Author Topic: Planetary Eyepieces  (Read 260 times)

closfockralperp

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Planetary Eyepieces
« on: December 27, 2017, 10:30:42 AM »
Hi all,
I'm looking for some suggestions for planetary eyepieces.  I currently have some Naglers that are great, but the sight coloring around the planets is bothering me.  Eye relief is more important than field of view, and budget wise I'm willing to save up for a quality eyepiece.  These would be used in my 12" f4.9 dob, but Id like to pick up a 4" refractor in the next few years as well.
Thanks,
Charles



Levi Cruse

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2017, 11:55:33 AM »
Quote
Hi all,
I'm looking for some suggestions for planetary eyepieces. I currently have some Naglers that are great, but the sight coloring around the planets is bothering me. Eye relief is more important than field of view, and budget wise I'm willing to save up for a quality eyepiece. These would be used in my 12" f4.9 dob, but Id like to pick up a 4" refractor in the next few years as well.
Thanks,
Charles

Take a look at these. https://www.astronom...pieces_c52.aspx You will be surprised just how nice they are. I have the 8 15 and 18mm and the 8mm is particularly good when the seeing is good looking at Planets. The cost is also low. Worth checking out.

outatnoha

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2017, 06:52:39 AM »
I find the Delites and Delos are color neutral with very good contrast. I have tried many of them and would recommend the 7mm Delite.
A 7mm will give you ~ 213x and of course the eye relief is close to 20mm.

tiocartratca

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2017, 08:32:20 PM »
Quote
Hi all,
I'm looking for some suggestions for planetary eyepieces. I currently have some Naglers that are great, but the sight coloring around the planets is bothering me. Eye relief is more important than field of view, and budget wise I'm willing to save up for a quality eyepiece. These would be used in my 12" f4.9 dob, but Id like to pick up a 4" refractor in the next few years as well.
Thanks,
Charles

I binoview with my 12" dob, and the best planetary views I have ever had in 40 years of observing has been using a pair of Baader Hyperion zooms. For me, the difference has been found in the ability to track seeing quality with magnification changes.

The zooms dramatically improved my solar white light viewing because daytime seeing varies even more than night time seeing, but it is within those brief periods of improved seeing that happen during a session that you will resolve the most detail and if you don;t have an eyepiece loaded that lets you exploit those brief moments of improved seeing, then you miss that detail.

I have see stunning detail on Jupiter and Saturn on night of so-so seeing because I could instantly respond to those precious moments of good seeing.

I do 100% of my high resolution observing now using zooms and binoviewer. By far the best planetary results of my life.

In my own opinion, the best "Planetary" eyepiece you can use is the one that has just the right amount of magnification in the moments that you need it most.

Mike Brown

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2017, 09:46:41 AM »
For single eyepiece viewing, you don’t need a zoom eyepiece to get a “zoom-like-effect” of continuous power ranges. A regular barlow and an eyepiece will do sort of the same thing. Just pull the eyepiece up in the barlow and that will increase the power, allowing a “continuous” range of magnifications.

It is very rare (in my area) for the “nighttime” seeing to change so drastically that a barlow and 2 eyepieces would not cover the complete continuous range of magnifications needed just by pulling the eyepiece up in the barlow.

Bob

Michael Presley

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2017, 08:18:20 PM »
Quote
Hi all,
I'm looking for some suggestions for planetary eyepieces. I currently have some Naglers that are great, but the sight coloring around the planets is bothering me. Eye relief is more important than field of view, and budget wise I'm willing to save up for a quality eyepiece. These would be used in my 12" f4.9 dob, but Id like to pick up a 4" refractor in the next few years as well.
Thanks,
Charles

I just got a few of the TV Delites. They are relatively light, compact, have a very flat field right to the edge, show little if any edge color, are very sharp, have very good mechanics/ergonomics, and are very comfortable with 20mm ER. All good stuff.

Bob

Marvin Neboet

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2018, 08:51:08 AM »
Meade UWA 5.5mm

Kapil Majmudar

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2018, 01:14:31 PM »
Depends upon your primary planetary scope.

If it is the f/4.9 Dob and you have no tracking, somewhat of a compromise. Go with more field. The shorter (10 and below) Pentax XW's are awesome. Possibly a zoom (Leica or Baader), I love my Leica ASPH and it does great in both roles (planetary and wide field). So much so that I sold off everything below 22mm excepting a single Supermono.

