Author Topic: hello :) :)  (Read 765 times)

stimtinpaso

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2018, 04:16:01 PM »
The most important thing of all: don't be in a hurry to purchase a telescope, and given all the possibilities: the types of telescopes, the mounts, etc. The sky isn't going anywhere. The same goes for eyepieces and accessories.

Here is another possibility...

A better quality 127mm Maksutov, and over that of the Celestron go-to kit... http://www.highpoint...cope-ota-s11520

...and paired with an inexpensive alt-azimuth mount... http://www.highpoint...tripod-maz01-00

A 150mm Maksutov wouldn't be much larger, but it would be more powerful yet beyond the stated budget, and could also pair with said alt-azimuth... http://www.highpoint...cope-ota-s11530

With the 150mm, you would then have a truly nice and powerful telescope, and for decades to come.

erexgila

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 136
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2018, 10:32:49 PM »
Would you be comfortable in learning how to collimate a 6" f/5 Newtonian? It's not the beast that it may appear at first, but it is a process to learn and master. This may help explain said process a bit further...

http://www.cloudynig...-ota/?p=6998508

Also, some, if not most, do not like Newtonians on an equatorial, and because the focusser, with the eyepiece inserted, would find itself in odd, awkward observing positions, and where you would need to rotate the optical tube within its tube-rings for more comfortable placement. It's not that difficult, however, with a 6" f/5. A 6" f/5 is not that large and heavy and can be rotated quite easily. You would simply loosen the rings a bit with their finger-bolts, rotate the tube, then tighten the rings back.

Also, an equatorial is not a sweeping or scanning platform, like an alt-azimuth is. It's for observing a single object for an extended period of time, for studying, then moving on to another, more slowly and patiently. By motorising the RA axis, any given object will remain still within the field-of-view of the eyepiece, for hours even if desired.

Equatorials must also be polar-aligned in order to track properly. The RA axis must point to the CNP, or the Celestial North Pole. Fortunately for those of us who live in the northern hemisphere, the north star, Polaris, lies very close to said pole. A compass can also be used to point the mount's RA axis to the CNP, and that would be adequate for visual observations and casual astrophotography.

Here's an example of an even larger, motorised kit in action. The telescope is an 8" f/5 Newtonian, and the equatorial has computerised go-to capability...

https://www.youtube....h?v=VA4eGJjFU1s

A mount of that size and capability would be the minimum required for more serious and advanced astrophotography.

Whilst watching, note how the eyepiece lands in various positions. If there was a refractor or a Maksutov in the Newtonian's place, the eyepiece would not land in as many positions, hence the need to rotate the tube in the case of a Newtonian as described earlier.

Equatorial mounts are connected more to the sky, whilst a simple alt-azimuth is more ground- or Earth-based.

Artavius Murphy

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 113
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2018, 12:06:50 AM »
If you really want a goto mount and you also want to get into astrophotographyin the future, then you could spend $100 extra and get this one: http://www.bhphotovi...uct/440807-REG/ This one comes with a built-in wedge so you could do astrophotography with it (which you would have to spend a lot more money on for accessories & cameras), and it has the goto feature that you said you wanted which in my opinion is very important for a beginner but that's just what i think. Up to you if you want to spend the extra money though.

Anthony Cejudo

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 120
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2018, 01:49:01 AM »
I would always say get something fairly small and inexpensive. I started with a 70mm and still have it and I use it most, it is a, now old, Meade ETX-70.

If the scope is not to be driven or a goto then consider a 70-80mm refractor, you will need a reasonably wide field of view so that objects do not wander out of view too fast. There is an ES, or Bresser, AR 102 around that should be good. What mount you want I am not sure - the more you want the more it costs.

Leave AP out consideration, it is a somewhat specialist area and what is used for visual is not applicable in general to AP. The one item that carries across is a good, big, solid goto equitorial mount as basically it can be used for either application.

Also allow about $150 for extra eyepieces.

unverjacea

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 121
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2018, 10:00:06 PM »
Lot's of great advice here. I'm new and decided on an XT8i but I'm a big guy and can handle it easily. If I were you I'd check out the scopes your fellow astronomy club members are using.

I'm also interested inastrophotography and Sky Muse's photos remind me I don't need much more than the point and shoot cameras I already have.

Kyle Montes

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 135
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2018, 03:17:27 AM »
Does the club that you joined have regular star gazes? Before buying, go to one or two. Talk to folks with a variety of scopes, and look thru them. See if anybody has one similar to what you're thinking of buying. Look thru it, discuss its positive and negative aspects with the owner, if you're there when he/she breaks down, observe the simplicity/complexity of the process, and try to find out the heft & awkwardness of the pieces.

Don't give in too easily & quickly to the "New and shiny - Gotta have-its!" Do as much research as you can.

