Author Topic: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?  (Read 56 times)

Todd Kue

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2018, 12:58:57 AM »
Quote

I don't use a moon filter either. I guess, I am too lazy to put it on. But this is what happens to me when I don't use any filters for the bright objects: after looking through the eyepiece for about a minute or two, and when I move away from the scope, I see a dark spot in my vision. Is this normal? It's like looking at a bright flashlight straight on. A dark spot is there for about 30 seconds or so then it is disappear.
William

William:

It is normal.

<p class="citation">QuoteI've tried looking at the moon before without a filter, in several scopes, 120ED, C8, C5, its painful. It may work for some, but not for me.
Thanks for the feedback all. All of those filters are relatively inexpensive, I'll give some of them a try and see which works best.[/quote]

Was your eye dark adapted when you looked at the moon? Does it bother you when you look at the moon during the day through a telescope? This is why Ed just leaves some lights on, the moon is bright to the dark adapted eye but not to an eye adapted to brighter conditions. And since the dark adapted eye relies on the rods which have rather poor spacial resolution and and see in grey scale rather than color, avoiding dark adaptation can be real plus when observing the moon and planets.

Jon

veworltonuc

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2018, 04:05:06 AM »
Quote
<p class="citation">QuoteHowever, for the past several years what I have been doing to observe the moon is to turn on the backyard lights. I even do that for observing Jupiter and Venus. As a bonus, not being dark adapted allows the eyes to see color much better. The moon does have color, albeit very subtle.
Some observers are not bothered by the brightness of the moon and have no problem observing it with large scopes. I'm not one of those. Even the 127mm Mak can be way too bright and painful to me. To each his own, and I always advise to do whatever works for you. Enjoy your Mak, they're great little instruments.
Ed D


Ed:

I am confused here. First you say that now that you just turn that n some lights so your eyevis no longer dark adapted and then you say the moon is too bright to observe with in large scopes..

The moon is no brighter in my 25 inch than it is in my 4 inch, its just larger. The eye naturally adapts to the brightness.

Jon[/quote]

Jon, what I was typing made sense to me at 5:00am. Now, after a few cups of coffee and reading the post again, I edited it.

Ed D

isveheartle

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2018, 04:50:42 AM »
to be honest here i would just buy any cheapish decent moon filter even a $15 one will be fine, norm i would say always get a quailty item per my other suggestion i have made in other pots, but to be honest any moon filter does the job. It just needs to reduce the brightness or glare when the moon id full or near full.

the only here i would say not to get is there some 1.25" moon filters which are cheap that uses a plastic housing and threads, so dont get these ones as the threads will cross thread pretty fast, so any cheapish 15 to 20 will do that metal housing.
joe

Randy Wiggins

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2018, 10:38:18 AM »
Quote
Hi.

I hate to say this, $$$ wise, but that angry cat avatar above is on to something. I happened to have two cheap identical 25 'Plossl's that came with telescopes (Orion Sirius/Celestron), so I bought a Celestron binoviewer. With a large Maksutov (the 180 mm), best and most comfortable way to look at the Moon. You'd think 25 mm would be lowish magnification, but the combination of slightly longer focal length due to longer light path and two retinas processing images, I saw as much as with one 10 mm eyepiece. Now I have a single 19 mm Panoptic somewhere, all lonely...

--Christian

Hmmmm. I have the 180 Mak too.  I have an observing buddy who constantly shouts the praises of bino viewing luna and planets. But both my eyes are very different, so its hard for me, and I wear glasses otherwise. 
So my question is with the 180, what do you use, which size/type diagonal? And you use the celestron bino viewer and then some 25mm's?  Does the light cone get cut down with that?
Thanks
Bob

Bobby Cruz

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2018, 06:31:47 PM »
I have two moon filters.

Orion 25% transmission. I like this one best. Comfortable view AND I feel it brings up the contrast of the surface.

Generic unlabeled.  Not marked but I would guess it is about 40% transmission. Works fine but I like the Orion better.

I like both of them better than looking at the bright moon alone.  I do feel they improve contrast and I don't feel like my eye is being fried.

I use them in an 80 mm refractor and an 8" reflector.

Your smileage may vary.

