Author Topic: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.  (Read 495 times)

canreosenbi

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Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« on: December 28, 2017, 09:41:42 PM »
Not to hit a hornet's nest with a stick, but....where can I find images that look real? Last night I was observing Orion with my 12" dob and went on line to check what I thought I was seeing. Big mistake! All the images looked like acid trips and not one was the same color. I ended up having to use "sketches", but then again, up to interpretation of the artist.  Is there a source for black and white images that show only the detail observable to the human eye?



breadexgera

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2017, 05:23:49 AM »
Well, that's a tall order. By nature, cameras accumulate light in a way the human eye does not.

I'm an advocate of what you might call image processing with a light touch, without exaggeration of colors, etc. But the camera still sees more than the eye does, often tremendously more, and sees it in color at all light intensities.

The sketches in Mallas and Kreimer'sMessier Album may be the kind of thing you are looking for.

Jeremy Swaine

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2017, 01:23:10 AM »
I'll check them out, thanks.

Jim Snyder

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2017, 12:43:01 PM »
Just Google Monochrome M42...etc. etc. It will give you the black and white versions of astrophotography captures.

Chris Goldsby

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2017, 01:01:45 PM »
Sketches are generally closer than astroimages. But, be sure to adjust for aperture, focal length, and eyepiece.
There is a book called, I think, " photographic atlas of the universe. " but it is about the sky itself, not deep space objects.
Alex

Jason Meyer

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2018, 04:48:32 AM »
Quote
Not to hit a hornet's nest with a stick, but....where can I find images that look real? Last night I was observing Orion with my 12" dob and went on line to check what I thought I was seeing. Big mistake! All the images looked like acid trips and not one was the same color. I ended up having to use "sketches", but then again, up to interpretation of the artist.  Is there a source for black and white images that show only the detail observable to the human eye?

Humans are restricted to only being able to see electromagnetic radiation (light) in an extremely limited range of wavelengths - between about 400 to 700 nm - of theelectromagnetic spectrum.
However the Orion nebula, and the surrounding part of the sky, are flooded with boatloads of light outside that very limited 400 to 700 nm range.
So humans can only see a very limited part of what is 'real'.

Which is why our understanding of the things 'out there' ramped up dramatically when astronomers started imaging above and below the extremely limited range of human vision.

Gandza Startley

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2018, 06:53:55 AM »
You should definitely look at sketches instead of astrophotography. Most astrophotographers aren't intending to match what is seen in the eyepiece, they want pretty pictures with lots of detail that the eye can't see.

Greg Fleming

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2018, 01:05:39 AM »
Take a look at the BT-Atlas Images from C2A. Adjust the brightness of the images.
http://www.astrosurf...glish/index.htm
http://www.astrosurf...sh/download.htm
http://www.astrosurf...ml/BT-Atlas.htmAttached Thumbnails


Chris Ingram

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2018, 04:38:50 AM »
I use astrophotographs much of the time as guides during session planning and often at the eyepiece especially for threshold objects such as supernovae, for which the discovery images can be useful. Those pics are more like photographic charts than artistic photos. But the color pics of objects are useful too. Part of the issue is calibrating your expectation. You may look at a pic of NGC281, for instance, and see the PacMan Nebula in Hubble palate and say that it is nothing like you see at the eyepiece but it can be useful for establishing locations for the dark globules and details that you may later search out.

Sketches can be useful but many also look far different than what I see. Often they are distorted and confusing. I do not mean to criticize the skill and vision of the sketcher but we use different instruments and we just ARE different. My poor sketches look like stick figures and squiggles so I respect anybody that can present ANY level of realism. Howard Banich' great sketch of M33 has been essential to my exploration of that object.

For me the key is managing my expectation and building familiarity with the differences between good AP and good visual. I'd recommend you keep looking for useful images. If you can find some that you like they can be very helpful.

I do prefer the more finely detailed but less technicolor style of AP for my uses but , again, any of it is better than my very poor efforts.

Jared Morgan

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2018, 08:17:08 AM »
Quote
Not to hit a hornet's nest with a stick, but....where can I find images that look real? Last night I was observing Orion with my 12" dob and went on line to check what I thought I was seeing. Big mistake! All the images looked like acid trips and not one was the same color. I ended up having to use "sketches", but then again, up to interpretation of the artist.  Is there a source for black and white images that show only the detail observable to the human eye?

Make your own sketches. Draw what you think you see. You will soon see how difficult it is to draw the detail in M42 and why the photos are so varied in appearance. There is no image or sketch of M42 that looks "real."

slotiniphin

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2018, 11:14:09 AM »
As a visual observer myself, I'm temped to try afocal imaging with my iphone and an app to control the parameters just enough to be able to capture what I see at the eyepiece and nothing more. I hope it's possible to find the perfect parameters to replicate what I see at the eyepiece...

Isaac Griffin

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2018, 11:38:30 AM »
A cell phone pic of M42...
^^^ Pretty much what I saw through the eyepiece, except I could see 4 of the Trapezium stars in the eyepiece instead of the 3 shown here. I didn't get the lighting exactly right, so the 4th star got kinda lost. This image is a far cry from what most images of M42 look like but does represent what you will likely see in your scope (aperture and image scale dependent).

My recommendation? More scope time looking for and at stuff and less internet time chasing images and sketches that can never truly depict what YOUR scope will present to YOUR eye.

Keep looking up and happy hunting!

CB


Edward Johnston

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2018, 05:05:57 AM »
Quote
Not to hit a hornet's nest with a stick, but....where can I find images that look real? Last night I was observing Orion with my 12" dob and went on line to check what I thought I was seeing. Big mistake! All the images looked like acid trips and not one was the same color. I ended up having to use "sketches", but then again, up to interpretation of the artist.  Is there a source for black and white images that show only the detail observable to the human eye?

If you have a DSLR and a tripod, you can take single exposures and get a feel of what th night sky and stars are like to your eye. Also you can try your phone at the eyepiece.

behelphyri

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2018, 12:51:14 PM »
Thanks for all the comments, pretty helpful. I checked out the "Messier Album" and definitely will be picking one up. Also I think the smartphone pics are what I am looking for.  I realize that imaging shows what we can't see, but for me at least, a monochrome image that represents a 20" dobs view would be the most helpful.

gritinname

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Re: Astrophotography that looks real, not all jazzed up.
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2018, 04:20:54 PM »
To the OP. Download any astro image. Use a free image processor to change it to B&W. Now dim it until it's barely visible. There. Now you have a much better approximation of what most people can see by eye.