Author Topic: What magnifications do you use on the planets?  (Read 319 times)

bescoldsearchroom

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2018, 02:21:50 AM »
Using my 8" f 15.5 on Jupiter:

Poor seeing = 175x to 242
Good seeing = 242 to 350
Very good seeing = 350 to 450
Excellent (sub .5 arc second) 450-629x

Saturn in the same conditions is one step up, under exceptional conditions up to 827x

In my other scopes Jupiter 30x per inch max on average nights, Saturn 40x per inch.

cesconali

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2018, 07:10:07 AM »
I use as much magnification as the seeing allows. I use my ES 8.8mm and 11mm a lot of the time. I just got a ES 102APO before Christmas and have had it out three times so far. I got to use my ES 4.7mm and the 6.7mm with it. I have also used the 6.7mm, 8.8mm, and 11mm with my AR152 refractor to good effect.

writgobetfcoo

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2018, 09:51:10 AM »
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Whatever the seeing supports....

Me too. I've used >700x on Saturn and Mars several times when the seeing was excellent. Other times, I start high, and back it off until I get the sharpest view, then stop.
For the Moon, sometimes high, sometimes low. It rewards any magnification gloriously! I find those 100-degree eyepieces especially fun for the Moon.

Ryan Hernandez

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2018, 12:23:03 PM »
For me depends on a couple things, I find that 32-35X per inch of aperture is my maximum magnification I can use on the planets, this results in an exit pupil that is around .8 to .7 and for me thats it.  I don't observe with anything larger than a 6 inch scope, at least not yet, maybe I'll invest in a larger Dob soon.  Last night with Jupiters shadow transit the 4.5mm Delos and my TMB 92SS was providing tack sharp views at 112X when the seeing steadied, I got the 6inch Dob out to see if I could push the magnification and all I did was magnify the bad seeing conditions mostly, so I pretty much stuck with the TMB.  So I guess for me here in Michigan the seeing conditions are always so back and forth I'm at the mercy of the skies when it comes to how much magnification I can use with what scope.

fewithciten

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2018, 06:46:27 PM »
From where I do most of my observing, the western horizon is blocked from view. So Jupiter is the only planetary game in town right now. Regardless of the scope used, I find Jupiter gets interesting at around 150X; much less than that, the image size is too small to suss out details. The upper limit depends on seeing and the scope used, a good night with a dob would be in the 300-350X range.

bumabbefat

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2018, 11:42:14 PM »
I use as much magnification as the seeing and the telescope can handle on the planets. When the seeing is very good or excellent, I've gone as high as 500X with my 15-inch observing Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. My smaller telescopes can deliver excellent views of the planets at 300X or more. Normally though, 200 to 250X is what I use to view the planets because the seeing is at best fair and often it's so bad even 200X is not an option.

Taras

highdanmyne

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2018, 12:07:22 AM »
For Jupiter, 56x is about the minimum I use to see 2 cloud bands. 75x-90x is ok if seeing conditions are crummy. 108-115x is about as high as I go on a good night. 130x just makes Jupiter fuzzier due to weather conditions around here.

For Saturn, 56x is about the minimum for me to see the ring. 108-115x is good for average seeing conditions. I've gone as high as 185x on a good night. My scope won't go much higher than that.

For Mercury, Venus, Mars, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto, I can't see any detail at any magnification under 200x.

coreanoguf

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2018, 04:16:53 AM »
With my 4" mak: 150x on Jupiter; 220 on Saturn and Mars.

Pablo Abreu

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Re: What magnifications do you use on the planets?
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2018, 04:47:05 AM »
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For Mercury, Venus, Mars, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto, I can't see any detail at any magnification under 200x.
You can see plenty on Mars at 110X, but only when it's close to Earth. Right at the moment -- forget it.As for the others, seeing detail on them is a nearly super-human feat. Impossible for Pluto, though a few people have split Charon from Pluto in giant backyard telescopes.I've never seriously attempted to see detail on Venus or Mercury, so I usually use only enough magnification to see their shapes clearly. That varies greatly depending on their distance and phase, but there's rarely much point in going above 100X.Like everyone else, I use as much magnification on Jupiter and Saturn as my telescope and the atmosphere allow. With my 70-mm refractor, I usually use 120X. With my 7-inch Dob, I would love to use 200X or more, but the atmosphere usually makes magnifications above 160X pretty pointless. Fortunately, 160X is enough to show a fair amount of detail on Jupiter, though this planet really begins to open up around 200X.With my 12.5-inch Dob, on rare nights of excellent seeing, Jupiter and Saturn are mind-boggling at 450X.