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General Astronomy => Beginners Forum => Topic started by: caenalfosen on December 24, 2017, 08:15:46 AM

Title: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: caenalfosen on December 24, 2017, 08:15:46 AM
Hey guys, I recently got into astronomy and the one thing which kept cutting my sessions short was that the extreme cold we've been facing lately.  Well, intense for a California boy who lives in a desert.

Last week it hovered around 20 degrees all night with a few wind and in that type of weather it is hard to get anything finished.  However, I've discovered a solution.  My folks used to work back to the farm in Minnesota so among the first things they would do before going outside was to throw a pair of insulated coveralls.

Be the envy of your astronomy friends by appearing just like Dr. Venture, and as an additional benefit it is difficult to use the toilet!
Seriously though.  Duluth Trading Company and Dickies equally create these.  You can get them  without.  Links coming down.   Here (http://www.amazon.com/Dickies-Mens-Premium-Insulated-Coverall/dp/B000VWAHGY) and Here (http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/product/mens-alaskan-hardgear-kenai-snow-bibs-26737.aspx?processor=content).
Obviously they don't need to be Dickies or even Duluths however they're well known clothing companies which don't skimp on producing quality outerwear.
I understand you guys back east are seeing unseasonably warm temperatures, but believe me it'll get chilly for you too, and you'll be more happy using a pair on if it will get chilly.  You can literally throw those things on in seconds and I have found these to be exceptionally nice and hot.
Another thing I have discovered, that's enormously better than cutting a fingertip off your gloves are these, here.   (http://www.laptopmag.com/articles/best-touchscreen-gloves)
These allow you to utilize your smartphones, which have become an increasingly necessary item with detachable scopes with amateurs, in addition to being a useful reference for individuals with additional experience.  Or a means of controlling your complete telescope as with all the Celestron Evo's.
Incidentally, if you are working a phone at a black sight, you are going to blow up your eyes looking at the display, but many apps today transform your phone into a nightime red light.   Here (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.urbandroid.lux&hl=en) is one.

Use this thread to talk about the nice and the necessary things you need to do to be able to be observing in those winter months.  Remember never to operate below your telescope, or your electronics', temperature limit.
I would not be afraid to wear you into a celebrity party.   ****, make them freeze!   I have obtained <strong>scienceing</strong> to do!
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Chris Castillo on December 28, 2017, 10:32:41 PM
Holy moly, I've had a pair of those Dickies insulated overalls for years for working on cars out in the elements, but for some reason never thought to put them to use during astronomy sessions.

Bonus points, you can put some long underwear underneath them, and sweat while you're out there!

Seriously, those overalls keep you nice and warm, and have a bit of padding to them, too. Plus lots of pockets.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: wallnewsspheryz on December 31, 2017, 02:04:19 AM
Great idea; I've been freezing here in San Diego, lol. Seriously....
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: neulosali on December 31, 2017, 09:12:11 AM
I like the chemical hand warmers for hands, feet and hats.
http://www.amazon.co...0HHR1KMAGBNBMGV (http://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers/dp/B00PX20LO0/ref=pd_sim_468_1?ie=UTF8&amp;dpID=51%2Bk8z12gRL&amp;dpSrc=sims&amp;preST=_AC_UL160_SR160%2C160_&amp;refRID=0EVQH0HHR1KMAGBNBMGV)

and my daughter got me a pair of these mittens that help a lot (although, I'm not sure of the brand)...
http://www.amazon.co...GCHZCYW9GSSZ56T (http://www.amazon.com/Hot-Headz-Polarex-Glomitts-Gloves/dp/B00N55YWJC/ref=pd_sim_193_2?ie=UTF8&amp;dpID=41lm5QOmPeL&amp;dpSrc=sims&amp;preST=_AC_UL200_SR160%2C200_&amp;refRID=0Q9SMGCHZCYW9GSSZ56T)
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Eric Castro on December 31, 2017, 03:31:03 PM
I agree, but I prefer the Carhart brand. What I like about Carharts is that one is a lifetime supply. They just don't wear out, EVER!. If you aren't into coveralls though, try the Filson brand of clothing. Their motto is, or at least used to be, "If they were any tougher, they'd rust." Both Filson and Carhart are a bit pricey, but they are both a lifetime investment.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: malralilin on December 31, 2017, 10:18:14 PM
I have a set of Carhart coveralls, too. My only problem with them is the insulation isn't quite enough by itself. Carhart clothing is made for working in, not sitting. They are almost bullet proof, though.

