Author Topic: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17  (Read 306 times)

Jeremy Swaine

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2018, 07:38:47 AM »
Well done, for those who have spotted this Cheshire cat-like star!

Mira was definitely on my observing list last week when I was down south, but finding Pallas took longer than I thought, especially where there were a lot more clouds than I thought there'd be. And you know you're in a faint part of the heavens when Beta Fornacis enters the field of view and appears dazzling.

Mira is far north enough for me to spot from Ontario. I just have to get myself far enough outside!

quetafulra

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2018, 07:39:42 AM »
I think I read somewhere the "Mira" Sorvino was named by her Father for this star, - and I just assumed "Miramax" movie's got their name from it's variable status. Probably wrong on both counts.

tradneedcoegen

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2018, 09:32:54 AM »
Similar to 69 Cet tonight (mag 5.25). Mira is on the steepest part of its light curve right now, and it's pretty cool to see a change over just one day.

dextcinthrervest

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2018, 11:42:27 PM »
When observing Mira telescopically don't overlook Mira B, its 9th magnitude white dwarf companion...

piatimascomp

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2018, 07:39:59 AM »
Quote
When observing Mira telescopically don't overlook Mira B, its 9th magnitude white dwarf companion...


Mira B is not visually observable in any amateur telescope, being too close to the primary to be resolved. By pure chance there is a magnitude 9.3 field star situated about 2'-3' almost due east of Mira itself, but this star has no actual association with the variable.BrooksObs

James Pederson

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2018, 11:51:21 PM »
Quote
I think I read somewhere the "Mira" Sorvino was named by her Father for this star, - and I just assumed "Miramax" movie's got their name from it's variable status. Probably wrong on both counts.

The given name of Mira was in common usage ages before the discovery of the variable star of the same appellation. Although carrying various meanings in different languages, its most common interpretation in more modern times is "the wonderful" or simply "wonderful" and thus appropriate as a female given name. The variable star was basically given the name for the same reason that parents might name their beloved baby girl the same appellation. So, most situations in which it makes it appearance today are simply coincidental to the naming of the variable.

BrooksObs.

Christian Shim

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2018, 01:36:08 AM »
It has always struck me as remarkable that, although David Fabricius saw Mira in 1596, it was first believed to be a nova, and its periodic nature was not established until seven more decades had passed. Often credit for discovering the periodicity of Mira is given to Johannes Holwarda. He saw the star appear, decline in brightness, and reappear after 11 months. However, one reappearance doesn't seem enough to me to establish its periodic nature. I would follow others in giving the credit for establishing the periodic nature of Mira's variability to Ismail Bouillaud who, building on the observations of Hevelius and others, found a period of 333 days in 1667. In any case, Mira is shining nicely as a naked eye star tonight, at about magnitude 4.4.

finatissau

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2018, 02:59:56 AM »
4.4 sounds about right for tonight: brighter than Xi Psc (4.6) but dimmer than Delta Cet (4.06). I still can't clearly make it out with the naked eye in my red zone skies, but will probably be able to later this week.

scenunhadef

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2018, 05:26:14 AM »
now at mag ~4, an easy spot in 7 x 50s this evening

ovhercayvic

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2018, 10:10:10 PM »
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now at mag ~4, an easy spot in 7 x 50s this evening

Yes - looked similar to or slightly brighter than Delta Cet tonight, and I could just see it with the naked eye for the first time.

Robert Garcia

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Re: Next maximum for Mira in Dec '17
« Reply #25 on: February 03, 2018, 12:05:02 AM »
Mira at Maxima during Christmas Week couldn't be that common, - could it??