Author Topic: Member Title?  (Read 1372 times)

Cory Bass

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Re: Member Title?
« Reply #30 on: February 03, 2018, 02:09:48 AM »
Although getting a bit afield of the original topic, folks might find amusing a couple of now mainly forgotten tales concerning events of the very early Space Age.

As the Free World watched the attempted U.S. launch of the first Vanguard on live TV, just two seconds after lift-off we saw the rocket hesitate...

"As it settled [back] the fuel tanks ruptured and exploded, destroying the rocket and severely damaging the launch pad. The Vanguard satellite was thrown clear and landed on the ground a short distance away with its transmitters still sending out a beacon signal." - Wikipedia

As the tiny satellite lay there on the ground scorched and partially split appart it still pathetically continued to transmit, prompting one announcer to quip, "Please, someone go out there and shoot the poor thing!" Talk about salt in the wound!Probably now long forgotten except by just a few old-timers was another event. The launch of Sputnik 2, the size a small automobile, on November 3, 1957 had left no doubt in the public's mind that the U.S.S.R. was fully capable of launching nuclear weapons able to strike any spot on the Earth on 30 minutes notice. Apprehension over what would come next was wide spread. Amidst this air of growing public concern word somehow reached the media that the Russians were going to use the total lunar eclipse on the morning of November 7th, just days after Sputnik 2's launch, to demonstrate their ultimate superiority. It was widely believed that a Soviet rocket had been launched on or about November 4th carrying a large nuclear warhead that would impact the moon during totality - an event that would purposely be visible over the western United States as a way of instilling even more fear in the American people. I remember watching the Today Show, themajor morning TV news program out of NYC, having a live west coast feed all through the broadcast that was locked on the moon and the hosts breaking away to it every couple of minutes. Various experts were interviewed on camera as to what to expect would be seen. There had even been some warnings to the public not to look directly at the moon if there was a flash (dangerous even at 240,000 miles away?!) for fear of eye damage!

Of course, nothing did occur, but millions must have been on the edge of their chairs glued to TV screens that morning during the duration of the eclipse.

BrooksObs

Derek Vail

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Re: Member Title?
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2018, 07:01:50 AM »
Meet the 'Steller Quasi Object'

Roberto Betancourt

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Re: Member Title?
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2018, 10:28:03 AM »
Quote
Meet the 'Steller Quasi Object'


Is that like "Quasar.....by Motorolla"? - old TV ad for those not in the know....