Author Topic: Gonna take 300 high school students to see the Solar Eclipse-What could go wrong  (Read 52 times)

James Runninger

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I am a high school Physics/Engineering teacher at a small PBL based high school in Evansville, IN. (http://www.evansvill.../real-world-now) In my teaching experience of 31 years, I have introduced students to Astronomy with borrowed telescopes or telescopes that I have picked up at yard sales. ( http://www.cloudynig...-i-ever-spent/) That first year I showed students sunspots, and the rings of Saturn; one of those original students became a science teacher and is now my principal!

I got away from Astronomy for several years but got the bug again last summer after finding that RV-6 last summer. I have started an Astronomy club at our high school and have recently acquired a Celestron 8SE from a donor. The kids and I are very excited, but the weather has been rotten for some time. However, with the solar eclipse coming in August of 2017 we have a unique opportunity as we are only 70 miles from Hopkinsville or Princeton, KY which will have a 2:40 second duration of the eclipse. We plan to take all of our students to experience this once in a lifetime event, but I want to them to see this in a number of different ways. This is where I need your help, and the members of Cloudy Nights have been more than helpful on several occasions in the past.

I want to purchase a dedicated solar scope (Lunt or Coronado?) , tripod, a video camera, and a solar filter for the 8SE, along with several Sunspotter Solar Scopes. What equipment would you recommend for this? Is there anything that I should be considering?

I have a number of goals with the Astronomy club’s future:
1) To get my students comfortable enough with the telescopes so they can do outreach programs at other schools and with adults.
2) To build an observatory so the school can have access to the telescope from their computer at home. Our school is in the Career and Tech Center and the students have the ability to design and build the observatory under one roof. (http://www.edlinesit..._Programs/SICTC)