Author Topic: My introduction and first question  (Read 662 times)

Alex Hart

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Re: My introduction and first question
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2018, 01:14:51 AM »
I'd recommend a dobsonian. If you want to see more details on planets and deep sky objects, aperture is the most important thing. Dobs can also achieve wider fields of view that SCTs and Maks typically can't reach due to faster focal ratios. Dobs are also significantly cheaper per inch of aperture than refractors and cassegrain telescopes. A brand new 8 inch dobsonian will usually cost between $350-$400 while an 8 inch SCT would cost around 4x as much. The downside for dobs is their need for frequent alignment of the mirrors (way easier than it sounds). A dob is for someone who wants to see details on objects like planets and nebulae and doesn't worry too much about photography. They aren't called light buckets for nothing.
   
Just about any 8 inch dob on the market will work well as most are made by either GSO or Synta, you may be able to find them used for as low as 200 bucks. Welcome to Cloudy Nights and good luck with your decision!

grumepinod

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Re: My introduction and first question
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2018, 03:23:03 AM »
Quote
I'd recommend a dobsonian. If you want to see more details on planets and deep sky objects, aperture is the most important thing. Dobs can also achieve wider fields of view that SCTs and Maks typically can't reach due to faster focal ratios. Dobs are also significantly cheaper per inch of aperture than refractors and cassegrain telescopes. A brand new 8 inch dobsonian will usually cost between $350-$400 while an 8 inch SCT would cost around 4x as much. The downside for dobs is their need for frequent alignment of the mirrors (way easier than it sounds). A dob is for someone who wants to see details on objects like planets and nebulae and doesn't worry too much about photography. They aren't called light buckets for nothing.
   
Just about any 8 inch dob on the market will work well as most are made by either GSO or Synta, you may be able to find them used for as low as 200 bucks. Welcome to Cloudy Nights and good luck with your decision!

Dobs are wonderful at planetary imaging, if used right.

percufareg

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Re: My introduction and first question
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2018, 04:15:18 AM »
Realize one thing. Visual astronomy and astrophotography of deep space objects are two utterly different things, and require utterly different setups.

Your short exposure eyes need a big scope to gather light fast. They are relatively insensitive to other things, like tracking errors.

.005mm pixels can do magic. They can accumulate light for a long time. Then you can use a computer to separate that light from a sea of noise. The images people get are way more detailed than the things people can see visually.

But those .005mm pixels need to be pointed extremely precisely for a long time for that to work. Mounts that can do that are very expensive. Even those can't do it well enough, you need a separate scope and camera tracking a star, and sending corrections to the mount. "Autoguiding". A big scope makes life very hard.

There is no good compromise. Those pretty pictures are neither easy nor cheap.

Planetary/lunar imaging uses very short exposures, a visual setup works great.

Davione Boone

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Re: My introduction and first question
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2018, 07:55:55 PM »
I do not think an 8" SCT is a good first telescope for a beginner. I would recommend a refractor in the 80-100mm range, F/8 or greater. Here is an example of what I mean. It's only $150 so it would be hard to regret purchasing it. Refractors are very easy and fun to use, and the best objects in the night sky will look good in just about anything. Most people who stick with the hobby will upgrade their telescope at some point. So when the time comes to buy a big, advanced telescope you'll be able to make an informed purchase and your small, wide-field refractor will complement your big gun.

adlamontma

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Re: My introduction and first question
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2018, 01:41:53 PM »
https://www.kwtelesc...raditional.html

You'll need to learn and master the process of collimation, and for best image quality, particularly at the higher magnifications for planets and other objects. Many objects, including the planets, are at their most beautiful and engaging at the higher powers...

http://www.forumskyl...Collimation.pdf

You can get a webcam for astronomy, or one that's used for conference calls even, and take stills and video with the telescope. Now, the extra work in collimating a Newtonian will pay off in the end, especially with an 8" aperture, so don't be discouraged in that regard.

Buying used is a bit risky. You may end up with a dud, or a telescope that will require some work before being able to use it. A used telescope like a Maksutov or Schmidt can be quite the pickle in effecting repairs. The safest bets are used refractors and Newtonians, including Dobsonians which are actually Newtonians on a simple alt-azimuth mount.

On the other hand, a new telescope is just that, new, and with a warranty if something goes wrong.

Sean Lee

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Re: My introduction and first question
« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2018, 12:18:29 PM »
The Amazon link you give is peculiar. The first 2 just have to be the same, but 2 slightly different emails and different locations from where it ships.

The 2 supposidly different sellers have remarkably similar Seller Profiles, which also match that of the 3rd one Hailey Stewart. So I guess all 3 are the same.

Why would they want to contact Amazon to process your order?
Amazon might contact them to process the order, as in Dear Supplier get you finger out as we have a customer waiting, but they do not contact Amazon.
Also what contact? I guess the idea is you pay them, they ship from Ar, Mi, Az - take your choice as they seem to ship from all 3. Where is Amazon in all this?

In simple terms the whole thing stinks. I would not touch it. Actually puzzled that Amazon allow the bit requesting that a buyer contact them direct and not so avoid Amazon. I guess the idea is they make out that Amazon are doing the shipping to you, if so then why the "ships from Ar, Mi, Az". That way you ask Amazon where it is and they say Amazon have fouled up and wash their hands of it.

Get yourself an inexpensive scope, a big first scope is often more trouble then they are worth. As a first option try the ES Firstlight scopes the 80/640 refractor will be a fair starter option at $150. Find out then if this a hobby for you and then decide which direction you want to go in.

Noty Tarabori

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Re: My introduction and first question
« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2018, 09:51:29 AM »
This is a common scam. Run!