Author Topic: help picking a real scope  (Read 689 times)

proporasat

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2018, 12:58:21 PM »
Quote
Note that he refers to the 2.9 as an upgrade over the 8 inch. It was. AP is just not very intuitive.


My personal experience echoes that same conclusion. You will want different rigs for visual and AP. Period.

Can both do both, yes, but you will become very frustrated, quickly.

pernogori

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2018, 05:01:58 AM »
Thank you all so much for welcoming me and all the different advice! I think I am going to go with the 9.25 celestron. Its too good of a price, the go to will be wonderful and the views should still be pretty amazing I hope. That leaves some money for...? Lol I do have a small assortment of celestron lenses and filters. So maybe a focal reducer or dew shield. Any other must have accessories for a sct?

keylozelbou

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2018, 12:03:09 AM »
The C9.25 on the CG-5 will be overloaded, as in it will vibrate excessively when you touch it (like to focus it). This will be come frustrating very quickly as most of your observing time will be spent waiting for the scope to stop wiggling.

A motorized focuser is one way to focus while avoiding touching the scope. More money, but it's a way to squeeze a few more pounds out of a mount.

Good luck and let us know how it goes!

jingdilenma

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2018, 03:25:01 AM »
Quote
Well let's say I throw AP out the window and just enjoy the visual side of it. May take some pictures with my phone mount. Lol From the sound of it astrophotrography sounds more and more like its an advanced/learned technique. So if I only focused on visual observing, what would be the best option. Everyone seems to have varying opinions. I thought aperture was everything?


Hello, and welcome,

First, it would help to know if you live under dark, or light-polluted skies; big city, suburbs, small town, or rural? Knowing such helps a lot in making suggestions.

You can have a lot of fun observing, and doing afocal or webcam(video) astrophotography on the side. Afocal astrophotography is simply holding a camera up to an eyepiece and snapping a shot. I do it all the time, and with this 6" f/5 Newtonian on a simple, manual alt-azimuth mount...

Here are some of the shots I've taken over the past six months, afocally, and with a small point-and-shoot camera(Canon S110), again, held up to the eyepiece...To take ideal afocal astrophotographs, an equatorial with just the RA axis motorised would serve to automatically track any object and hold it steady in the field-of-view of the eyepiece. A go-to equatorial at a good price would be even better perhaps...

http://www.bhphotovi...equatorial.html

It's currently $20 off the price listed within the link, and is better mechanically than the Celestron Advanced VX, or AVX.

Then, the telescope itself, for observing with eyepieces, and for afocal and webcam astrophotography...

http://www.highpoint...CFVE7gQodl7cLYQ

Reviews of same...

http://www.chuckhawk...T150_scopes.htm
http://www.cloudynig...i-xlt-150-r1623

A 6" f/5 or 8" f/5 Newtonian makes for a great all-around telescope for visual; for wide-field, low-to-moderate-power observations of deep-sky objects and vistas; and moderate-to-high-power observations of the Moon, the planets, double-stars and the smaller deep-sky objects, up close.

The Bresser Exos-2GT can also handle the next size up: an 8" f/5 Newtonian...

http://www.khanscope...?productID=2731

Here's an 8" f/5 Newtonian on a go-to equatorial in action... https://www.youtube....h?v=VA4eGJjFU1s

Take advantage of the weaker Canadian dollar, and an f/5 parabola. A spherical mirror can wait, and in the form of a Maksutov-Newtonian or Cassegrain instead.










grountentaybrig

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2018, 05:35:42 AM »
Quote
Thank you all so much for welcoming me and all the different advice! I think I am going to go with the 9.25 celestron. Its too good of a price, the go to will be wonderful and the views should still be pretty amazing I hope. That leaves some money for...? Lol I do have a small assortment of celestron lenses and filters. So maybe a focal reducer or dew shield. Any other must have accessories for a sct?


A 9.25" Schmidt, with a focal-length of 2350mm, will simulate, sort of, a 7" f/13 planetary refractor. A 32mm ocular is the usual low-power eyepiece within most kits, and would give a magnification of 73x. The same in an 8" f/5(1000mm) Newtonian gives an airy 31x; and a binocular-like 23x in my 6" f/5(750mm).

