Author Topic: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.  (Read 651 times)

sanddotshanpens

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Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2018, 11:09:26 PM »
At my cabin, I've frequently observed in single digit temps but I've recorded temps as cold as the mid -20F's but I've never be out there when these super low temps have occurred. I've largelygotten by with good layering with stuff I already have. Upper Body----> Long underwear, flannel shirt, wool sweater and ski jacket. Lower Body---->Long underwear, flannel lined jeans, ski pants. Feet---> Wool socks, fleece lined winter boots. All that's been comfortable for at least 2-3 hours sitting in the coldest that I've wanted to go out in. But I was in Fairbanks last January in a relatively mild winter weather period for them ( -16F) and I'd have to do something different if lived in a place that routinely cold. The difference between 5F and -15F is quite stark....

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Adam Cormier

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Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
« Reply #31 on: January 30, 2018, 12:05:52 AM »
Come on down to South Florida. All you need are shorts and t-shirt. We have 85F at Christmas time. Now if only we had a sky to look at.

Bill Godschalk

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Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2018, 04:14:24 AM »
No matter what your preference is regarding the type of clothing, dress as though it's 30 degrees colder outside than it actually is. And be sure to stand on something - so your feet are off the ground. Many people use a rug remnant, but I've found that a square of 2" thick insulation board works really well.

tialegofi

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Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
« Reply #33 on: January 31, 2018, 08:46:30 AM »
A couple of weeks before Black Friday, I picked up some insulated coveralls over at Tractor Supply. Brand name Schmidt I believe. $50.00 or so. Very warm. A little stiff, need to be broken in. Warm, lots of pockets. Metal zippers down full length of pant leg. Got to use them earlier this month in 20F weather and I was warm. Butt was dry even with tons of dew on my astronomy seat. Knees are padded which was nice when kneeling over to guide my dob through the sky.

unamprodce

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Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
« Reply #34 on: February 02, 2018, 05:52:41 PM »
Just got a set of these this morning for Christmas: http://workingperson...-coveralls.html and they will definitely do the trick for sitting in the observatory or out at a dark site. When imaging I tend to spend a lot of time not moving, so I plan to dress like it's 20 or 30 degrees colder than it is. In extreme weather add the right underlayer (I like Duluth Power Dry Wool or Buck Naked base layers), fleece lined jeans and a thermal shirt, with Moon boots, silk and wool socks, gloves-as-appropriate, and a balaclava with neck cover and I'm good to go 