I use ski glove liners to keep my hands thawed. Surprisingly warm for how thin they are and they let me keep most of my dexterity.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Saul Zhang on January 04, 2018, 02:20:26 AM
Quote
I agree, but I prefer the Carhart brand. What I like about Carharts is that one is a lifetime supply. They just don't wear out, EVER!. If you aren't into coveralls though, try the Filson brand of clothing. Their motto is, or at least used to be, "If they were any tougher, they'd rust." Both Filson and Carhart are a bit pricey, but they are both a lifetime investment.


Was actually just looking at the Carhart winter stuff. Bit pricey, but that's what was initially suggested to me I had just forgotten. You'll be paying 120 or less, but it will keep you comfy albeit less stylish than a coat and pants.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Richard Ross on January 05, 2018, 03:19:16 PM
Duluth Trading sells some if the best work clothes ever made.
Significantly higher grade then Dickies, and worth every penny.

If you already have some outdoor working winter wear, then absolutely use it.
But as mentioned, this stuff is for moving in outdoors in winter.
Standing or sitting at a scope may likely require more layering.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Michael Washington on January 09, 2018, 03:18:34 AM
I've been using insulated coveralls for decades and have been singing their praises for just as long.

But check this out:https://www.milwauke...com/heated-gear (https://www.milwaukeetool.com/heated-gear) First saw them in a Youtube ad a few days ago and was INSTANTLY hooked! I need this!

Also, don't forget your feet! I can warmly (pun intended) recommend these:http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/B00CME1UVK (http://www.amazon.com/Wellco-Extreme-Cold-Weather-Boots/dp/B00CME1UVK)Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Trendsetters Branch on January 09, 2018, 02:06:43 PM
Sadly they do not come in a size that will fit a freak like me.  Other than that a great idea!
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: James Bagby on January 10, 2018, 02:07:05 AM
Quote
Sadly they do not come in a size that will fit a freak like me.  Other than that a great idea!

What do you mean? The coveralls? I've seen them in HUGE sizes and they also sell them for kids. There should be one to fit anyone.Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: napephona on January 10, 2018, 05:35:57 AM
Which coveralls are warmest?
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Jomega Ceo on January 10, 2018, 09:29:05 AM
O.K.! Lets stop fooling around. I know about cold. I lived in the bush of Alaska for 13 years and in Siberia for 7. We seem to start off discussions with a general theme of "cold", but that "cold" is never defined. I've been out in cold, REAL COLD, -60 F cold. None of us are going to observe in those conditions, so lets get reasonable. Let's put a limit on the cold, say 0 to -10 F. If it's any colder than that you get what you deserve. In the 0 to -10 range wear some itchy scratchy wool one piece long Johns, silk socks under thick real wool socks and bunny boots. If you don't know what bunny boots are, look them up. You can find them at Army Navy Surplus stores. There are the felt kind, the originals called Micky Mouse boots and sometimes called bunny boots, and the rubber kind with the air valve on them to equalize pressure in them when flying. The rubber kind are more practical because when you come indoors you must remove the felt kind BEFORE you go inside or the snow on them will melt on them, soak into the felt and until you completely dry them out they are useless outdoors. The same is true of your parka, so leave it outside too and shake ALL of the snow off of you before going indoors. That's why the military went to the rubber ones that are air insulated, two layers of rubber with air in between. Remember the air valve and equalization and such? Now for your body, It is layers. Layers of real wool are best. several thin layers are better than a couple of thick layers. Last and most important is your head. 70% of your body heat that is lost is lost through your head. I prefer a parka (not a coat, a parka) with a hood and a wool watch cap under the hood. Remember the Alaska axioms, if your feet get cold, put on your hat. One other thing never NEVER get warm when you are out in very cold weather. Stay cool, not warm. When you are warm you perspire and that puts water into your insulation and then you have NO insulation,
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Bobby Javier on January 10, 2018, 11:11:40 AM
Quote
O.K.! Lets stop fooling around. I know about cold. I lived in the bush of Alaska for 13 years and in Siberia for 7. We seem to start off discussions with a general theme of "cold", but that "cold" is never defined. I've been out in cold, REAL COLD, -60 F cold. None of us are going to observe in those conditions, so lets get reasonable. Let's put a limit on the cold, say 0 to -10 F. If it's any colder than that you get what you deserve. In the 0 to -10 range wear some itchy scratchy wool one piece long Johns, silk socks under thick real wool socks and bunny boots. If you don't know what bunny boots are, look them up. You can find them at Army Navy Surplus stores. There are the felt kind, the originals called Micky Mouse boots and sometimes called bunny boots, and the rubber kind with the air valve on them to equalize pressure in them when flying. The rubber kind are more practical because when you come indoors you must remove the felt kind BEFORE you go inside or the snow on them will melt on them, soak into the felt and until you completely dry them out they are useless outdoors. The same is true of your parka, so leave it outside too and shake ALL of the snow off of you before going indoors. That's why the military went to the rubber ones that are air insulated, two layers of rubber with air in between. Remember the air valve and equalization and such? Now for your body, It is layers. Layers of real wool are best. several thin layers are better than a couple of thick layers. Last and most important is your head. 70% of your body heat that is lost is lost through your head. I prefer a parka (not a coat, a parka) with a hood and a wool watch cap under the hood. Remember the Alaska axioms, if your feet get cold, put on your hat. One other thing never NEVER get warm when you are out in very cold weather. Stay cool, not warm. When you are warm you perspire and that puts water into your insulation and then you have NO insulation,

