Author Topic: White Light  (Read 1207 times)

Jermaine Conner

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Re: White Light
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2018, 04:06:30 PM »
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I have found solar viewing to be very rewarding so far... and since I work evenings (14:00 to 23:00), sometimes that is all the viewing I get to do. Sadly, I don't get much time for solar viewing lately due to all the overtime I am required for.

I too, was a bit concerned about solar viewing at first. But after using my homemade solar filter for a few sessions, I am less nervous about it. I check the filter for pinholes/leakage prior to using it and have had no issues. Following is a picture of my rig:



^^^^ "The Beast", ready for solar viewing... Following is a pic I took with my iPhone 6 through the eyepiece...
^^^^ there were a couple of sunspots in the upper left quadrant, but the iPhone couldn't resolve them.

I have since used the green W # 58 filter that Reptilicus recommended and it does indeed help with detail.

All in all, I have been very pleased with this aspect of the hobby. The cost? About $15 for the Thousand Oaks solar film from Amazon and the green filter came in a set of 4 for about $29.

Clear skies guys!

CB

What color filter did you use here? Looks orange. I kind of like this!

Jared Morgan

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Re: White Light
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2018, 05:22:20 PM »
Hi Steve!

The color is from the Thousand Oaks filter film from Amazon. I will try to provide the link later, I am on a break at work right now.

Best regards!

CB

Jose Melo

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Re: White Light
« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2018, 05:51:41 PM »
Wow, Orange tinted solar film! Had not heard of that.

I use the Baader white film for maximum resolution. I do like the look of that orange sun a little better, even though it's not natural.

Nathan Mayienda

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Re: White Light
« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2018, 08:01:31 PM »
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Sounds like you're walking that path the right way, with appropriate care and caution.

A small matter that is often not mentioned: if you have an optical finder mounted to the telescope, cap the objective lens. I burned a hole in a coat sleeve, once upon a time, forgetting to do this. Better yet, take the finder scope off. I use one of these to get the sun in view:

http://www.dynapod.com/dyna-hp1.html


I used a PVC pipe connector with some Baader solar film rubber banded across one end of it and it fits over the front of my finder scope pretty well.

Tyler King

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Re: White Light
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2018, 06:39:25 AM »
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Wow, Orange tinted solar film! Had not heard of that.

I use the Baader white film for maximum resolution. I do like the look of that orange sun a little better, even though it's not natural.


The Baader white film comes in both Visual and Imaging types. I mention that just for general information.

I love the film and usually make solar filters throughout the year for my refractors BUT I find that it is so fragile and there is a concern that it may end up with a scratch or pin-hole that I can't see then burn my eyes.

So just take very good care of it and change it out often.

malphandrafsadd

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Re: White Light
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2018, 10:41:35 AM »
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Wow, Orange tinted solar film! Had not heard of that.

I use the Baader white film for maximum resolution. I do like the look of that orange sun a little better, even though it's not natural.


The film is not orange tinted actually, or mine isn't anyway. It is almost black in color when just looking at it off the scope. But when viewing the sun, it imparts an orange hue to the solar disk. I find it more appealing than the Baader film.

CB