Author Topic: ** 2018 Mars opposition **  (Read 309 times)

Tim Massey

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2018, 11:05:00 PM »
I got a little curious about the statistics so I found a NASA article about the opposition.

The 2003 opposition was the closest in almost 60,000 years previous. And after the 2018 opposition, the 2003 record will stand until the opposition on August 28, 2287. I don't know about the rest of you, but I doubt I'll be around for that one.

So, since the difference in how close Mars will be between the 2003 and the 2018 is only around 1.98 KM, I'll take it.

Lets put it this way, the 2018 opposition will be the second closest in almost 60,270 years!!

Seth Mamidi

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2018, 08:34:23 AM »
Quote
...

Lets hope for clear skies!!


Let's hope for clear skies on Mars, too!!!

I'd have to check my notes, (and please correct me if I'm wrong) but I seem to recall that at the last good opposition, Mars spent a good amount of time enveloped in a global dust storm. If the next opposition puts Mars in a similar orbital position (season) we might have to deal with that again. Nonetheless, I do look forward to a 24 arc second Mars.

Alex

frenafverbi

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2018, 03:08:40 AM »
Yes, we need good weather on both planets please.

faubloginac

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2018, 06:36:27 AM »
Shhh!!!
You wanta jinx it?

foarehortalp

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2018, 08:09:43 AM »
I look forward to the close proximity of Mars' 2018 pass. There are so many elusive details on Mars that I've hoped to observe and sketch. The downside of a Mars close encounter is that it will appear very bright.

Mars appeared extremely bright in 2016. So much so that it overwhelmed my telescope with glare and thereby obscuring much surface detail. Hazy nights helped tone down the planet enough for some nice views. For 2018, I want to have the appropriate filters on hand so that I can make the most of the event.

The epidemic of blue-light pollution that is sweeping the night sky may actually work in our favor for enhancing our experience with Mars this next time around.
What filters should I have in my kit?
------------
C

Opposition should occur approximately in the wee morning hours on 27 July. It's going to be riding low in the ecliptic, a little to the right of and near the bottom of the "V" of Capricorn. It's just a little bit above the 2X atmosphere level where air turbulence and attenuation really become noticeable. Also, nearly a full-Moon event. I don't think that the full Moon is that much of detriment to Mars observation.

This apparition appears to be setting up to be a bonanza for observers in the southern hemisphere.

Scott Bentley

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2018, 10:22:41 PM »
At 43N
Altitude 21degrees.
Not too excited.

Sam

inuninab

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2018, 11:42:46 AM »
Sorry Sam.

What is pretty cool, Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, Uranus, Plutoand Venus should also all be in the sky in the same night along with Mars.

Nate Flores

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2018, 02:37:51 PM »
Quote
What filters should I have in my kit?
------------
C

All of them.

I'm not kidding.

In 2016 I used #15 yellow and #82a Blue a lot. I've heardthat Orange and Redcan beuseful, as can #56 Green. Since 2016 I've added Magenta and Salmon to the kit and have recently discovered, and like, the Baader Contrast Booster.

sandsibyno

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #23 on: January 23, 2018, 03:53:54 PM »
Quote
Wish there was an inexpensive telescope that would be good for AP for Mars. Everything I have currently has a focal length of 1000 mm or less. I guess I need to order a super barlow.

I have a 6" f/8 sky-Watcher newtonian that has turned out to be an excellent planetary telescope. They go for about $200-$250 new, OTA only. Smooth optics, very high contrast.Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

dogswargersdurch

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2018, 06:56:23 PM »
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Right, 2003 was closest in "modern astronomy" times but I'm not going to let you guys burst my bubble. I'm still excited...LOL


I met my to be wife at a party I threw at my house to celebrate that opposition....any excuse to have a party when I was single ;-)

Danny Rodriguez

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2018, 11:16:22 PM »
-25.8° puts it about where Saturn has been, and that has been OK at my latitude (33-35°N) this year.
For me, that will put Mars a little over 30° from the horizon at culmination (2 atmospheres), about the same as M8 or a tiny bit lower.
At my high altitude site, that'll be an extinction factor of about 0.15 magnitude, so it should be very bright.
[It'll be overhead for Australian, South African, and South American observers.]

What people report:
Blue filter--reveals clouds on the limb and, in big scopes, on the volcanoes. Also, makes the ice cap stand out.
Yellow filter--enhances dust storms and lighter features like Hellas.
Orange filter--makes dark markings stand out more while still seeing the lighter features.
Red-orange filter--best for dark markings
Red filter--same, but for much larger apertures
Magnenta filter--enhances both blue and red details, i.e. clouds, ice cap, and dark markings

All the above tend to dim the image somewhat, especially at high power.
Baader Contrast Booster--dims the image only a small amount, so can be used at very high powers.
It seems to bring out dark markings, light markings, dust storms, and dark details around and through the ice cap better than any other filter I've tried.
If someone has a filter that works better, I'd like to know about it. For right now, this is my "Go-To" Mars filter.

I've tried all the "Mars" filters out there, and they all tend to scatter a lot of light. They seem to try to duplicate the magenta filter using dichroic coatings.

Adam Mann

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #26 on: January 30, 2018, 04:41:14 AM »
Thanks for the tip Don. I have the color filters, although I don't use them very often because I've never seen any improvement from them. However, from what you say the Baader Contrast Booster filter sounds interesting. I may have to flex my Visa card again.

How does it work on Saturn and Jupiter?

Jayarajan Mcloven

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #27 on: January 30, 2018, 05:25:40 AM »
Quote
Thanks for the tip Don. I have the color filters, although I don't use them very often because I've never seen any improvement from them. However, from what you say the Baader Contrast Booster filter sounds interesting. I may have to flex my Visa card again.

How does it work on Saturn and Jupiter?

Saturn--no, it doesn't work well unless you enjoy a yellowish-orange Saturn. It reduces detail as far as I can see.
Jupiter--there is some improvement in details at low power, but Jupiter shows more details at high power without a filter.
It acts like a very warm filter--enhancing reds, browns, oranges, but not doing well on a lot of detail in Jupiter's lighter belts.
I view it as a Mars filter only.
[and, of course, a minus violet filter for achromatic refractors, the original intention of the filter's design.]

stalafovkith

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #28 on: January 30, 2018, 07:18:44 AM »
I looked and a 2" filter is around $125 or more. Kind of expensive for a single use filter. I'll have to think about it. Like I said, I haven't found too many filters that offer improvement IMO.

But, this is a special,twice in a lifetimeevent so the price may be worth it.

nasapehe

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Re: ** 2018 Mars opposition **
« Reply #29 on: January 30, 2018, 08:09:25 AM »
No. Mars has two close oppositions about every 17 years (+/1).
There's another close one in 2020.