As a long time Bowhunter. I can say that this is a must. Another important fact, Never wear cotton as your first layer, It absorbs &amp; holds moister next to your skin.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: David Reynolds on January 10, 2018, 11:31:40 PM
Quote
Quote

Sadly they do not come in a size that will fit a freak like me.  Other than that a great idea!

What do you mean? The coveralls? I've seen them in HUGE sizes and they also sell them for kids. There should be one to fit anyone.Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

I checked the site. No luck. I am 1.98 meters tall and 172 kg. I used to play Rugby Union and have the thighs, arms, chest, and sadly now the now beer belly due to lack of exercise to keep it off to prove it. I have yet to find a jumper or coverall that will fit me comfortably. Heck I have trouble finding trousers that fit me comfortably even at the freakishly tall and fat shops.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: David Allen on January 11, 2018, 08:14:17 AM
Don't forget Wall's... been keeping me warm for 40 years...

http://www.amazon.co... zone coveralls (http://www.amazon.com/Walls-Zero-Zone-Insulated-Coverall-Regular/dp/B00V2VY1R4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1450745633&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=walls+zero+zone+coveralls)
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Jimmy Harbaugh on January 11, 2018, 03:36:17 PM
Quote
Quote

Quote

Sadly they do not come in a size that will fit a freak like me.  Other than that a great idea!

What do you mean? The coveralls? I've seen them in HUGE sizes and they also sell them for kids. There should be one to fit anyone.Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

I checked the site. No luck. I am 1.98 meters tall and 172 kg. I used to play Rugby Union and have the thighs, arms, chest, and sadly now the now beer belly due to lack of exercise to keep it off to prove it. I have yet to find a jumper or coverall that will fit me comfortably. Heck I have trouble finding trousers that fit me comfortably even at the freakishly tall and fat shops.

Played eight years in the US. 1.8m and now nearly 16 stone myself. Played loosie when I was fit.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Christopher Patel on January 12, 2018, 03:04:14 AM
Quote
Quote

Sadly they do not come in a size that will fit a freak like me.  Other than that a great idea!

What do you mean? The coveralls? I've seen them in HUGE sizes and they also sell them for kids. There should be one to fit anyone.Clear skies!^
Thomas, Denmark

I checked the site. No luck. I am 1.98 meters tall and 172 kg. I used to play Rugby Union and have the thighs, arms, chest, and sadly now the now beer belly due to lack of exercise to keep it off to prove it. I have yet to find a jumper or coverall that will fit me comfortably. Heck I have trouble finding trousers that fit me comfortably even at the freakishly tall and fat shops.[/quote]

Played eight years in the US. 1.8m and now nearly 16 stone myself. Played loosie when I was fit.[/quote]

