Author Topic: Newbie looking for binocs under $150 *w/ quality control*? Am I just dreaming?  (Read 58 times)

aceslaise

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Hi,
I'm searching for a few binocs to get into astronomy, with a funding of about 150.  So from what I understand, I'm searching for 8x50s or 10x50s realistically.  I was originally taking a look at the Celestron Skymaster 15x70 (bigger than I planned, but they include a tripod!) .  From what I read, there is terrible QC though.
Can anybody recommend a pair of binocs under 150 that would rather be good from the box?  Or is that a non-possibility?



suctoleshe

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<p>Welcome to Cloudy Nights!
</p>
At the price point you are able to get a very good pair of binoculars.  I enjoy these

https://www.amazon.c...0x50 binoculars

Alex Manuel

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I'd go over to the binocular department, and you will get many opinions. Good idea NOT getting the 15x70's. Lots of folks will recommend the Nikon Action Extreme series; I recently came into a pair of the 7x35's, and they are quite nice with a very wide field of view. The Action Extremes are often mentioned in the same sentence with the Pentax WPII series. Take your pick; apparently each has it's merits and deficiencies. The AE 10x50's are about 150.00. Don't get too wrapped up in the negatives; either of these series will give good service. BTW, welcome .

stalafovkith

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Pentax also makes a good pair of 10x50s... https://www.amazon.c...0x50 binoculars

I have an older pair, also 10x50, and had paid about the same price. They're great...
EDIT: My Pentax 10x50s and the night sky are in love with each other.


Clint Trotter

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Redfield 10x42. They use an aluminum frame and have a lifetime warranty.

https://www.bhphotov...1,1105202454760

Might even be able to find them for less.

Michael Postle

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A crucial advice from my part is: get something that you can test and return if need it, I have been buying binocularsduring the past 15 years and now I own two and have returned more than five of them, the problem seems to be that they are more designed for terrestrial observation that for star gazing and problems with collimation and astigmatism abound, they can even be from a good brand it really does't matter ( I returned twice the Nikon 10x50) they really need to be tested at the night sky

Mario Evans

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If you can find an extra $10, the Nikon Action Extreme 12x50 would be a great buy for $160; the extra magnification is definitely worth it. And yes, you need to conduct a comprehensive star test as soon as you receive them, so you can get an exchange if they're not up to scratch.

An alternative is to check Craigslist for local binoculars, which you can test before you buy.

Edward Johnston

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I have Celestron Skymaster 15x70 and they came woefully uncollimated. I learned to collimate them and they were ok. Hard to hold in the night sky so I attached them to a tripod and they were ok but still had collimation problems. It was recommended on one of these forums to try Celestron Skymaster 8x56mm or 9x63mm. They were 100 more than the 15x70. I took a chance and ordered the 8x56mm and totally love them. Came collimated and give great handheld views of the night sky. I only made a slight diopter adjustment. I know it's around 180 but I like them a lot better than the 15x70mm. I have a few Vortex Birding Binoculars (8x42 and 10x42) that I sometimes use at night but having an objective lens of 50mm plus makes a lot of difference.

Justin Lewis

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I use everyday standard birding/nature binoculars.
None are costly but the best set I have in terms of optical performance are the 8x42 Bushnell Natureview's (Roof prism), likely just about the budget given. I kinow they do a 10x42 but not sure they would really deliver any benefit. Simply nothing at 8x is going to leap out at you with 10x.

Bigger ones sound "better" but it means more weight and at higher magnifications objects bounce around. The result being a tripod is necessary.

neaubigvapec

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I think that it will be not good to observewith a binoculars, you should consider more for choice. Binoculars can see some objects but telescopes is the best choice. Everything will be in your eyes, but the bad point is quite hard to carry.
Regards !

ruesonecrai

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Quote

Some years ago I purchased a pair of Barska 15x70s at a local store, when I got home I discovered they were badly out of collimation and returned them. These are essentially the same binoculars as the Celestron Skymasters. In the binoculars forum, the collimation issues with these come up on a regular basis. This thread is about binos under $150 with good quality and good quality control..

At the $150 pricepoint, the Nikon Action Extremes represent good, solid binoculars, well made, waterproof, plenty of eye relief. I prefer 10x50s, they show more than 7x or 8x binos, still offer a 6.5 degree TFoV and can be hand held by many/most observers without to much difficulty

Jon

Jomega Ceo

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I have owned and still own a number of binos up to 25X100. My most used pair is a pair of 8X40's. Easy to hand hold steady at 8X, light, and with enough light grasp to be satisfying. I went to the sport optics section of a sporting goods store and tried them all out by taking them outside. I really liked the Zeiss 8X40 but at $2200 a bit rich for me. I paid $80 for a Chinese pair with actually very nice optics. I have the Celestron 15X70's and mine were collimated. My friend's pair were not. Definitely test them all before you buy, preferably on a night sky.

Derek Vail

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I would research the Pentax and Nikon 10x50s in that price range before choosing between the two.

bermordliro

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Don't forget to budget in a tripod or something to mount the binoculars on... makes a world of difference when the view is solid and not shaky.

teirazaro

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Don't forget to budget in a tripod or something to mount the binoculars on... makes a world of difference when the view is solid and not shaky.

Most people prefer to use small binoculars (up to about 10X) without a mount. A tripod certainly improves the view a great deal, but at the cost of losing the freedom of sweeping across the sky at will that is (for me) the greatest benefit of binoculars. And I find tripod-mounted binoculars profoundly uncomfortable for viewing anything that's more than 30 degrees above the horizon -- causes nasty neck strain.