Author Topic: I live in a high rise building in the city, best option for DSO?  (Read 338 times)

Gilbert Quintana

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Re: I live in a high rise building in the city, best option for DSO?
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2018, 10:27:24 PM »
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Relative to your rent, this setup is cheap. I'd suggest a Celestron Evolution 8" and Atik Infinity real-time camera. The Atik Infinity is in category considered Video Astronomy or EAA which can capture dim objects in seconds. Astrophtography generally requires hours of eposure, so EAA is not in that category.  EAA is considered enhanced real-time observing. You can see things like this with EAA.

You know your city's cost of living is out of control when someone halfway across the country beings it up on a forum like this. Haha!

You're right, and after "sleeping on it" I decided to hold off on a telescope for 4 months til spring and spend around $1,500-$1,800 on a scope and mount.

Read articles about Engineers sleeping in their cars in the park there, and rent being over $2500. If you can afford that, you can afford a good telescope.  Reconsider the wait. Most view winter as best time to observe. With EAA setup you can observe indoors remotely with cables running out to balcony to; control scope, control camera, and return video.

There is a EAA forum on this site where you can learn all your options. I should have suggested a C14 on a Paramont mount with an A7 camera.  The beauty of EAA is you don't have to spend that kind of money. The fast exposure times allow low cost mounts. My bottom line setup cost less than $600 for everything, but I'd recommend at least an Evolution 8" to make life easier.

ndesevtenzio

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Re: I live in a high rise building in the city, best option for DSO?
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2018, 11:46:49 PM »
Hmmmm, 22nd floor above the fog, east facing balcony viewing? I would throw a small APO refractor into the mix. It will make a great imaging platform and travel scope. I am a fan of SCTs but the balcony will have some shakes with movement and limited sky views most nights there. A smaller, high quality grab-n-go might make good sense.

safrioheartli

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Re: I live in a high rise building in the city, best option for DSO?
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2018, 06:51:18 AM »
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Relative to your rent, this setup is cheap. I'd suggest a Celestron Evolution 8" and Atik Infinity real-time camera. The Atik Infinity is in category considered Video Astronomy or EAA which can capture dim objects in seconds. Astrophtography generally requires hours of eposure, so EAA is not in that category.  EAA is considered enhanced real-time observing. You can see things like this with EAA.

You know your city's cost of living is out of control when someone halfway across the country beings it up on a forum like this. Haha!

You're right, and after "sleeping on it" I decided to hold off on a telescope for 4 months til spring and spend around $1,500-$1,800 on a scope and mount.

Read articles about Engineers sleeping in their cars in the park there, and rent being over $2500. If you can afford that, you can afford a good telescope. 

$2500 rent in parts of Silicon Valley where the schools are good is considered cheap. Over $4000 for a two bedroom apartment is more like it.

Dan Perez

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Re: I live in a high rise building in the city, best option for DSO?
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2018, 07:55:49 AM »
Quote
Quote

Relative to your rent, this setup is cheap. I'd suggest a Celestron Evolution 8" and Atik Infinity real-time camera. The Atik Infinity is in category considered Video Astronomy or EAA which can capture dim objects in seconds. Astrophtography generally requires hours of eposure, so EAA is not in that category.  EAA is considered enhanced real-time observing. You can see things like this with EAA.

You know your city's cost of living is out of control when someone halfway across the country beings it up on a forum like this. Haha!

You're right, and after "sleeping on it" I decided to hold off on a telescope for 4 months til spring and spend around $1,500-$1,800 on a scope and mount.

Read articles about Engineers sleeping in their cars in the park there, and rent being over $2500. If you can afford that, you can afford a good telescope.  [/quote]

$2500 rent in parts of Silicon Valley where the schools are good is considered cheap. Over $4000 for a two bedroom apartment is more like it.[/quote]
 

Let's just say I***wish*** I was paying $2,500 for my 1,000 sq ft. two bedroom two bath...

And I'm not an engineer. There are other well paying fields in the Silicon Valley other than engineering! 

I'll check out the EAA subforum. But is it safe to say that a SCT is the way to go? I'm seeing differing opinions here.

firorectve

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Re: I live in a high rise building in the city, best option for DSO?
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2018, 01:38:28 PM »
Quote
Quote

Relative to your rent, this setup is cheap. I'd suggest a Celestron Evolution 8" and Atik Infinity real-time camera. The Atik Infinity is in category considered Video Astronomy or EAA which can capture dim objects in seconds. Astrophtography generally requires hours of eposure, so EAA is not in that category.  EAA is considered enhanced real-time observing. You can see things like this with EAA.

You know your city's cost of living is out of control when someone halfway across the country beings it up on a forum like this. Haha!