They make big and tall sizes though the stock varies on internet sales sites. I have seen them up to 5xlt
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: seucamthepo on January 12, 2018, 05:48:19 AM
I use ski pants for my lower torso. Wht gets cold on me are my hands and feet. For my hands, I wear silk gloves and use HotsnapsZ which are reusable by boiling. I keep them in my hoodie front pocket. For my feet, I use 2 or 3 pairs of socks with fleeced lined boots. Since I do all of my observing from my driveway, frequent trips back into the warm house lenghtens the time I can spend outside. However, when the temp is below 32, I just do not go out.
jim
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: miswalltile on January 12, 2018, 10:11:13 AM
As an avid Northeast fisherman and outside field technician I have learned that proper layering is the most effective way for me to stay warm. I am a big fan of Under Armor cold gear as a base layer. The synthetic material really works as advertised. It cuts down on the bulk and you can add or eliminate outer layers as conditions change without over heating. It can be a little pricey but so few things perform as advertised that I think it is worth the expense.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Jairo Zilinskas on January 12, 2018, 12:44:02 PM
Quote
Which coveralls are warmest?

The down-filled ones used by high-altitude mountaineers, by far. But they'll set you back the better part of $1,000, which is totally unnecessary.

In practice, just about any insulated bibs or coveralls are fine for the kinds of temperatures found in the Lower 48. Personally, I vastly prefer bibs; they're easy-on, easy-off, less restrictive than coveralls, and do the all-important job of keeping your legs and abdomen warm equally well. Add long underwear and/or lined pants if you still feel any cold at all on your legs.

You still need a good down jacket over the coveralls anyway; it's easy to find clothes that will keep your torso, arms, and head warm. If your down jacket isn't warm enough, use two nested. The beauty of down is that it's compressible, and therefore doesn't restrict movement at all.

I also prefer lightweight bibs used by skiers and snowmobilers, with thin, flexible outer surfaces, to the heavy versions by Carhart or Dickies. The latter are great if you're a construction worker, but astronomers don't put the kind of wear on their clothing that manual laborers do.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Ralph Sonberg on January 13, 2018, 12:55:58 PM
I had to install security equipment in an industrial freezer years ago. The temp was around 20-30 below F. The first day we couldn't stand to work for more than 10 minutes without "warming" up outside in the balmy 10F sun. That night someone suggested Carhart Arctic gear and I found it locally. The next day I could work for over an hour in the freezer. I have had the for 6+years and they are like new.

And I am 6'3", they are actually long enough for someone at least a few inches taller.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Fred Lafever on January 16, 2018, 11:28:01 PM
A lot excellent advice has been posted here.
But, simply in the interest of science, it appears thatdisproportionate heat loss via the head is being debunked by more modern research. Recent studies are showing that heat loss isroughlyproportional to the area of exposed skin across the body. (WebMD (http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/features/do-we-really-lose-most-of-our-heat-through-our-heads), BBC (http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/features/do-we-really-lose-most-of-our-heat-through-our-heads)).
The BBC article is particularly interesting in its reporting about loss of core temperature. Bottom line....still do make sure your head is well covered!
The comment made about using a parka should also be noted because of the added protection they provide for the neck area...as well as additional protection for the head.
Me? I'm a cold weenie. I've tried almost everythingmentioned aboveexcept electric jackets and still have a problem.
Moving south might be my only hope.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Manoj Jensen on January 18, 2018, 02:10:38 AM
I dunno if Dick's Sporting Goods still has them, but several years back I bought a pair of skier's winter bib overalls for $39.00. They tend to run smaller than the marked size, but they really have kept my legs and lower torso warm observing at +15F.

As an ex-smoker, I suffer from poor circulation, especially in my hands. My answer there is my 4-part 'system'. Silk skier's glove liners inside Nike runners' gloves first. If it's breezy, first a pair of nitrile mechanics' disposable gloves to block the wind; they hold sweat, so don't remove them until you're inside. Finally, a pair of too-large battery-warmed gauntlets that I keep by my chair. Leave them on medium heat when you start observing, and they'll feel toasty warm when you pull them on to warm your hands for a minute or two.

Jim H.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Eric Curry on January 18, 2018, 04:44:58 AM
Bibs and coveralls are never a bad idea, but staying truly warm starts against the skin. I've been an avid outdoorsman my entire life, spending long weekends sleeping in the snow backpacking, bushcrafting, rock climbing, fishing, etc. So by proxy I already have the gear I need to stay warm in some of the coldest weather.

