the scope:http://www.telescope...27/p/102012.uts

loraderclot

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2018, 02:46:17 PM »
My advice to you is to not worry about AP right now. AP is a big money pit that you can throw a lot of cash into. It's a lot cheaper to just look at everybody else's photos. Where are you located? Do you have a lot of light pollution there?

salonpeli

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2018, 12:58:15 AM »
dr.who's recommendation is a good one.

Lasaro Tourabi

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2018, 08:09:49 PM »
there is definitely light pollution where i live, but i live right by an observatory, so i plan on going there whenever possible. that one telescope you recommended..do you just set it on the ground?

Teflon Mayorga

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2018, 12:32:18 AM »
An 8" dob, manual, push-to or go-to, is a great choice that will serve you well for many years, long after you stop considering yourself a newbie. A decent set of charts, such as Pocket Sky Atlas or now, Jumbo Pocket Sky Atlas, is also a necessity, along with Sky Safari and Stellarium for your phone. The chair, although not obvious, will be something that will make its value very apparent after the first time you use it. And lastly, a good pair of 10x50 or similar binoculars for for bridging the gap between visual and narrow field of view (view from the eyepiece). This should all be doable for $600 or so, but I would suggest getting some help from the members of the club you just joined, or just come back here as you can save a good deal of money on scopes buying used.
the one most valuable piece of advice I got a long time ago was this - don't buy a scope that is too heavy or too difficult to set up. The best scope is the one you use the most. If it's heavy, difficult to move or difficult or time consuming to set it up, you will find that you will not use it much. And that defeats the whole purpose of having one.
Good luck and don't hesitate to come back here and ask questions!

James Scaturro

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2018, 03:37:29 AM »
Hello, and welcome,

There are really only two types of telescopes: telescopes that use clear lenses, and telescopes that use mirrors. There is also a third, a sub-type, which uses both a lens and mirrors.

Telescopes that use clear lenses are known as refractors. A refractor is what most people picture in their minds when they hear the word "telescope". This is one of my three refractors, a small 60mm(2.4") f/15 achromat...
One looks through a refractor from the very back of the telescope tube. Refractors usually offer a user the sharpest of images, and over all other designs. However, per inch of aperture, refractors are usually the most costly; but they require the least amount of maintenance, and are the most durable of designs.This is my 6" f/5 Newtonian...
One looks through a Newtonian from the side near the front of the tube. Newtonians, or reflectors, use mirrors instead of lenses, and are usually the least expensive of designs, and per inch of aperture. They are the least durable, and require the most maintenance of all, in the form of the process known as collimation, or the realigning of the two mirrors, but they do offer the largest of light-gathering apertures per amount spent; "the biggest bang for the buck", it is often said.

For example, here is a quality 6" f/5 Newtonian for a little over $200...

http://www.highpoint...ly-ota-31057ota

Here is an example of a refractor for about the same cost... http://www.bhphotovi...=y&A=details&Q=

...and at about half the size of the 6" f/5 Newtonian above it. A 6" f/5 Newtonian is powerful, compact, portable and versatile; versatile in that one can observe most everything in the sky, equally and capably, from deep-space objects and vistas to that within the solar system: the Moon and the planets, and comets! A celestial buffet awaits, in other words.The third, the sub-type, is known as a catadioptric, "-dioptric" meaning that the telescope uses two types of optical components: a single corrector lens, and two mirrors. This is a catadioptric known as a Maksutov-Cassegrain...

http://agenaastro.co...CFRCNaQodw5UPPw

Maksutovs are considered "refractor-like", in the quality of their images, and in that one observes from the back of the telescope, the same as with a refractor, but in a more compact tube. Catadioptrics are in between refractors and Newtonians of the same size insofar as cost, maintenance concerns and durability. However, catadioptrics are considered something of a specialty telescope, and for moderate-to-high magnifications of the Moon and the planets mostly, however along with the smaller of deep-sky objects; planetary nebulae, for example.