Marvin Neboet

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2018, 02:57:18 AM »
It is also painful for me to look at the moon through the telescope without a filter. My star buddy also gets migraines after viewing the moon unfiltered. I now no longer have hurting eyes, and my star buddy no longer gets migtanes when viewing the moon. I have tried several brands of filters, and the best one that did not make the view mushy at all, and reduced the light to acceptable levels is the neutral density filter from Vernonscope. I purchased two of their highest light reduction neutral density filters and stack them without ANY reduction in clarity or sharpness - it actually enhances the features on the moon for me. I have tried colour filters, neutral density, and polarizing filters. Neutral density worked the best to keep sharpness of the image, and allowing subtle features to be seen. The only caveat with Vernonscope filters is that you need to also get an adapter ring because their threads are different than regular eyepiece threads, but the adapter can be purchased from them as well. The neutral density filters and Lunar Map HD for my tablet have increased the pleasure I get from viewing the moon exponentially.

Jairo Zilinskas

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2018, 06:37:59 AM »
Quote
Quote

Hi.

I hate to say this, $$$ wise, but that angry cat avatar above is on to something. I happened to have two cheap identical 25 'Plossl's that came with telescopes (Orion Sirius/Celestron), so I bought a Celestron binoviewer. With a large Maksutov (the 180 mm), best and most comfortable way to look at the Moon. You'd think 25 mm would be lowish magnification, but the combination of slightly longer focal length due to longer light path and two retinas processing images, I saw as much as with one 10 mm eyepiece. Now I have a single 19 mm Panoptic somewhere, all lonely...

--Christian

Hmmmm. I have the 180 Mak too.  I have an observing buddy who constantly shouts the praises of bino viewing luna and planets. But both my eyes are very different, so its hard for me, and I wear glasses otherwise. 
So my question is with the 180, what do you use, which size/type diagonal? And you use the celestron bino viewer and then some 25mm's?  Does the light cone get cut down with that?
Thanks
Bob

Bob,

The big Mak has an Astro-Tech aluminum case dielectric mirror diagonal, 1.25". The 25 mm eyepieces have about 50 decrees AFOV, and I did not notice any vignetting on the Moon, and Jupiter had plenty of details. Very bright too. I found out that with highest magnification 8 mm eyepieces on Jupiter at least, I can not merge the images--a little misalignment of the bino prisms I suppose. Maybe I could on the Moon, since there is more visual info for the brain... Anyway I plan to get another Panoptic 19 and use that for highest magnification, and maybe another ES68 15 mm if they work with my binoviewer.

Unfortunately I've only been able to use the binoviewer 3 times since I got it a couple weeks ago, cloudy most of the time. I'd say give it a try, unless you have a huge amount of astigmatism in your eyes, there should be enough diopter adjustment. There are plenty of microscope users who wear glasses...

--Christian

Cesar Lawhorn

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2018, 09:27:43 PM »
Quote
Quote

Quote

Hi.

I hate to say this, $$$ wise, but that angry cat avatar above is on to something. I happened to have two cheap identical 25 'Plossl's that came with telescopes (Orion Sirius/Celestron), so I bought a Celestron binoviewer. With a large Maksutov (the 180 mm), best and most comfortable way to look at the Moon. You'd think 25 mm would be lowish magnification, but the combination of slightly longer focal length due to longer light path and two retinas processing images, I saw as much as with one 10 mm eyepiece. Now I have a single 19 mm Panoptic somewhere, all lonely...

--Christian

Hmmmm. I have the 180 Mak too.  I have an observing buddy who constantly shouts the praises of bino viewing luna and planets. But both my eyes are very different, so its hard for me, and I wear glasses otherwise. 
So my question is with the 180, what do you use, which size/type diagonal? And you use the celestron bino viewer and then some 25mm's?  Does the light cone get cut down with that?
Thanks
Bob

Bob,

The big Mak has an Astro-Tech aluminum case dielectric mirror diagonal, 1.25". The 25 mm eyepieces have about 50 decrees AFOV, and I did not notice any vignetting on the Moon, and Jupiter had plenty of details. Very bright too. I found out that with highest magnification 8 mm eyepieces on Jupiter at least, I can not merge the images--a little misalignment of the bino prisms I suppose. Maybe I could on the Moon, since there is more visual info for the brain... Anyway I plan to get another Panoptic 19 and use that for highest magnification, and maybe another ES68 15 mm if they work with my binoviewer.

