Author Topic: Observing Alone  (Read 515 times)

Drew Bullets

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2018, 11:17:46 PM »
Always view alone 99% of the time, and usually at my primary residence.  Decent neighborhood, fenced yard, no worries.  At the other house, about the same, but no fence.  But, it's a small town with a high crime rate, so gotta watch out a little more.  The only varmints there are mostly deer that sometimes follow the creek, although there are copperheads down there that ocasionally wander. 
Zombies?  The good thing about my grab n go scopes is that I can take 'em out with one swing, mount and all.  Or just tell them I don't believe in them.  Horror movies don't spook me.  I love 'em (but not zombie movies).  I'm more afraid of living deadbeats.

Drew Bullets

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2018, 11:49:12 PM »
I carry pepper spray in my briefcase but that's for commuting downtown on public transportation.  Never felt the need for anything while observing.

Jayarajan Mcloven

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2018, 08:05:13 AM »
I know a very dark spot not far from home in an environmental park about 60 yards from a river.Unfortunately, there are crocodiles in the river and even though I should be safe, every small noise unsettles me, so I do not go there very often.

tanktositsoft

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2018, 04:15:01 PM »
Some towns forbid "trespassing" in cemeteries at night, because of vandalism concerns. Best to check with officials before setting up in one.

I've always observed alone, in bear & cougar and rattlesnake country, and even an occasional wolf. Not by choice but circumstance. My observatory offers little protection, as the walls are only 3' high in order to accommodate my 16" dob. I can get down to the horizon with the low walls. Yes, indeed your hearing & fears increase 100% at night!

getneyprotges

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #19 on: January 26, 2018, 01:04:05 AM »
My head is far more nervous in my driveway, in town, at 2am than out in the boonies by myself. I KNOW there are "bad guys" around in my neighborhood because, occasionally, things like cars go missing. Thieves and vandals don't hang out in the middle of nowhere.

However, my heart feels much more nervous out there. As someone said above, hard to overcome thousands of years of instinct.

Robert Spencer

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2018, 01:17:59 AM »
Quote
The boogyman, squatches, things that go bump in the night? I can deal with them but...astro-zombies? Now that's some scary stuff. I knew a guy once that had a very close encounter with an astro-zombie.

The thing sneaked right up on him in the dark, moving so slowly it didn't make a sound and he couldn't even hear it breathing because dead zombies don't breathe. Quickly, he grabbed the nearest thing he could get his hands on, it was a 2-pound Nagler. He threw it, hitting the astro-zombie square in the head. It put a big dent in the zombie's head, forever leaving the words Tele Vue 31mm in reverse lettering across the zombie's forehead. Unfazed the zombie continued to come forward, arms outstretched toward the guy. When he told me the story several years later, he said that he was able to outrun the zombie but, to this day, he was still upset because there was no time to unscrew his O-III filter before tossing the eyepiece.

Brings a whole new meaning to the oft-used moniker of "holy hand grenade" for the 31 Nagler.

---
Michael Mc

faubloginac

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2018, 04:01:40 AM »
I go so far for getting decent skies it's difficult to imagine any of the bad guys showing up.

Robert Spencer

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2018, 06:02:22 AM »
Outreach is with people of course.
But my observing has been solo for most of 40 years.
Always felt, and am far safer out on rural or public land.

Bad live people are a threat telescoping, if there actually is a danger.
However, the after hours site you choose... check it out during the day, ahead of time.
Determine what kind of use it is getting, and the condition of the grounds.
As broken glass, rusted metal, ditches, holes and old foundations, are real hazards in the dark.

bersrorexnutg

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2018, 12:02:47 AM »
I was afraid of the dark until about the age of 14. One night I was standing alone in the dark and got fed up with the ghosts which wouldn't show themselves. So I started yelling at them and calling them names. I dared them to show themselves. They never did. I feel like I am now bigger than the ghosts and no longer fear them.

Santosh Wolf

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2018, 12:19:58 AM »
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I was afraid of the dark until about the age of 14. One night I was standing alone in the dark and got fed up with the ghosts which wouldn't show themselves. So I started yelling at them and calling them names. I dared them to show themselves. They never did. I feel like I am now bigger than the ghosts and no longer fear them.


As a teenager, we lived out in the country. The house and yard had several gates and passage ways. I don't think i was ever afraid of the dark but my brother and I used to enjoy hiding behind a gate or doorway on a dark night just waiting. When my brother would come through the gate, I would slip in behind him and goose him with both hands in the ribs while screaming Yaaah..  that would make him jump just as I would jump when he did it to me.

We tried it on my dad numerous times but it never affected him..

Jon

plurcontitear

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #25 on: February 03, 2018, 01:15:46 AM »
My first couple times at a dark site alone scared me. I was across the street from a wild life provincial park. Elk, bison, even bears potentially.

I was hyper vigilant, but after I stopped worrying and enjoyed the views , I got lost in the experience and my mind was at ease.

I used to bring a knife, but I stopped after a while. Trying to remember everything else is more important.

anpiecaga

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2018, 06:16:00 AM »
Jon,
Afteryou've raised children, nothing scares you. ;-)

pafunsirep

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Re: Observing Alone
« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2018, 08:21:32 AM »
I go out to a nature park 35miles west of my house quite a bit to observe. Sometimes its just me. Other times I have one or two friends join me. When its just me I hear everything. I know my area of Indiana doesn't have bears or mountain lions yet, but they are venturing into our area and will probably be here mating and growing in populations within the next 15 years.

I love listening to owls talking back and forth from one treeline to another. One night I think I heard 4 different species!
Jon