Clear Skies,
Brian

nontpremlapi

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Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2018, 10:24:42 AM »
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I NEVER wear cotton base layers I always use silk, polypro or polyester  here.
I don't wear cotton against my skin when backpacking, snowshoing or skiing. But I find cotton every bit as warm as polypro for sedentary activities such as stargazing, and considerably more comfortable. Getting sweaty is pretty much of a non-issue for cold-weather stargazing.<p class="citation">Quote
Wool is much better than polyester fleece, but is also significantly more expensive.
I'm surprised to hear you say that; the consensus in the outdoor community has definitely moved toward fleece in preference to wool. The claim is that it has better warm-when-wet properties.
Personally, I'm a little skeptical of that claim, but fleece definitely wears a lot better. I used to wear wool all the time, before fleece was invented. It worked fine. Now I wear fleece all the time. It works fine.
I don't even like cotton for anything outside of being lazy around the house.  Or summer wear where being wet can be a benefit.
No, the consensus around the outdoor community is still leaning heavily toward wool.  Go ask anyone at whiteblaze, hammockforums, survivalistboards, etc. What to wear during outdoors activities and they'll still lean heavily toward wool.  Modern wools wear nothing like your 1980s woolies, in fact many modern wool layers are now as comfy as any cotton.  Like I said, my icebreakers socks are the best investment I've ever made.  Nothing against polyester fleece, but after some time fleece can start smelling pretty bad, wool is also naturally antimicrobial.  Go to a hostel along the AT and see how easy it is to tell the polyester fleece vs. Wool wearers when they walk in the door.  It's the cost factor that leans the more casual outdoorsman toward fleece.  I would consider most people here to be casual in the fact that chances are they'll never be more than a short walk from a vehicles or building, in those cases fleece is a cost factor.
I have both fleece and wool, in most cases warmth to weight is won out by wool every day of the week and twice on Sundays.  Fleece socks are absolutely Terrible compared to wool.  Good wool wears and feels similar to cotton, good fleece still pills and collects dirt and grime.  My oldest Sherpa lined jacket looks terrible on the inside!  But I still love it!  And every small shard of twig, woodchip, leaf litter, etc tangled in that pilled mess lol.  If you see me at a VBAS meeting in Huntsville and I'm wearing my reeltree hoodie jacket with a Sherpa lining ask to see the inside lol.  About every 2 to 3 years I have to replace my fleece.  I have wool layers that are more than 10 years old and look nearly new.  That's another thing to consider as well as wool being non flammable and polyester fleece just looking for an excuse to melt against your skin.
My preferences are based off high energy outdoors activities and layer convenience.  If you are walking 50' from your car by all means get you a flap bottom cotton unionsuit (I have one, it's awesome, women should have one so they can potty without having to undress) and some coveralls.  First time you have to potty NOW and can't get them peeled off in time come talk to me.
Oh yeah, hey ladies!  My wifey says you need a gogirl and some game winner insulated hunting bibs (they have a front to back zip out bottom for ease of relieving yourself without undressing.).  Ill be honest, I've seriously considered some of the women's version bibs.  She's a smart gal!http://www.icebreake...cB&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds
You'd thank me.  They cover every layer!  But no, you don't have to spend merino wool and Carhart prices to stay warm.  Go to wallyworld and get some champion base layers, some Rocky mid layers and decent fleece shirt and some fleece sleep pants some Walls bibs and a good jacket and you'll be in business for less than a single set of carhart coveralls.  Around here at my house right now I'm overheated in a T-shirt and everything is WET!

lolusthoumin

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Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
« Reply #36 on: February 09, 2018, 10:43:29 AM »
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Hey guys, I recently got into astronomy and the one thing that kept cutting my sessions short was the extreme cold we’ve been facing lately. Well, extreme for a California boy who lives in a desert.

Last week it hovered around 20 degrees all night with some wind and in that kind of weather it’s tough to get anything done. But I’ve found a solution. My folks used to work back on the farm in Minnesota so one of the first things they would do before going outside was to throw on a pair of insulated coveralls.

Be the envy of your astronomy friends by looking exactly like Dr. Venture, and as an added benefit it’s hard to use the restroom!
Seriously though. Duluth Trading Company and Dickies both make these. You can get them with arms or without. Links coming down. Here and Here.
Of course they don't have to be Dickies or Duluths but they are well known clothing companies that don't skimp on making quality outerwear.
I know you guys back east have been seeing unseasonably warm temperatures, but believe me it'll get cold for you too, and you'll be happier with a pair on when it does get cold. You can literally throw these things on in seconds and I've found them to be extremely nice and warm.
Another thing I've found, that is immensely better than cutting a fingertip off your gloves are these, here.
These allow you to use your smartphones, which are becoming an increasingly necessary item with go-to scopes with amateurs, as well as being a handy reference for people with more expertise. Or a means of controlling your entire telescope as with the Celestron Evo's.
By the way, if you're operating a cellphone at a black sight, you'll blow up your eyes looking at the screen, but many apps now transform your cellphone into a nightime red light. Here is one.

Use this thread to discuss the nice and the necessary things you have to do in order to be observing in these winter months. Remember never to operate below your telescope, or your electronics', temperature limit.
I wouldn't be afraid to wear one to a star party. ****, let them freeze! I've got scienceing to do!
Hey! Just move to Long Island, NY! Record- breaking temps! T-shirt weather, and it's Christmas time! Love it! Can't view the Heavens for the clouds and fog, but NO SNOW!!!!