Unfortunately I've only been able to use the binoviewer 3 times since I got it a couple weeks ago, cloudy most of the time. I'd say give it a try, unless you have a huge amount of astigmatism in your eyes, there should be enough diopter adjustment. There are plenty of microscope users who wear glasses...

--Christian
Thanks Christian......btw, have you seen the thread on these Vite EPs?  Evidently the performance to price ratio is very good on a couple....take a look... http://www.cloudynig...e-23m-aspheric/ Could be perfect for narrow field and the bino viewer 'two fer' issue.
Bob

Michael Thompson

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #23 on: January 22, 2018, 10:44:52 PM »
Quote
It is also painful for me to look at the moon through the telescope without a filter. My star buddy also gets migraines after viewing the moon unfiltered. I now no longer have hurting eyes, and my star buddy no longer gets migtanes when viewing the moon. I have tried several brands of filters, and the best one that did not make the view mushy at all, and reduced the light to acceptable levels is the neutral density filter from Vernonscope. I purchased two of their highest light reduction neutral density filters and stack them without ANY reduction in clarity or sharpness - it actually enhances the features on the moon for me. I have tried colour filters, neutral density, and polarizing filters. Neutral density worked the best to keep sharpness of the image, and allowing subtle features to be seen. The only caveat with Vernonscope filters is that you need to also get an adapter ring because their threads are different than regular eyepiece threads, but the adapter can be purchased from them as well. The neutral density filters and Lunar Map HD for my tablet have increased the pleasure I get from viewing the moon exponentially.


I've found the Lumicon, Vernonscope, and Baader filters are all of excellent quality. The Baader filters sometimes have rough threads, but optically are excellent.

Dave

Nate Flores

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2018, 01:31:09 AM »
Quote
I don't use a moon filter either. I guess, I am too lazy to put it on. But this is what happens to me when I don't use any filters for the bright objects: after looking through the eyepiece for about a minute or two, and when I move away from the scope, I see a dark spot in my vision. Is this normal? It's like looking at a bright flashlight straight on. A dark spot is there for about 30 seconds or so then it is disappear.

William

Perfectly normal, William. The bright moon "exhausts" the photopigment in your retina, but only in the very center (your macula lutea), leaving that portion of your retina very light-adapted, while the surrounding retina is not as light-adapted. Thus you see a dark spot surrounded by less darkness when you look away from the EP. If your retinal chemistry is normal it should last no more than 20-30 seconds.

propdiagairil

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #25 on: January 23, 2018, 04:13:12 AM »
Quote
Thanks Christian......btw, have you seen the thread on these Vite EPs?  Evidently the performance to price ratio is very good on a couple....take a look... http://www.cloudynig...e-23m-aspheric/ Could be perfect for narrow field and the bino viewer 'two fer' issue.
Bob

Something to consider!

--Christian

Henry Edward

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2018, 10:38:51 AM »
With a 80 or larger scope no Moon filter means ruining my dark adaption for minutes.The one time I viewed the unfiltered Moon in my 6" achromat the dark spot was so bad I couldn't safely walk across Moonlit yard.

esrescioripp

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2018, 01:56:55 PM »
Yes, the angry cat avatar is indeed on to something.....

handvestlazo

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Re: Which moon filter for 127mm mak?
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2018, 02:39:23 PM »
My 2 cents would be using a filter that allows you to comfortably view the moon immediately as you look into the telescope and then afterward has no effect on your night vision. Personally I use Baader neutral density filter that transmits 12.5%. I use it for all phases of the moon with my TV-85. As a career pathologist who has spent up 10 hours a day viewing slides through a microscope it is really important not to view objects that seem too bright, let alone hurts your eyes. By looking at the moon in full brightness the "black spot" in vision that follows is an area in the retina that has been bleached of visual pigment. Basically it's been hit by so many photons of light the visual pigments in those areas have been fairly well depleted. It's a temporary condition as the visual system recovers but from a common sense standpoint of being able to see to safely navigate back across the yard and maybe what you can to preserve your vision as you age it may be safer to use something to decrease the brightness.  I've found that by using the ND filter it allows me to use a lower ISO to get much better detail in my images.