Author Topic: Top things to obeserve in the sky  (Read 437 times)

Robert Porter

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2018, 12:44:24 PM »
Well, you've got a LOT of ideas already. I think the book Turn Left at Orion has been recommended to you in another thread. There are thousands of objects available to you in your darker skies - a book like Turn Left is a great resource.

A common thread in the advice above is good - stick to the Orion and Auriga constellations for now and you'll have a ton of interesting, and different, objects.

getneyprotges

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2018, 09:27:16 PM »
Not sure if this was in the above list but Hind's Crimson Star is worthy. It's a carbon star and pretty interesting. It's other name is R Leporis and it's pretty easy to find. I go from the center star of Orion's belt (Alnilam), out to Rigel, and about that same distance farther out in a "near" straight line. Or find Mintaka in Orion's belt (star that lines up opposite the sword), go out to Rigel and go that distance again further out in a straight line.
Here is what it looks like.http://astronomer.wp...rimson-Star.jpg

linghetade

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2018, 01:14:15 AM »
Here's a list I gave to my high school students in the astronomy club (there really ARE teens into observing, it's crazy, I know). They're new to using a telescope, but quick learners and were picking these off left and right, most for the first time. I use a 6 inch eq reflector and they have a variety of scopes up to 6 inches. Suburban red/yellow zone.

NGC 457/C13 – E.T./Dragonfly Cluster- Bright open cluster, easy to find the two bright eyes. Practice using different magnifications on this target and see what you like the best.NGC 869/C14 – The Double Cluster- Good practice for locating an object that is not right next to a bright star.M34- Spiral Cluster- Same challenge as the Double Cluster, although it is a smaller target. Which two stars will you use to locate it?The Alpha Persei Association- Alpha Persei is Mirphak. Use lowest power or binoculars to get the whole object in view as it is a wide sprinkling of stars.M38 and the Cheshire Cat Asterism- The Cheshire Cat is a large smiley face, so use your lowest power eyepiece to find it. M38 is a bright patch at the corner of the smile, but which side? Try to spot it at low power and hone in on it with higher mag. Which eyepiece/magnification did you think was the best for M38?M37- A medium difficulty, yet highly rewarding open cluster to find. A hazy patch at low power, use gradually increasing magnification to resolve individual stars. How would you describe it?M35- Learn the constellation Gemini. Use Castor’s foot to find M35. If you have found the other clusters on this list, you should be able to spot this one.M42- The Great Nebula in Orion- Use a chart to locate it on Orion’s Sword. Resolve the Trapezium in the nebula as 4 stars. These stars are providing the energy that lights up this emission nebula.

Lamichael Evans

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2018, 12:22:03 AM »
I really appreciateall the great suggestions, I've been writing them all down in my astrology notebook. I checked the weather and the news has changedfor the better, after the winter snow storm tomorrowit's gonna start to clear up and this weekend there'sa good chance there will be some clear viewing and I just can't wait!

Jeffrey Hunter

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2018, 04:05:46 AM »
Quote
I really appreciateall the great suggestions, I've been writing them all down in my astrology notebook.

In your WHAT!??!!!

tamamatte

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2018, 01:31:05 PM »
Quote
Here's a list I gave to my high school students in the astronomy club (there really ARE teens into observing, it's crazy, I know). They're new to using a telescope, but quick learners and were picking these off left and right, most for the first time. I use a 6 inch eq reflector and they have a variety of scopes up to 6 inches. Suburban red/yellow zone.

NGC 457/C13 – E.T./Dragonfly Cluster- Bright open cluster, easy to find the two bright eyes. Practice using different magnifications on this target and see what you like the best.NGC 869/C14 – The Double Cluster- Good practice for locating an object that is not right next to a bright star.M34- Spiral Cluster- Same challenge as the Double Cluster, although it is a smaller target. Which two stars will you use to locate it?The Alpha Persei Association- Alpha Persei is Mirphak. Use lowest power or binoculars to get the whole object in view as it is a wide sprinkling of stars.M38 and the Cheshire Cat Asterism- The Cheshire Cat is a large smiley face, so use your lowest power eyepiece to find it. M38 is a bright patch at the corner of the smile, but which side? Try to spot it at low power and hone in on it with higher mag. Which eyepiece/magnification did you think was the best for M38?M37- A medium difficulty, yet highly rewarding open cluster to find. A hazy patch at low power, use gradually increasing magnification to resolve individual stars. How would you describe it?M35- Learn the constellation Gemini. Use Castor’s foot to find M35. If you have found the other clusters on this list, you should be able to spot this one.M42- The Great Nebula in Orion- Use a chart to locate it on Orion’s Sword. Resolve the Trapezium in the nebula as 4 stars. These stars are providing the energy that lights up this emission nebula.

I've never heard of NGC457 being referred to as "the Dragonfly Cluster" before. I'd heard "Owl Cluster", "Kachina Doll Cluster" and "E.T.Cluster"
I wonder where that name came from. I've seen that cluster for well over 50 years now and never heard the name before, even at star parties.

Ditto with M34's being called the "Spiral Cluster".
Can you recall where you first heard those names?

planvelsynchcest

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2018, 02:04:46 AM »
I never had any luck finding M1. Geez, what kind of astronomer am I, if I can't even find the 1st Messier object! M57 the Ring was much easier to find. M76 the Little Dumbbell is near Perseus. Found it by accident one night star hopping from Cassiopeia to Andromeda. M76 wasn't very impressive in my small scope, but it was still pretty cool to find it.

rackramasca

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2018, 04:32:06 AM »
Don't forget the Moon -- and Saturn when it becomes reasonably well placed before dawn in another month or two. I would say that those are indisputably the two most spectacular telescopic targets in the sky.

The Moon is constantly changing as the shadows shift -- even during a single session if you look carefully. That makes it the gift that goes on giving.

enmofinwins

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2018, 10:03:52 AM »
Quote
I never had any luck finding M1. Geez, what kind of astronomer am I, if I can't even find the 1st Messier object! M57 the Ring was much easier to find. M76 the Little Dumbbell is near Perseus. Found it by accident one night star hopping from Cassiopeia to Andromeda. M76 wasn't very impressive in my small scope, but it was still pretty cool to find it.

Keep trying, you'll find it, but stick to the clearest Moonless nights when it is on the meridian. And eat your carrots.

vidysriret

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Re: Top things to obeserve in the sky
« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2018, 10:39:11 AM »
Dave's list of double stars is a great one -- I always go to Beta Mon this time of year as a test of seeing. If I can split the three components I know it's going to be a good night! Multiple star systems never get old for me . . . they are among those objects one can observe and think "Wow the universe is a marvelously diverse place!"