Author Topic: I want to see planets better. What eyepieces should I get?  (Read 687 times)

noerivatat

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 154
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: I want to see planets better. What eyepieces should I get?
« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2018, 01:35:37 AM »
Most mentioned how the seeing conditions is what most effects viewing of the planets. Some nights in my 8" SCT f/2000mm I can only use about 125x because of poor seeing conditions. On a good night, 180x and on a great night 225x. So to find out if it will be a good night of seeing for the planets, I go to the website, Clear Sky Chart. They will tell you by your location, the seeing and transparency for the night. I just looked up the conditions for here in NC and I have a 5/5 for transparency and a 4/5 for seeing conditions for tonight. The scope will be going out!

Anyway, I wasn't sure if the OP was aware of this valuable website?

Clear skies all:)

gatawestwall

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 124
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: I want to see planets better. What eyepieces should I get?
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2018, 05:36:41 AM »
Quote
Quote

26mm Meade came with etc 125
9.7mm " "
9.4mm spears Waller I bought
I also have a 2 x barlow

zoom ep? What is a must have ep?

I just went through the whole discussion. I don't think you ever told us what was wrong with the view you had of the planets now.

We have been focused on magnification, as that is usually what needs to be boosted.

However, that may not be your concern since you do have a 2X barlow.

If we could wave the magic wand, how would we improve your planetary views?
Size
brightness?
image shimmer?
Won't hold focus?
Glow?
Color?
What are we trying to fix?

( should have asked this in my first post.  )

Edit: also what is your light pollution like, in the sky and on the ground.
If I had a magic wand I would live out of town with less light pollution. I'm looking for more detail in the planets, color. Also, I want to learn about this scope and upgrade to something bigger like a 10 or even a 14 inch. I know about objects in the sky and angles give more soup. Focus on this scope is easy. My ultimate goal is to see nebula and galaxies but that'snot going to happen with the 125 ETX. BTW I'm doing AP with my Nikon but that'sa subject for another forum and thread. Here is a video I did of Saturn with out tracking and sped up.
I also did a live broadcast of the eclipse on Facebook (i want to do many more lives) that had over 10,200 views.

Saturn https://www.youtube....h?v=N4ulKskcwbY

Jayarajan Mcloven

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 127
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: I want to see planets better. What eyepieces should I get?
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2018, 06:40:56 AM »
Quote
I will add ..

How well is you scope Collimated ?

Can you see steady circular diffraction rings
Not just out-of-focus fresnel rings, but diffraction rings.

If the image from scope is terrible, then no amount of magnification will fix that

One of the first things I checked was how well it was collimated. It looks fine when I look into the tube from the eyepiece slot and the spider cross looks perfect to my old eyes.

monsresiwor

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 131
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: I want to see planets better. What eyepieces should I get?
« Reply #33 on: February 09, 2018, 07:32:47 AM »
Quote
Its a great planetary scope but only 125 I dont think its out of collimation but a 125 will only give 150x generally so your eyepieces are fine DONT SPEND MORE get a bigger scope

Thatsin the plan

Cesar Rojas

  • Active Astronomer
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
  • Activity:
    0%
  • Reputation: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: I want to see planets better. What eyepieces should I get?
« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2018, 09:49:12 AM »
Quote
Quote

SonnyE,

I will note that you signature says you are using an Orion ED80T, 480 mm FL.  At 3X that would be like it was 1440 mm FL.  If you stacked a 2X barlow on top of that it would take you to 2880 mm FL equivalent.

Remaxman's scope is 1900 mm FL before using a barlow. With a 2X barlow it would take him to 3800 mm equivalent.  A 3X barlow would take his scope to the equivalent of a 5700 mm FL.

Just providing some context.  Your experience would be very different from what he would see.

My experiences are very different from anybodies.
I'm an imager. I have a smattering of Optical's. But not my primary interest. They were tools for my learning curve.
Nor do I care about the math, only my results.
As a retired old fart, I'm primarily out there to enjoy myself.
It still stands that if one has options, they could try them. Stacking my Barlow's, although bottom end, sure gave the family a thrill with their first live view of Saturn.
Made a warm memory. And truly, none complained about image degradation. I noticed it, but none of them did.

But my primary interest is pulling down Nebula images. Hence, my choice of a telescope well suited to that end.
I knew my goal, before I ordered anything.

And as Paul Harvey used to say, "And now you know.... the rest of the Story. Good Day."
Paul also says "Page 2". I'm also into photography big time and have been doing a lot of Astro P.