First off, I don't buy the insulated versions as they are bulky and if you get overheated there is little you can do to remedy the situation, sweating is TONS worse than being a little chilled. This is my typical cold weather wear with dependencies. If I'm out and about town my outer wear will change from what it would be if I was working/bushcrafting, and that'll even be different from what I would wear backpacking.

Base layers - these are where it all starts, and it's important. I NEVER wear cotton base layers I always usesilk, polypro or polyester here. What weight base layer I wear is dependent on expected temperatures, but you can't go wrong having at minimum a couple sets of mid weight base layers. Even the cheaper Rocky brand at Wallyworld work amazingly well.

Mid layer - This is where I place my insulating layer typically consisting of wool or polyester fleece materials. Wool is much better than polyester fleece, but is also significantly more expensive. Well worth the money though, if you can afford wool then do yourself a favor, get it. I'm serious, even get the underwear if you can afford it. constantly dry jewels isa feeling I cherish to the point that every pair of cotton undies I owned got thrown in the trash over a decade ago, and I do NOT miss them lol. Please ensure to buy properly fitted clothes here because too tight and once you get enough layers on you will feel bound and restricted, too loose and they'll bunch up and create uncomfortable bulk.

Outerlayer - Once again, dependencies. If I'm running around town or hiking well groomed trails I'll wear down outer wear, yeah I know, it's insanely expensive, but NOTHING even comes close when it comes to light and comfortable warmth. You don't have to have the $150 North Face jacket either there are some department store brands and such that have one very nicely priced. First time you sit out by the telescope wearing some nice silky base layers with only a nice quality down jacket on you'll realize that you are cozy warm and almost feel naked to the point you feel you are cheating. If I'm working or bushcrafting or going to be around rugged terrain I of course have no issue grabbing my work wear, mostly Carhardt and Walls with some Dickies thrown in too.
* I wear a bib overall/jacket setup rather than a coverall setup so in case I get too warm I can remove my jacket.
* If not wearing down, my jacket is a Dickies work wear jacket with a Sherpa lining. I don't care for the other forms of lining, the Sherpa lining is where it's at.

FEET - Let's face it, not much ruins a night or day outside than getting cold feet. The answer is simple and has already been stated here. A nice silk liner (polyester liner socks are cheap and work fine as well.) and some good woolies. I like my smartwool socks but my gander mountain brand socks are exactly the same. But my Icebreakers socks are the best purchase I've ever made in socks.

Head - Simple, a nice fleece/wool/down beanie and you are set.

Gloves - I'm not even touching this because I've never really met two people who like the same things. I use like 5 different types of gloves depending on what I'm doing. You'll just have to find what you like. I'll offer this, I prefer to stay as thin as possibly to retain manual dexterity and I keep a hand warmer strapped around my waist.

Face - Like with gloves this is a huge matter of preference. I don't care to have much on my face, to knock off a little chill I might wear a buff, if it's really cold I'll cycle a fleece baklava over my nose off and on to warm up a little. But what goes on your face will have to be a matter of what you are comfortable with. Some people despise anything on their face. I don't blame them lol.
Here is an example outfit for what I might wear out for an astrology all nighter in sub freezing temperatures.

Layer 1 = some form of silkweight base layer, preferably silk, wool or polypro (coldpruf brand are nice and inexpensive)
Layer 2 = a midweight base layer, this one is typically polypro or thinner polyester fleece (I just get the mid weight Rocky brand from Wally World)
Layer 3 = This depends greatly on just how cold I expect it to get, this could range from a simple T-shirt to a heavier fleece shirt on my core, I rarely wear the extra layer on my legs. What you wear here will be regulated by your personal comfort level and cold tolerance. Carry a few extras in your car and experiment until you find a comfort level.
Outer layer = Since Astronomy will normally not require any bushwhacking I'm going to wear some Snow Bibs on my legs (these will be insulated, but still more comfortable than the thick workwear fabrics) Arctix makes solid quality affordable snow bibs (I've found some really nice ones at thrift stores for $1 before). As to the jacket, DOWN!!! Most certainly DOWN = Macy's has an affordable yet still quality down jacket, but shop around.
Head = I wear a simple polypro beanie made by SPYDER and one by Under Armor, I've yet to find a time when I need more.
Gloves = Once again there are dependencies here, I typically wear liner gloves and ahand muffaround my waist with a hot handz in it to quickly warm my hands up.
Feet = I can't really advise here, I have everything from high end hiking boots to crocs. For extreme cold I find I actually like my Guide Gear rubber boots with a liner sock covered by a calf height wool sock. If it's too cold for those (I'm not sure I'd want to be out in that level of cold) I can wear my insulated hunting boots with a silk liner and calf height wool socks. My next boot purchase isgoing to be replacing my rubber bootsand insulated hunting boots with (surprise) insulated rubber hunting boots.