If it is the refractor, you'll have more latitude to go with a real planetary eyepiece. Many designs and makers to choose from in all price ranges, but a quality Ortho would be a good starting point to see if you like the minimalist glass option. Not too expensive and easy to resell if you don't like it. In which case, it takes you back to the Pentax XW's.

nepaletha

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2018, 08:33:39 AM »
All 82 degree eyepieces are 'junk' for planetary detail, unless you like soft and fuzzy views. If you can't afford Delos by Televue or Pentax XW's try used Radians also by Televue. They go for around $150 and there are a lot for sale and they sell fast. I have not found anything under $150 that can match the above three.

longtichaten

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2018, 09:05:23 PM »
<p style="margin-left:40px">In my opinion for the best planetary views you want as little glass as possible, excellent polish to reduce scatter, and good multicoatings to increase contrast. You don't need wide fields because the target will be small and centered. The best of the best that have been available in the past twenty years or so were the TMB Supermonocentrics, but these are tough to come by these days. An excellent performer that is available are, as previously mention, a quality Orthoscopic.

Christopher Patel

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2018, 11:12:32 PM »
Quote
All 82 degree eyepieces are 'junk' for planetary detail, unless you like soft and fuzzy views. If you can't afford Delos by Televue or Pentax XW's try used Radians also by Televue. They go for around $150 and there are a lot for sale and they sell fast. I have not found anything under $150 that can match the above three.
Delos and XWs are good but not so much better than the 82º Type 6 Nagler, that they should be called "junk". The Naglers I have are not soft and fuzzy on anything. I also have four element plossls and orthos that are marginally, if better at all, than the Type 6s. Of course, none of these is as good as my 5.1mm XO.

ivirlocri

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2018, 05:55:51 AM »
Quote
Quote
All 82 degree eyepieces are 'junk' for planetary detail, unless you like soft and fuzzy views. If you can't afford Delos by Televue or Pentax XW's try used Radians also by Televue. They go for around $150 and there are a lot for sale and they sell fast. I have not found anything under $150 that can match the above three.

Delos and XWs are good but not so much better than the 82º Type 6 Nagler, that they should be called "junk". The Naglers I have are not soft and fuzzy on anything. I also have four element plossls and orthos that are marginally, if better at all, than the Type 6s. Of course, none of these is as good as my 5.1mm XO.
Agreed. Opinion is one thing, but hyperbole is another. I don't have an XO, but I've got a 5.2XL, a 5 Tak LE, a 5 UO ortho, a 5 TMB Supermono, and a 5T6. The Nagler is far from soft and fuzzy to my eye. But then, I wouldn't speak for everyone else. P.s.....got a 5 Radian too, and a Nagler 3-6 zoom.

Rob Stevens

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2018, 11:46:49 AM »
What isthe eye relief you'd like? I am a big fan of Plossl's, Ortho's, Brandon's, but for Jupiter or Saturn there is some scatter and it varies, the scatter can seemingly be reduced by Barlowing but I think this affects different folks differently.

calfkommomu

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2018, 04:56:44 PM »
Quote
Hi all,
I'm looking for some suggestions for planetary eyepieces. I currently have some Naglers that are great, but the sight coloring around the planets is bothering me. Eye relief is more important than field of view, and budget wise I'm willing to save up for a quality eyepiece. These would be used in my 12" f4.9 dob, but Id like to pick up a 4" refractor in the next few years as well.
Thanks,
Charles

There can be a mix of things involved here.

12" resolves way more planetary detail then smaller scopes, like a 4", or 6", 8" and even a bit more then a 10".
So seeing can become a significant issue at this kind of aperture.

Seeing atmospherically, in the regional weather.
Locally, at the observing site: on pavement vs on grass vs near buildings vs in valley vs on hill.
The seeing at the primary's boundary layer is a really big one.

IME, seeing, collimation and cooling make bigger difference then the ep, when up around 12" and visiting planets.

Modest fov options clip off intrusive coma, when using a fast newt.
Well corrected fixes off axis astigmatism.
Most mid priced anything works good on axis, as long as it gets you to the magnification you seek... and the seeing in the region, your chosen observing site, and within the ota... will support that magnification.

Mid priced, not modest priced.
There is a lot of light coming in at 12", so real budget priced ep's, particularly budget wide field, end up with a lot of scatter on bright planets.

Also, coloring around planets can be atmospheric.

Donnell Keown

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Re: Planetary Eyepieces
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2018, 01:59:48 AM »
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Quote
Depends upon your primary planetary scope.

If it is the f/4.9 Dob and you have no tracking, somewhat of a compromise.


I forgot to mention my dob has tracking.
Quote

What isthe eye relief you'd like?

I'd like to be in the 10-20mm range.<p class="citation">izar187, on 24 Jan 2017 - 8:10 PM, said:<a href="https://www.cloudynights.com/index.php?app=forums&amp;module=forums&amp;section=findpost&amp;pid=7665701" rel="citation">[/url]<blockquote class="ipsBlockquote built" data-author="izar187" data-cid="7665701" data-time="1485281408">

Also, coloring around planets can be atmospheric.
I didn't realize the atmosphere would cause coloring on the planets.