You're right, and after "sleeping on it" I decided to hold off on a telescope for 4 months til spring and spend around $1,500-$1,800 on a scope and mount.

Read articles about Engineers sleeping in their cars in the park there, and rent being over $2500. If you can afford that, you can afford a good telescope.  [/quote]

$2500 rent in parts of Silicon Valley where the schools are good is considered cheap. Over $4000 for a two bedroom apartment is more like it.[/quote]
 

Let's just say I***wish*** I was paying $2,500 for my 1,000 sq ft. two bedroom two bath...

And I'm not an engineer. There are other well paying fields in the Silicon Valley other than engineering! 

I'll check out the EAA subforum. But is it safe to say that a SCT is the way to go? I'm seeing differing opinions here.[/quote]

I would say a refractor is best for DSO's, but in a light-polluted SF Bay Area, you want as much aperture as possible. Dobs are too big and bulky and it might be hard to find some of the fainter DSO's easily (an intelliscope solves this problem to a certain degree, but do you really want to lug a dob downstairs when traveling to a dark site?). A SCT offers aperture in a portable form factor plus they are easy to use with a GOTO mount.

cromsotejbi

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Re: I live in a high rise building in the city, best option for DSO?
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2018, 05:17:17 PM »
Quote
Quote

Relative to your rent, this setup is cheap. I'd suggest a Celestron Evolution 8" and Atik Infinity real-time camera. The Atik Infinity is in category considered Video Astronomy or EAA which can capture dim objects in seconds. Astrophtography generally requires hours of eposure, so EAA is not in that category.  EAA is considered enhanced real-time observing. You can see things like this with EAA.

You know your city's cost of living is out of control when someone halfway across the country beings it up on a forum like this. Haha!

You're right, and after "sleeping on it" I decided to hold off on a telescope for 4 months til spring and spend around $1,500-$1,800 on a scope and mount.

Read articles about Engineers sleeping in their cars in the park there, and rent being over $2500. If you can afford that, you can afford a good telescope.  [/quote]

$2500 rent in parts of Silicon Valley where the schools are good is considered cheap. Over $4000 for a two bedroom apartment is more like it.[/quote]
 

Let's just say I***wish*** I was paying $2,500 for my 1,000 sq ft. two bedroom two bath...

And I'm not an engineer. There are other well paying fields in the Silicon Valley other than engineering! 

I'll check out the EAA subforum. But is it safe to say that a SCT is the way to go? I'm seeing differing opinions here.[/quote]

Definitely check out the EAA forum. Astrophotographers like refractors for super sharp image. The smaller aperture adds to exposure time, but when you are taking dozens of hours of exposures for one pic, its not an issue. An EAA camera has high sensitivity and low resolution that won't exploit the sharpness of a refractor. EAA is about speed to see things near real-time so more aperture is better. An 8" SCT is as big as one can handle without being too heavy. If you get something to big or heavy chances are you won't use it. An 8" SCT is also considered the "goldilocks size" for visual too.

Astrophotography is typically; expensive, time consuming, long learning curve, and not real-time
EAA is typically; can be inexpensive, relatively quick, fast learning curve, and near real-time results

Tony Patton

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Re: I live in a high rise building in the city, best option for DSO?
« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2018, 10:54:11 PM »
I concur with doing EAA from your location. You can buy a much more portable scope and effectively triple the aperture by using an EAA camera like a Revolution R2. Your back and legs will thank you assuming your car isn't parked right by the elevator when you decide take it to dark skies. Also, I don't know how big your balcony is but you can rapidly run out of room with a huge rig. The camera I'm recommending comes with everything you need (light pollution filter, focal reducer, nice color display, cables, battery, and camera).

I wouldn't suggest this if I didn't own one myself and it is amazing. I started imaging with what could be the worst possible scope to use for EAA (tiny 4 " f/12 Maksutov) and still got terrific results from within the city limits and a lot of light pollution. I have since upgraded to a nice 80mm apochromatic carbon fiber triplet refractor (5 lbs) and get great results on DSO's, planets, and the moon from my light polluted driveway. I have no need for a heavy German equatorial mount. I use mine with a simple Celestron SLT alt/az goto mount that weighs about 15lbs. The whole thing weighs almost nothing. and can be moved with one hand. A 5" or 6" SCT is very good too. When you are not using the camera, you can still see a lot with a scope that is quite portable.

My suggestion would be to buy a nice small refractor, a good goto mount, and this little camera system or a similar one. EAA is the only way to see colors live in DSO's unless you have a titanic/gigantic Dobsonian. My buddy's 18" Dob doesn't even show colors...but my 3" refractor certainly does with this camera.

http://www.revolutionimager.com/