The reason for all this seemingly complicated style of dress is the theory that activity levels can and often do change from time to time and being chilled is better than getting sweaty because once you get sweaty enough once the cold creeps in you are done. Stay dry and your body temperature will be MUCH more easily regulated. Live, learn, love and experiment with what works for you. For me, layering passes the common sense test. I can't stand single bulky layers because they make venting a pain in the butt and are just generally uncomfortable.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: guisamcipen on January 18, 2018, 08:58:07 AM
I'd like tomention that I've tried several brands of hunting socks in the pastwith so-so results. Not long ago I ordered some Rohner Socks andhit a much higher level of warmth and comfort. $$$, but worth it to me.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: rarisata on January 21, 2018, 02:43:46 AM
Love my Insulated coveralls when I'm out at night.As stated above all that is worthless if your feet are cold. I wear boots and if needed a small heatpack in each sock.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Ryan Wilton on January 21, 2018, 04:53:41 AM
Quote
Quote

Sadly they do not come in a size that will fit a freak like me.  Other than that a great idea!

What do you mean? The coveralls? I've seen them in HUGE sizes and they also sell them for kids. There should be one to fit anyone.Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

I checked the site. No luck. I am 1.98 meters tall and 172 kg. I used to play Rugby Union and have the thighs, arms, chest, and sadly now the now beer belly due to lack of exercise to keep it off to prove it. I have yet to find a jumper or coverall that will fit me comfortably. Heck I have trouble finding trousers that fit me comfortably even at the freakishly tall and fat shops.[/quote]

Played eight years in the US. 1.8m and now nearly 16 stone myself. Played loosie when I was fit.[/quote]

Cheers. Was Number 5 and 127kg when I played. Loved every minute of it until I very badly broke my tibia and fibula. Now I look back and wish I joined the Chess Club instead!

Personally I am a big fan of the wool German or Russian great coats for super cold weather with layers underneath. Less money than a North Face parka in my size for sure. But I just layer if I am out in colder than 40*F weather for longer periods. And yes it can get down to the low 20's in Sunny California. I usually do a long under shirt, shirt, sweater, barn coat on the top and long underwear, jeans, sweat pants, and double socks on the bottom. Watch cap on the head and glove liners for the hands. That keeps me going down to about 26*F. If it's windy I may opt for a scarf for the nose.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: artufanchess on January 25, 2018, 03:24:50 PM
Quote
I NEVER wear cotton base layers I always usesilk, polypro or polyester here.
I don't wear cotton against my skin when backpacking, snowshoing or skiing. But I find cotton every bit as warm as polypro for sedentary activities such as stargazing, and considerably more comfortable. Getting sweaty is pretty much of a non-issue for cold-weather stargazing.

<p class="citation">Quote
Wool is much better than polyester fleece, but is also significantly more expensive.
[/quote]
I'm surprised to hear you say that; the consensus in the outdoor community has definitely moved toward fleece in preference to wool. The claim is that it has better warm-when-wet properties.
Personally, I'm a little skeptical of that claim, but fleece definitely wears a lot better. I used to wear wool all the time, before fleece was invented. It worked fine. Now I wear fleece all the time. It works fine.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: bunkreplterpka on January 25, 2018, 03:50:13 PM
Used to be layered in wool from head to toe.
Did everything outdoors in it.
Still have some, hanging or folded in a corner or two.

Very much prefer modern fleece over wool these days too. For me.
Warm for it's weight, super easy to keep clean, cheap at secondhand stores.

