Author Topic: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby  (Read 1287 times)

bullgidava

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2018, 05:59:33 AM »
Now that we know he is three, let me direct you to a post I did a while back that might be relevant.

Getting Kids involved in Astronomy - Cloudy Nights
http://www.cloudynig...d-in-astronomy/

If Daddy got binoculars and he has his own binoculars the two of you could have so much fun together with birds and boats and astronomy. As he learns to use binoculars he will be more ready for a telescope. Take a look at the discussion above.

Here are some kids binoculars that might be fun for a 3 year old. Looking at stars in any serious manner might be a challenge but looking at birds or boats in the harbor with these might work.
http://www.amazon.co...en's binoculars

luseatcidood

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2018, 06:40:39 AM »
I agree that binoculars are a great way to start kids on learning the sky. I have a pair of inexpensive 7x35 that I let kids and adults use while they wait their turn to look at the scope. They are amazed on how many more stars they can see

here is a link to the pair I have
http://www.amazon.co...R49VW111PNVEKEZ

brascharnide

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2018, 07:39:41 AM »
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Again, Thanks for all the suggestions. I've purchased a planisphere that Viking 1 recommended. Also, I purchased a planetarium from smithsonian to get my 3 year old son's brain flowing. Hopefully this will be the start of him and I building life long memories together.

I see that clearwaterdave (post #18) said what I was going to say. I've never seen these books, but since you're looking, and since your son is three, perhaps the books by Rey willbe what you're looking for. I know my kids liked the Curious George stories...

globleferep

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2018, 02:18:10 PM »
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Again, Thanks for all the suggestions. I've purchased a planisphere that Viking 1 recommended. Also, I purchased a planetarium from smithsonian to get my 3 year old son's brain flowing. Hopefully this will be the start of him and I building life long memories together.

I see that clearwaterdave (post #18) said what I was going to say. I've never seen these books, but since you're looking, and since your son is three, perhaps the books by Rey willbe what you're looking for. I know my kids liked the Curious George stories...

Actually Jack, H A Rey's astronomy books are a little older level than Curious George... I don't think the three year old will be reading them himself or anything...

But they ARE exactly what these folks need anyway, I think. They are a great introduction to the sky, and I consulted themheavily for myquite well-received class on learning the sky that Itaught at the site on Saturday.

Abdullahi Archer

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #19 on: January 14, 2018, 02:35:10 AM »
I'm too old and cantankerous to break in a new father.......

at three, there's not much to do except let him take a peek or just lay in the grass pointing out the "pictures in the sky".....which will come in handy as he gets older....a set of binoculars for these sessions might be useful. At this age, it's a good time to introduce him on how to handle and take care of the equipment, but mostly at this age, it's about spending time with them that's important....

Antonio Stanton

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2018, 03:47:40 AM »
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Actually Jack, H A Rey's astronomy books are a little older level than Curious George... I don't think the three year old will be reading them himself or anything...

But they ARE exactly what these folks need anyway, I think. They are a great introduction to the sky, and I consulted themheavily for myquite well-received class on learning the sky that Itaught at the site on Saturday.
I was thinking more about writing style than actual content...

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but mostly at this age, it's about spending time with them that's important....

Agreed. As much as possible because it seems like by tomorrow they won't be interested in anything you are and then you'll have to feign interest in what they like if you ever want to see them.

John Weiland

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2018, 11:28:16 PM »
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For a book, try Turn Left at Orion: http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/0521153972

Also try the free software Stellarium: http://www.stellarium.org/
It shows you the sky as it looks from where you live. Obviously if you start it in the day, it will show you the sun and blue sky. Fast forward to after sunset.

Ya know, I seen this book recommended a 100+ times for beginners and never bought it. After browsing through it on Amazon, I realize that it's more than a beginners book and is for everyone. I'm in this hobby for over 40 years now and I think I'm going to buy a copy. I have quite a few of astro books and magazines, but I like the way these pages are set up.

Oh and +1 on stellarium, I use it all the time to get an idea of what's up and will look at that night. After you get your feet wet and familiar with the sky, a good astro-App for your smart phone would be a good idea.