The light-path within a Cassegrain -- whether a Schmidt, Maksutov, classical or Gregorian -- is folded into three sections, like this...

https://starizona.co...s/sct_scope.jpg

The 9.25" SCT's optical tube is therefore only a third the length, and for portability. The tube length can be an illusion, perhaps leading some, or many, to think that it'll give nice wide-field deep-sky views. Rather, it will serve as a celestial "microscope".

If said SCT's focal-length were unfolded, and into the tube of said 7" refractor, it would actually be at least 7" longer than this one... http://fullerscopes....gress-6_26.html

There's more to a telescope than just its aperture, or "eye".

malphandrafsadd

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2018, 04:15:38 PM »
What I found when using a C9.25 was that the field of view was really, really narrow, like a drinking straw. Made finding stuff hard, even with GoTo. There's a Meade 10" with LXD-55 mount for $650 on Astromart.. pickup only though. One approach is, buy the C9.25 + CG-5 for the $900, then turn around and sell the C9.25 for $600 (watch out for shipping costs).

I do not recommend newtonians on an EQ mount, unless you have Harry Houdini's neck.

My vote goes to the good old 8" f/5 or f/6 dob. You can probably get a used one for $300. I find the 8" to be the most convenient, the 10" less so and the 12" even less. Sure the dob has no tracking, but it has a fairly modest focal length making using it quite easy.

Early on there is the temptation to buy "the biggest you can afford" but this quickly gives way to "I don't want to bust a hernia again." This is why I bought a 13.1" mirror with vast ambitions, only to sell it in disgrace without ever building a scope around it. The hobby becomes more of a chore when you're hauling stuff in and out.

If you manage to get rid of the C9.25 you will only be out $300 for the mount, another $300 for the dob, leaving you almost $1000 to buy a nice 80mm ED refractor ($300 - $400) as well as all the bits and pieces you need to put together an astrophotography rig.

Or, forget the dob, and sell/trade the C9.25 for a C8. There's not that much difference in light-gathering power but the C9.25 weighs 50% more than the C8. You stand a better chance of successful astrophotography with a C8 and CG-5, more so if you get the 0.5X Optec reducer for the C8 to halve its focal length.

Mike Heck

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2018, 12:55:41 AM »
starhunter,
Welcome!

Use your "leftover" funds for an 80ED OTA,which you can then use for wider visual views and AP ,first on the cg5 mount you just bought,and later on a more AP-friendlier(expensive but REALLY accurate) mount.The great thing about the dovetail is it allows scope swapping on the mounts so easily.

Matthew Calhoun

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2018, 01:01:19 AM »
Note: the Barska 80ED triplet is now available direct from Barska on ebay at $499 with free shipping. I have owned one for a couple years and like it. When comparing brands pay attention to accessories included(or NOT) in the prices.Rings and dovetail can add another $100 if bought separately.

Elijah York

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #23 on: January 23, 2018, 03:36:10 AM »
Quote
Well let's say I throw AP out the window and just enjoy the visual side of it. May take some pictures with my phone mount. Lol From the sound of it astrophotrography sounds more and more like its an advanced/learned technique. So if I only focused on visual observing, what would be the best option. Everyone seems to have varying opinions. I thought aperture was everything?

Quote

Thank you all so much for welcoming me and all the different advice! I think I am going to go with the 9.25 celestron. Its too good of a price, the go to will be wonderful and the views should still be pretty amazing I hope. That leaves some money for...? Lol I do have a small assortment of celestron lenses and filters. So maybe a focal reducer or dew shield. Any other must have accessories for a sct?


Let me try to make just a bit more sense of it all for you.

Aperture is important for visual use (not so much for photography, in fact it can hurt you, because long focal length hurts you).

But, even visually, a big scope can have its problems. People have talked about the need to have it mounted well, on an inadequate mount, you just won't get the scope you're paying for. Orlyandico has pointed out the drawbacks of a limited field of view.

The easiest, and often used, solution to all this for the beginner is a fast (low F number) Dobsonian. You generally give up GOTO, but the wide angle view makes that less important. Following your title, it's a "real scope", by any definition. Aperture, at the lowest possible cost, in both dollars and ease of use. A bit bulky to move around.