You can't walk into the first one you go to, and find exactly what you need.
Particularly now, in winter.
Sometimes hit a few after Xmas, when folks are retiring old fleece coat/jackets.
You can find some very good condition name brand stuff, in successive sizes for building your layers.
For a fraction of retail price, and know it fits, layered and all, before you leave the store.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: sanddotshanpens on January 25, 2018, 11:09:26 PM
At my cabin, I've frequently observed in single digit temps but I've recorded temps as cold as the mid -20F's but I've never be out there when these super low temps have occurred. I've largelygotten by with good layering with stuff I already have. Upper Body----&gt; Long underwear, flannel shirt, wool sweater and ski jacket. Lower Body----&gt;Long underwear, flannel lined jeans, ski pants. Feet---&gt; Wool socks, fleece lined winter boots. All that's been comfortable for at least 2-3 hours sitting in the coldest that I've wanted to go out in. But I was in Fairbanks last January in a relatively mild winter weather period for them ( -16F) and I'd have to do something different if lived in a place that routinely cold. The difference between 5F and -15F is quite stark....

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Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Adam Cormier on January 30, 2018, 12:05:52 AM
Come on down to South Florida. All you need are shorts and t-shirt. We have 85F at Christmas time. Now if only we had a sky to look at.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: Bill Godschalk on January 31, 2018, 04:14:24 AM
No matter what your preference is regarding the type of clothing, dress as though it's 30 degrees colder outside than it actually is. And be sure to stand on something - so your feet are off the ground. Many people use a rug remnant, but I've found that a square of 2" thick insulation board works really well.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: tialegofi on January 31, 2018, 08:46:30 AM
A couple of weeks before Black Friday, I picked up some insulated coveralls over at Tractor Supply. Brand name Schmidt I believe. $50.00 or so. Very warm. A little stiff, need to be broken in. Warm, lots of pockets. Metal zippers down full length of pant leg. Got to use them earlier this month in 20F weather and I was warm. Butt was dry even with tons of dew on my astronomy seat. Knees are padded which was nice when kneeling over to guide my dob through the sky.
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: unamprodce on February 02, 2018, 05:52:41 PM
Just got a set of these this morning for Christmas: http://workingperson...-coveralls.html (http://workingperson.com/carhartt-mens-x06-blk-black-arctic-extremes-coveralls.html) and they will definitely do the trick for sitting in the observatory or out at a dark site. When imaging I tend to spend a lot of time not moving, so I plan to dress like it's 20 or 30 degrees colder than it is. In extreme weather add the right underlayer (I like Duluth Power Dry Wool or Buck Naked base layers), fleece lined jeans and a thermal shirt, with Moon boots, silk and wool socks, gloves-as-appropriate, and a balaclava with neck cover and I'm good to go 