Ralph Sonberg

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 01:02:50 AM »
If you go with a Dobson-mounted Newtonian, such as the Orion XT8i, be aware of its size and weight; 20 lbs. or so per component(the optical tube and base), and almost 42 lbs. as a whole. It, too, must be collimated on occasion, and for best image quality. Instructions for collimating a Newtonian are found throughout the internet, such as these...

http://www.astro-bab...ation guide.htm

The members of Cloudy Nights, including myself, are also here to help when needed.

Richard Reed

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2018, 11:19:03 AM »
yeah..i was looking at that, it looks really cumbersome!what about something like this? http://www.highpoint...d-powertank
and thank you all SO much, i appreciate it!

Rodinald Richards

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2018, 04:20:20 AM »
Quote
yeah..i was looking at that, it looks really cumbersome!what about something like this? http://www.highpoint...d-powertank
and thank you all SO much, i appreciate it!


Yes, it is, but it's also quite powerful. As for the Celestron 5" you linked to, I do realise how tempting that might be, but the telescope itself would be even less powerful than a 6" Newtonian. You would be paying much more for the mount and its electronics rather than for the telescope itself.

If you're planning on delving into astrophotography in future, then you will need an equatorial mount, and one of sufficient stability. However, I would put the more serious and advanced aspects of that on hold for quite a few years. In the meantime, you can practice upon and introduce yourself to the workings, the mechanics, of an equatorial mount, and a 6" f/5 Newtonian too, and by purchasing this kit instead...

http://www.bhphotovi...=Y&Q=&A=details

It wouldn't have go-to, but one can motorise just the RA axis and track any object once found, keeping same centered in the eyepiece, automatically, and with this...

http://www.telescope...ts?ensembleId=6I take photographs with my 6" f/5 Newtonian simply by holding a small point-and-shoot camera up to an eyepiece, and on the fly. It's known as afocal, or casual astrophotgraphy...
Also, there are web-cams especially for use with telescopes... https://www.youtube....h?v=CeHj6qT5JSE






tioteyclasbeat

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2018, 10:01:15 AM »
Both the computerised mounts and equatorial mounts have a learning curve to surmount. One of the easiest telescopes to use is a small Dobsonian like this...

http://www.telescope...ector-telescope

Or, a 6" f/5 on an alt-azimuth, and as my own...

http://www.highpoint...CFUwkgQod17UDRw
http://agenaastro.co...ltaz-mount.html

You simply move the telescope up and down, and left to right; look at one object for a minute or two, then turn it towards another object in the sky.Then, there's this 4" refractor on an equatorial... http://www.bhphotovi...=Y&Q=&A=details

...but, again, with the learning curve of the equatorial to surmount.

This is also easy to use, but with the go-to to learn... http://www.highpoint...CFRApaQodYewCQg

ecidjapa

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2018, 11:21:55 PM »
thank you all so much!! im going to read up on all of these!

Ray Gibas

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Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2018, 08:54:58 AM »
Quote
Quote

yeah..i was looking at that, it looks really cumbersome!what about something like this? http://www.highpoint...d-powertank
and thank you all SO much, i appreciate it!


Yes, it is, but it's also quite powerful. As for the Celestron 5" you linked to, I do realise how tempting that might be, but the telescope itself would be even less powerful than a 6" Newtonian. You would be paying much more for the mount and its electronics rather than for the telescope itself.

If you're planning on delving into astrophotography in future, then you will need an equatorial mount, and one of sufficient stability. However, I would put the more serious and advanced aspects of that on hold for quite a few years. In the meantime, you can practice upon and introduce yourself to the workings, the mechanics, of an equatorial mount, and a 6" f/5 Newtonian too, and by purchasing this kit instead...

http://www.bhphotovi...=Y&Q=&A=details

i really like that one! honestly, the only reason i am so sold on the electronic ones is because i have absolutely NO idea of how to find things! now tonight, i was able to go outside and find several things with the little chart i have, no problem, but obviously it would be harder to find things you cannot see without a telescope. i found a youtube video, and that one looks really solidly built.