General Astronomy > Beginners Forum

My current plan for a telescope purchase

(1/7) > >>

malralilin:
I, am retired, so have spent many hours contemplating a scope purchase. I can't say I am where I want to be yet but here is where I am and would like your comments.
xx12i build your own
Cases & shroud
ES 24 82 deg
ES 14 82 deg
ES 6.7 82 deg
Finder Scope Right angle with illuminated cross hairs
Now I know that if I went with a Barlow instead of individual lens I could perhaps eliminate the 14 and 6.7 mm but I prefer not to use a Barlow, just my preference.
Would love to get input as to this package and/or how you would modify it and why.
Thanks

Derrick Matlock:
That is a set of gear that I myself would be glad to have, but I wonder if you could say more about the context of your observing. The XX12i is a big, heavy telescope and I wonder what your observing setup will be and how the light pollution situation is. Have you had a telescope before? Do you have certain types of objects that you would most like to see?

Many people with light polluted skies at home like a smaller, more portable setup that allows them to travel to darker skies occasionally. The improvement gained from being able to travel to darker skies is far larger than any performance loss you would see from moving to a smaller scope.

The other concern with a large, heavy telescope is moving it into position for observing. With cameras, they say that the best one is the one you have with you. With telescopes, the corresponding saying is that the best telescope is the one that you will use.

With the hours that you have been contemplating your purchase, you could consider getting a pair of binoculars and a planisphere and going outside to learn the sky. I'm sure you'll get lots more input from others here, but the more information you can give about your particular situation, the more helpful their answers will be.

-Neil

breakinnocor:
Neil makes a lot of good points. Be careful not to underestimate the size and weight of a 12". Most people around here recommend an 8" Dob for beginners, and with a lot of good reasons. It's a highly versatile type of scope and not severely heavy or large.

Re: eyepieces, there's a lot of different ways to approach this. You want a good spread of exit pupils, FOV, and magnification - one to max out the FOV of your field stop, one to absolutely max out the magnification of your scope (0.5mm exit pupil), and one in the middle with a more moderate magnification and comfortable exit pupil that will perform well in mediocre seeing. Oftentimes, this is achievable with 2 EP's and a Barlow but it depends on the scope.

Leon Ware:
That's a fine scope. And the entire kit you list will work together very well.
I'd like to see you take better advantage of the 2" focuser though. I like ES82 30mm + ES82 18mm + Lunt HDC 9mm (or ES100 9mm) for a great ep set and relatively modest cost. There was an ES82 30mm on AstroMart last weekend for $200, a bargain. You can add higher mag later but magnification is less important than most may think for DSO observing with good aperture like you have there. Brightness and detail will help initially.
Great call on the shroud & cases. The Orion cases are nice.
You may want a Telrad. They're really effective. A nice chair like the Starbound is more helpful than you may know.
You WILL need collimation tools to get the benefit of your optics. Hotech and Farpoint are probably the best out there now. Collimation is critical and, with good tools and a little practice, really quick and easy. If the choice is between upgrading from your chosen ep kit and getting a good collimation tool, get the tool.
Astronomy & retirement are a fine match. Have fun!

_________
edit - A past pres. of our club downsized to an XX12g after an accident. Heavier than the XX12i, he handles it fine as it breaks down into reasonably sized components. It is a really effective aperture. Only you know your physical capabilities. The XX12i is not small but it is also configured to keep the masses reasonable.

John Abreu:

--- Quote ---Neil makes a lot of good points. Be careful not to underestimate the size and weight of a 12". Most people around here recommend an 8" Dob for beginners, and with a lot of good reasons. It's a highly versatile type of scope and not severely heavy or large.

Re: eyepieces, there's a lot of different ways to approach this. You want a good spread of exit pupils, FOV, and magnification - one to max out the FOV of your field stop, one to absolutely max out the magnification of your scope (0.5mm exit pupil), and one in the middle with a more moderate magnification and comfortable exit pupil that will perform well in mediocre seeing. Oftentimes, this is achievable with 2 EP's and a Barlow but it depends on the scope.


--- End quote ---
I agree with Treadmarks
I manage our club's equipment loan program and i'm caretaker of their Skywatcher collapsible 12" dob. Its a hefty beast. It puts up nice images though.

If you've never seen these scopes in person try to attend a public event for astronomy. Someone is bound to have a 12" dob that you can see. Think of it as a dog and pony show or a used car lot.

Also you might try arriving early to watch folks assemble their scopes. This will give you a good idea about what you are in for.

IF YOU CONSIDER A TELRAD MAKE SURE YOU MEASURE THE SECONDARY ASSEMBLY TO SEE IF A TELRAD WILL FIT. THE SKYWATCHER COLLAPSIBLE WHICH PROBABLY HAS THE SAME WIDTH ASSEMBLY WAS TOO NARROW TO ACCEPT A TELRAD.

Orion has the EZ Finder Deluxe. If the Telrad base is too long to go on this the EZ Finder is fine
http://www.telescope...ASABEgJg_fD_BwE

Agena also has a multi reticle finder that is a good value
http://agenaastro.co...style-base.html

I have the ES82 30mm and I love it, but the Orion 2" Deep View Eyepiece that comes with the scope will do you well for a while. The 10mm plossl you won't like. The eye lens is just too tiny to be comfortable observing in my opinion

Jon

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version