Good luck, and welcome to the hobby!

Jim H.

Tim Jauregui

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 116
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2018, 05:23:59 PM »
Quote
Does the club that you joined have regular star gazes? Before buying, go to one or two. Talk to folks with a variety of scopes, and look thru them. See if anybody has one similar to what you're thinking of buying. Look thru it, discuss its positive and negative aspects with the owner, if you're there when he/she breaks down, observe the simplicity/complexity of the process, and try to find out the heft & awkwardness of the pieces.

Don't give in too easily & quickly to the "New and shiny - Gotta have-its!" Do as much research as you can.

Good luck, and welcome to the hobby!

Jim H.

+1

reaipasjime

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 107
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2018, 07:47:24 PM »
Quote
Quote

Does the club that you joined have regular star gazes? Before buying, go to one or two. Talk to folks with a variety of scopes, and look thru them. See if anybody has one similar to what you're thinking of buying. Look thru it, discuss its positive and negative aspects with the owner, if you're there when he/she breaks down, observe the simplicity/complexity of the process, and try to find out the heft & awkwardness of the pieces.

Don't give in too easily & quickly to the "New and shiny - Gotta have-its!" Do as much research as you can.

Good luck, and welcome to the hobby!

Jim H.

+1 

+2 for all the right reasons

redoroto

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 114
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2018, 10:27:03 AM »
Quote
*SNIP*

workings, the mechanics, of an equatorial mount, and a 6" f/5 Newtonian too, and by purchasing this kit instead...

http://www.bhphotovi...=Y&Q=&A=details

i really like that one! honestly, the only reason i am so sold on the electronic ones is because i have absolutely NO idea of how to find things! now tonight, i was able to go outside and find several things with the little chart i have, no problem, but obviously it would be harder to find things you cannot see without a telescope. i found a youtube video, and that one looks really solidly built.
[/quote]

I can't add much to the advice equation, others have already given you good direction. I can offer this, however, since I recently bought the scope linked to. That particular scope is a very nice choice, or has been for me. Learning to use an equatorial mount is, IMHO, no more troublesome than learning to use an alt/az or Dobson mounted reflector. What you DO need to be aware of is the weight of this thing. The mount is NOT LIGHT and for someone of a smaller stature, it will be cumbersome to move. I am not a small guy, but I can see where someone smaller than myself might have trouble. It is easily broken down to its components for easier transport of course, but that does add something to the setup time. And that may not be an issue for some. Just be aware of this. Here is a picture to maybe give you some scale...



Please note that I have added an extension to the mount to make viewing with the scope a little easier on my back. I can now stand most of the time when using the scope, which I like. I also leave it set up most of the time and only bring it in if the weather threatens to turn wet. And just for fun, following is a picture of my granddaughter using the scope...



One other thing, do not be afraid to forego the GOTO route... get yourself some proper finder gear and learn to star hop. For me, that is part of the fun of astronomy... keep in mind that neither Galileo nor Sir Isaac had goto scopes!

Best regards and clear skies!

CB

imasatex

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 131
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2018, 07:04:40 PM »
Quote
i really like the ones with the little remote that can find what you want to look at...and i can see a bit from my house, but i live a few miles from our local observatory, which is good!! i eventually want to try astrophotography.

Don't worry about astronomical photography through a telescope when shopping for your first telescope. You'll need to get your bearings first, and astronomical photography places a lot of demands on a telescope of little concern to visual observers. There's telescopes on the market that do well for both visual observingand photographic work, but they are outside of the budget you have. Also, a telescope you can use for imaging the moon and planets is not the same you would want to use for photos of the Andromeda Galaxy or Pleiades in their entirety. It's a steep learning curve in either event. However, once you get your bearings you will find that imaging today is much easier than when I tried it. In the days of film, photography through telescopes was both difficult and expensive.

Taras

Jay Garcia

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2018, 11:15:41 PM »
BTW, an addition to my post above... will you be observing strictly from home, or will you need a more portable rig to go to a darker location, and/or for participating in club outreach?

 If the former, carry-out weight & complexity of assembly are factors to be considered. If the latter, size of components vs. size of car (& door openings) may come into finding the 'right answer'; also power requirements for goto & dew control.

Again, good luck!

Jim H.

Jason Pederes

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 129
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: hello :) :)
« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2018, 09:11:10 AM »
Quote
there is definitely light pollution where i live, but i live right by an observatory, so i plan on going there whenever possible. that one telescope you recommended..do you just set it on the ground?
Yes. Technically it is a Newtonian telescope on a alt/az Dobsonian base. But it's just called a Dob or Dobsonian after John Dobson who invented it. He wanted a telescope that performed well but was affordable and easy to use.