Michael Hobbs

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2018, 08:51:51 AM »
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For a book, try Turn Left at Orion: http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/0521153972

Also try the free software Stellarium: http://www.stellarium.org/
It shows you the sky as it looks from where you live. Obviously if you start it in the day, it will show you the sun and blue sky. Fast forward to after sunset.


Rather than retype it let me say that I would have made this same suggestion. I use Stellarium almost every day. And TLAO will set your expectation properly as what things will actually look like in binoculars and in a telescope. They don't look like the Hubble telescope pictures.

I started with 10X50 binoculars and spent 2 months laying out in the yard looking up at the sky and getting to know what was up there. It was exciting to start to recognize things and to feel acquainted with the stars as I walked out my front door. 10 X50s are the best for hand held. Don't be tempted to go to higher mag as you get too much shake in the image at higher mag and some people prefer 7 or 8X.

If you have the money you can get some really niceones for about $100 BUT my first pair cost me $25 from Harbor Freight. Inexpensive and Harbor Freight often has coupons so you can get them for $20. With these you can see a lot more than you can with the naked eye. I just sold mine to a friend for $10 to help him get going. I may get another pair.
http://www.harborfre...lars-94527.html

My other companion under the stars was a Planisphere. Your son will likely prefer something for the phone or tablet, like SkEye, but I found the planisphere great!
http://www.amazon.co..._=sr_1_3&sr=8-3

The binoculars will not go to waste once you get your telescope. I have 3 telescopes and I use my binoculars as much as the telescopes. For quick 10-15 minute sessions, for travel, you can't beat binoculars and they are great for daytime use too.
Ed, are you strapping your phone or tablet to your Dob to use Skeye as a push-to scope? I heard about doing that and I have a Dob too.

hanatuaser

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2018, 09:02:03 AM »
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Ed, are you strapping your phone or tablet to your Dob to use Skeye as a push-to scope? I heard about doing that and I have a Dob too.
No I am not. My pushto on my dob is via the Orion Intelliscope feature of the XT8i. I have heard of people trying to do that but from what I hear it is not accurate enough. Plus, the metal tube can throw the compass of the phone off.

Greg Quevedo

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2018, 04:03:39 AM »
Regardless of what books, binoculars or telescope you may get, just keep learning together and you'll enjoy it as much (or more) than he does. I really enjoyed my son's company under the stars as he was growing up. In his late teens, he wasn't as interested in heading out for weekend camping/astronomy trips, but even now that he's in his twenties, if he's around when I'm observing, he always is interested in spending some time.

We have a few father/son teams who attend our club meetings and our star parties and they really seem to enjoy spending time together with the hobby. Hope you have as much fun as they do!

tyrrcencifunc

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2018, 07:15:50 AM »
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Ed, are you strapping your phone or tablet to your Dob to use Skeye as a push-to scope? I heard about doing that and I have a Dob too.
What I have heard of people doing successfully is attaching a magnetic digital angle gauge to the tube of the Dobsonian scope. Perhaps something like this:http://www.sears.com...1&blockType=G11Then using a compass to work in combination with Alt/Az coordinates from Stellarium or SkEye or one of the others. I don't know how accurate this is but it should get you into the correct area or at least confirm that you are in the correct part of the sky.

Tim Massey

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2018, 11:13:06 PM »
Ok so my amateur side is starting to show. The planisphere I ordered is for the Northern hemisphere, and it's for 30-40 deg northern latitude. I'm in Texas (Houston). Will this work????

Devon Dank

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #27 on: January 30, 2018, 08:08:21 AM »
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Ok so my amateur side is starting to show. The planisphere I ordered is for the Northern hemisphere, and it's for 30-40 deg northern latitude. I'm in Texas (Houston). Will this work????

Houston is at 29.5N. It should work. You won't notice half a degree visually.

Omar Manning

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2018, 03:08:30 PM »
hello all, I know I have a lot of questions but the vast amount of information y'all have shared I truly appreciate. Just an update. I took my planisphere outside tonight. I had trouble looking north for some reason so i decided to face south. I found my first star. It was Sirius. I had to utilize YouTube in order to find out how to use my planisphere though.

James Runninger

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Re: Learning a new Father/Son Hobby
« Reply #29 on: February 03, 2018, 08:05:06 AM »
Also, I looked a bit West and found orion's belt