Author Topic: Wow! Andromeda for the first time  (Read 32 times)

nonbuysalcho

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Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« on: December 24, 2017, 04:20:46 AM »
I recently put my present 5" Celestron OTA on a brand new Nexstar SE bracket and have been enjoying it immensely.  When I got the scope in '99, I longed to watch Andromeda but it was just too hard to locate.

Another night, I had been outside in the field and the extent was aligned perfectly.  My first object of choice and it found it no problem.

It wasa small wispy looking patch of light but the fundamental place was definitely brighter and that I believe there was a companion galaxy too since there was another small patch of light nearby.

I gota collection of Bobs Knobs to help in collimation and I have been more than pleased with the scope's optics because collimating.

Excited about putting a great deal of hours on this setup.

RickR90s



Cory Bass

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2017, 03:06:56 PM »
Congrats. The companion galaxy is probably M32. There is another companion, M110, but it is much harder to see visually. Picture is in this link:

http://www.lcas-astr...challenge11.jpg

(That is probably alot higher resolution than what you saw :-)

John Weiland

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2018, 05:46:09 AM »
Andromeda is fun to look at (and look for) through all kinds of equipment. I can usually manage to find it even in fairly substantial light pollution, using something as humble as 7x50 binoculars
Sent from my D6603 using Tapatalk

cicacating

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2018, 05:48:55 AM »
Congratulations on locating M31. You might find some of the information presented in my post athttp://www.cloudynig...ur-astronomers/ interesting.

Dave Mitsky

Robert Estrada

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2018, 08:57:45 AM »
Good work. 

I hope to see andromeda in a telescope soon.

reilpipohen

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2018, 12:03:30 AM »
I was trying to aim for it last night. Didn't go as planned

byhodete

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2018, 02:02:55 AM »
Quote
Congrats. The companion galaxy is probably M32. There is another companion, M110, but it is much harder to see visually. Picture is in this link:

http://www.lcas-astr...challenge11.jpg

(That is probably alot higher resolution than what you saw :-)


Actually IME M110 is more conspicuous. In smaller apertures M32 is near-stellar, and often missed. Greg N

flasattecof

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2018, 06:36:33 PM »
Quote
Quote

Congrats. The companion galaxy is probably M32. There is another companion, M110, but it is much harder to see visually. Picture is in this link:

http://www.lcas-astr...challenge11.jpg

(That is probably alot higher resolution than what you saw :-)


Actually IME M110 is more conspicuous. In smaller apertures M32 is near-stellar, and often missed. Greg N

Interesting, I had the opposite experience, but admittedly I have only seen the satellites once ever while at a dark(er) site. I saw what I assumed was M32 pretty easily, but M110 I could only pick up by tilting the dob back and forth and catching its motion. I wonder if the difference is that there was enough light pollution when I was looking that M32 became more apparent simply because I could not see the outer disk of M31 making the (yes, near stellar) M32 more isolated and apparent? Of course at home I see a single smudge :-)

swarfestmatvo

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2018, 07:01:25 PM »
M32 is closer to M31 and at low power does resemble a star somewhat. Both M32 and M110 have similar integrated magnitudes (8.1 versus 8.5, 8.1 versus 8.1, depending upon the source) but M32 has a much higher surface brightness, 12.7 (12.5) versus 13.9 (14.0) magnitudes per square arc minute for M110, depending upon the source, which makes M32 far easier to see from less-than-dark sites.

http://messier.seds.org/m/m032.html

https://dso-browser....104/m-32/galaxy

http://messier.seds.org/m/m110.html

https://dso-browser....88/m-110/galaxy

Dave Mitsky

nepaletha

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 03:25:24 AM »
Quote
M32 is closer to M31 and at low power does resemble a star somewhat. Both M32 and M110 have similar integrated magnitudes (8.1 versus 8.5, 8.1 versus 8.1, depending upon the source) but M32 has a much higher surface brightness, 12.7 (12.5) versus 13.9 (14.0) magnitudes per square arc minute for M110, depending upon the source, which makes M32 far easier to see.

http://messier.seds.org/m/m032.html

https://dso-browser....104/m-32/galaxy

http://messier.seds.org/m/m110.html

https://dso-browser....88/m-110/galaxy

Dave Mitsky


I'm not arguing the stats. I find M32 very easy to see. I'm just sayin' that when you're showing all three to the public, as I have often, they see M110 first--as in very quickly--and have to look a while and be coached before they "get" that M32 is a galaxy.  I call that "easier to see." Greg N

Jeremiah Greer

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2018, 10:27:07 AM »
Some of the last DSOs that I observed last night from the ASH Naylor Observatory were M31, M32, and M110 at 162x (40mm University Optics MK-70). The conditions were only so-so and the telescope I was using, a 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain with a focal length of almost 6.5 meters, is the exact opposite of a rich-field instrument so only the core of M31 was visible without slewing.

Dave MitskyAttached Thumbnails


Jon Beckner

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2018, 02:24:25 AM »
Quote
Quote

M32 is closer to M31 and at low power does resemble a star somewhat. Both M32 and M110 have similar integrated magnitudes (8.1 versus 8.5, 8.1 versus 8.1, depending upon the source) but M32 has a much higher surface brightness, 12.7 (12.5) versus 13.9 (14.0) magnitudes per square arc minute for M110, depending upon the source, which makes M32 far easier to see.

http://messier.seds.org/m/m032.html

https://dso-browser....104/m-32/galaxy

http://messier.seds.org/m/m110.html

https://dso-browser....88/m-110/galaxy

Dave Mitsky


I'm not arguing the stats. I find M32 very easy to see. I'm just sayin' that when you're showing all three to the public, as I have often, they see M110 first--as in very quickly--and have to look a while and be coached before they "get" that M32 is a galaxy.  I call that "easier to see." Greg N

Note the edit that I made to my post prior to your post, "far easier to see from less-than-dark sites". M110 is quite difficult to see from a light-polluted area.

I also have some experience doing public outreach, well over 20 years worth.

Dave Mitsky

John Trujillo

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2018, 06:51:59 PM »
Happy for youRickR90s that you grabbed M31. Your post inspired me to get down to the shore of a small little I live by and I had my first late summer look at M31 with my 10x50's tonight a couple hours before the moon came up. Always a late summer / early fall ritual when we get less daylight and some dark sky and it did not disappoint. Visible naked eye and very nice in my old 10x50's. And 3 nicebolides streaking from Pegasus to Altair as a bonus. Also as we get more dark skies up here as summer ends, the Milky Way in Cygnus was starting to show the dark lanes. Thanks for the inspirational post RickR90s.

Jamal Plump

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2018, 05:26:36 AM »
Hi RickR90s, congrats on the observation and I enjoy this type of enthusiasm and exhuberence. I had the same excitement as you with my first observation of Andromeda. My reaction was something like "wow Andromeda is amazing...hey what's that other galaxy nearby?"

Try using various EPs to seewhat the galaxy looks like at different magnifications. I am able to see the expanse of Andromeda at low magnifications on good nights. This galaxy can be very impressive and is always high on my list to observe.

Lasaro Tourabi

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Re: Wow! Andromeda for the first time
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2018, 01:01:15 AM »
I will simply echo 110 tho larger early attempts escaped me in my smaller scopes. Gets easier in larger scopes, recently my 12 inch are a pleasure to catch. Definitely dark sky makes life easier as well.

Also comment a little practice and can manually locate M31 abit easier. My favored is using the span from cassopeia W constellation.