Clear Skies,
Brian
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: nontpremlapi on February 09, 2018, 10:24:42 AM
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I NEVER wear cotton base layers I always use silk, polypro or polyester  here.
I don't wear cotton against my skin when backpacking, snowshoing or skiing. But I find cotton every bit as warm as polypro for sedentary activities such as stargazing, and considerably more comfortable. Getting sweaty is pretty much of a non-issue for cold-weather stargazing.<p class="citation">Quote
Wool is much better than polyester fleece, but is also significantly more expensive.
I'm surprised to hear you say that; the consensus in the outdoor community has definitely moved toward fleece in preference to wool. The claim is that it has better warm-when-wet properties.
Personally, I'm a little skeptical of that claim, but fleece definitely wears a lot better. I used to wear wool all the time, before fleece was invented. It worked fine. Now I wear fleece all the time. It works fine.
I don't even like cotton for anything outside of being lazy around the house.  Or summer wear where being wet can be a benefit.
No, the consensus around the outdoor community is still leaning heavily toward wool.  Go ask anyone at whiteblaze, hammockforums, survivalistboards, etc. What to wear during outdoors activities and they'll still lean heavily toward wool.  Modern wools wear nothing like your 1980s woolies, in fact many modern wool layers are now as comfy as any cotton.  Like I said, my icebreakers socks are the best investment I've ever made.  Nothing against polyester fleece, but after some time fleece can start smelling pretty bad, wool is also naturally antimicrobial.  Go to a hostel along the AT and see how easy it is to tell the polyester fleece vs. Wool wearers when they walk in the door.  It's the cost factor that leans the more casual outdoorsman toward fleece.  I would consider most people here to be casual in the fact that chances are they'll never be more than a short walk from a vehicles or building, in those cases fleece is a cost factor.
I have both fleece and wool, in most cases warmth to weight is won out by wool every day of the week and twice on Sundays.  Fleece socks are absolutely Terrible compared to wool.  Good wool wears and feels similar to cotton, good fleece still pills and collects dirt and grime.  My oldest Sherpa lined jacket looks terrible on the inside!  But I still love it!  And every small shard of twig, woodchip, leaf litter, etc tangled in that pilled mess lol.  If you see me at a VBAS meeting in Huntsville and I'm wearing my reeltree hoodie jacket with a Sherpa lining ask to see the inside lol.  About every 2 to 3 years I have to replace my fleece.  I have wool layers that are more than 10 years old and look nearly new.  That's another thing to consider as well as wool being non flammable and polyester fleece just looking for an excuse to melt against your skin.
My preferences are based off high energy outdoors activities and layer convenience.  If you are walking 50' from your car by all means get you a flap bottom cotton unionsuit (I have one, it's awesome, women should have one so they can potty without having to undress) and some coveralls.  First time you have to potty NOW and can't get them peeled off in time come talk to me.
Oh yeah, hey ladies!  My wifey says you need a gogirl and some game winner insulated hunting bibs (they have a front to back zip out bottom for ease of relieving yourself without undressing.).  Ill be honest, I've seriously considered some of the women's version bibs.  She's a smart gal!http://www.icebreake...cB&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds (http://www.icebreaker.com/en/home?gclid=CjwKEAiAkvmzBRDQpozmt-uluCQSJACvCd1lBb6IuopEBZawzLJg0-b5MPWr-IMudAfMuwM2fTB9QxoCyE3w_wcB&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds)
You'd thank me.  They cover every layer!  But no, you don't have to spend merino wool and Carhart prices to stay warm.  Go to wallyworld and get some champion base layers, some Rocky mid layers and decent fleece shirt and some fleece sleep pants some Walls bibs and a good jacket and you'll be in business for less than a single set of carhart coveralls.  Around here at my house right now I'm overheated in a T-shirt and everything is WET!
Title: Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
Post by: lolusthoumin on February 09, 2018, 10:43:29 AM
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Hey guys, I recently got into astronomy and the one thing that kept cutting my sessions short was the extreme cold we’ve been facing lately. Well, extreme for a California boy who lives in a desert.

Last week it hovered around 20 degrees all night with some wind and in that kind of weather it’s tough to get anything done. But I’ve found a solution. My folks used to work back on the farm in Minnesota so one of the first things they would do before going outside was to throw on a pair of insulated coveralls.

Be the envy of your astronomy friends by looking exactly like Dr. Venture, and as an added benefit it’s hard to use the restroom!
Seriously though. Duluth Trading Company and Dickies both make these. You can get them with arms or without. Links coming down. Here (http://www.amazon.com/Dickies-Mens-Premium-Insulated-Coverall/dp/B000VWAHGY) and Here (http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/product/mens-alaskan-hardgear-kenai-snow-bibs-26737.aspx?processor=content).
Of course they don't have to be Dickies or Duluths but they are well known clothing companies that don't skimp on making quality outerwear.
I know you guys back east have been seeing unseasonably warm temperatures, but believe me it'll get cold for you too, and you'll be happier with a pair on when it does get cold. You can literally throw these things on in seconds and I've found them to be extremely nice and warm.
Another thing I've found, that is immensely better than cutting a fingertip off your gloves are these, here. (http://www.laptopmag.com/articles/best-touchscreen-gloves)
These allow you to use your smartphones, which are becoming an increasingly necessary item with go-to scopes with amateurs, as well as being a handy reference for people with more expertise. Or a means of controlling your entire telescope as with the Celestron Evo's.
By the way, if you're operating a cellphone at a black sight, you'll blow up your eyes looking at the screen, but many apps now transform your cellphone into a nightime red light. Here (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.urbandroid.lux&amp;hl=en) is one.

Use this thread to discuss the nice and the necessary things you have to do in order to be observing in these winter months. Remember never to operate below your telescope, or your electronics', temperature limit.
I wouldn't be afraid to wear one to a star party. ****, let them freeze! I've got scienceing to do!
Hey! Just move to Long Island, NY! Record- breaking temps! T-shirt weather, and it's Christmas time! Love it! Can't view the Heavens for the clouds and fog, but NO SNOW!!!!