If GOTO and/or compactness is a must have, look at the Celestron NexSE line of scopes. They're mounted "good enough" for visual.

Or, at the high end, the scope/mount below has a lot of appeal. An 8 inch SCT on a mount good enough for both the 8 visually, and with a small refractor, astrophotography. The mount can be used interchangably for other scopes, they all mount using the mounting plate ("dovetail") you can see in the picture. You could use the 8 for visual, and swap it with a small refractor (nothing over 600mm) for starting out in astrophotography. That would be an excellent way to do both.

http://www.celestron...rized-telescope

It's all a matter of costs (both dollars and other, the last setup is 88 pounds total, pretty heavy to move around, you move it in pieces) and personal preferences. Read what everybody is saying (including this) simply for the information contained. But then you have to make up your own mind.

Just realize that the mount is an important part of the system, more so for photography. Your eyes are forgiving of small tracking errors, the camera isn't. And realize it's all about pros and cons of individual choices, there is no perfect solution for every astronomer.

Colin Ramadan

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2018, 04:57:08 AM »
I'm sure u know this old addage:  the best scope for u is the scope u will most use.  So, consider things such as size, and set up time  which increases expotentionally the more complicated your setup.  Also, stability is a key; the scope MUST BE PROPERLY SUPPORTED.    Consider ur primary observing location.  If far away, than size of scope and portability is a factor.   Another impt point is your interest; what do u prefer to observe?
I would suggest going with a more simple scope.  One who's complicated functions does not exceed the act of observing.  If that occurs, many give up.  Once u decide on a type of scope, Than subtract some of your money for accessories such as an extra eyepiece or two, a barlow, a filter, etc.  This might come to three or four hundred dollars. 
Don't let this process paralyze you.   We used to call this syndrome,  "analyzes paralyses". 
Just enjoy the process.  If it gets difficult or jumbled I your head, just step away for a while.

Terrance Station

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #25 on: January 23, 2018, 08:47:39 AM »
Quote
Well let's say I throw AP out the window and just enjoy the visual side of it. May take some pictures with my phone mount. Lol From the sound of it astrophotrography sounds more and more like its an advanced/learned technique. So if I only focused on visual observing, what would be the best option. Everyone seems to have varying opinions. I thought aperture was everything?

I've been doing visual for 30 years, I just tried taking a picture with my phone, lol

tioteyclasbeat

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2018, 11:35:40 AM »
Personally I would recommend an 8" SCT or Dob.
But this may sound odd, but the dob will most likely be easier to move, you can even put it on a hand cart and roll it in one piece.
Personally I like the SCT, but its a bit more work to set up. YMMV

laycacdownsell

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2018, 08:27:28 PM »
Hey Laika:   I think your spot on.  An 8" DOB is highly portable.   Usually the entire setup, scope and mount weighs about 30 to 35 lbs.  A normally healthy person should be able do lug it around.  Now it's not exactly light, and most truly grab and go setups weight less, but the DOB has some great advantages. 
I consider my 8" DOB to be the most versitle scope own.  If I had to choose one scope I would go with that DOB.  It has enough aperature for many DSOs, as well as the planets.   At an F6 it's not bad on EPs.  And as a DOB it will be a stable platform. 
The cost is minimal, so much that one might consider a COL, the computer object locater from Orion or the GoTo DOB that they now sell.

Alex Manuel

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2018, 11:49:55 PM »
Quote
1. Do you have enough ROOM to store the scope when not in use?
2. If you have to CARRY the scope up a flight of stairs, or LIVE in a apartment?
3. Do you have enough ROOM in a auto to transport the telescope?
4. If new to astronomy try a pair of binoculars and maybe a 6"to start out with.
Just a few questions you need to ask your self.
Also take your time, there is plenty of good used scope that come up CN, if possible try
the scope out before buying, you can get a good reasonable buy here and save some money
for maybe a good eyepiece.

I would like the OP to at least answer the first three questions.

selfjomargast

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Re: help picking a real scope
« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2018, 01:21:23 AM »
If you're strictly interested in visual and not AP an 8" or 9.25" SCT might be a good option, especially for your budget. You get tracking, goto, and lightweight/portability. Alignment takes less than 5 minutes in my experience then you're set for the night.