Author Topic: "Light pollution is always the other guy's fault."  (Read 554 times)

Zack Tucker

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Re: "Light pollution is always the other guy's fault."
« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2018, 12:52:08 AM »
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But, when talking to others in the neighborhood, they didn't notice the intrusive lighting like I hoped they would. Just me, I guess. Anyway, the problem is mostly fixed without them. Thankfully, no one has bothered to re-aim the lighting, including the engineer of the complex. I am sure they never even thought of these things.

This can sometimes work to your advantage. I got a long pole and re-aimed, with the owner's permission, a privately owned streetlight a few doors down from me. Worked wonders, but I was afraid others in the opposite direction would complain. I don't think anyone even noticed. As said, most people stay inside at night with lights on and never even notice the outdoor landscape.

I am fanatical about reducing lighting on our property, so yes, walking the walk. There are 3 small shielded "nightlights" in the driveway, a compromise to the Mrs., and that is it. The porchlight, rarely used, is a recessed fixture with a low wattage bulb. Even the indoor lights are fairly low wattage that all point downward (recessed and tracks...).

William Mendoza

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Re: "Light pollution is always the other guy's fault."
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2018, 03:13:55 AM »
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It could be that city slickers moving or retiring to rural areas are carelessly bringing their city lighting habits with them.
In my part of the world (Columbia County, New York), it is the city slickers who have good lighting practices and the locals who are likely to use glare bombs. I suspect this is typical of much of Appalachia.

People who grow up in this area tend to take the rural environment for granted. Life is tough, jobs are few, young people tend to leave. When the locals are at home, they tend to stay inside and watch TV. The only really popular outdoor activities are ones involving guns.

The transplants move to the area specifically in search of a rural environment. For them, the outdoors is sacred. They're much less likely to hunt (more's the pity -- we have a gross overpopulation of deer) or disturb the outdoor environment in obvious ways, including lighting it up at night. They're much more likely to walk on the rural roads; after all, people from New York City grow up walking as their major form of transportation. Rural people drive to get to their nearest neighbor's house.

I see things from both sides, being a 3rd-generation city transplant, and many of my cousins having lived here all their lives. Needless to say, I don't use glare bombs -- and didn't even before being interested in astronomy.

Yep, my rural roots have me nodding in agreement. Taking things for grantedis the norm. "It is my land, I'll do whatever I want" is the attitudewith regard to junk, water, light, etc. There is an anti-govt./anti-regulation attitude prevalent that is at odds with concerns about light trespass and such. Resistance to any statewide regs will come primarily form them, not the "city slickers."

There are also demographic factors at play. Urban/suburban populations are growing. Truly rural hamlets have been declining--those little "elevator towns" have evaporated over several generations. Iknow the one nearestour farm is pretty much gone and its post office had closed before I was born.Another one in another state thatI lived infor a few years as a small boy has about1/3 as many homes as it had then, and theschool and such had been shut a generation before me (that building is now gone IIRC.)And thatelevator townfared better than the one next to it that still had a school that I went to...when I drove through a dozen years ago the tiny town was nearlygone. The school still remained, but had been soldand was being used as a home...very strange arrangement and I have some stories about that.

What has happened mostly out on the farms that I have seenis that the kids have grown up and taken one of two paths: gone to college and gone where their careers took them or gone to work (or military) right out of college and mostly ended up in towns/cities elsewhere. Few were able to remain on the farm even if that is what they thought they would do. One has to have a bigger operation to make a living off of it, so the smaller farms were mostly aging farmers whose kids grew up while the parents were still in their prime. It is likely to be grandkids taking on the responsibility of the farm ifit isn't sold off instead. This is one of the reasonsthe more rural populations are often shrinking rather than growing.

Suburban sprawl is a different matter. There are a lot of us who grew up on farms who have followed careers into the suburban sprawl and road corridors.

Randy Ott

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Re: "Light pollution is always the other guy's fault."
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2018, 03:33:30 AM »
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Looking at that region on the Light Pollution Map, I see much more evidence of outdoor lighting in a lakefront subdivision, than in the farmland regions a short distance away.
Of course there is! Look at the area in Google Earth and count the number of houses per square mile along the lake and in the farmland. The farms might well put out more light per house, but that's going to be overridden by a 100-fold increase in density.

In any case, there are hardly any farms in Columbia County. Almost all the people living in what used to be farmland before the Great Depression (including me) are second-homers, people who telecommute, and/or people who commute to work, mostly in the nearby cities of Pittsfield and Albany.
The area around my home is far more densely populated than it was when I was growing up here 50 to 60 years ago. Though perhaps still not as densely populated at its peak right after the Boston and Albany Railroad came through before the Civil War. Farming has been going downhill ever since then ...

Derek Vail

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Re: "Light pollution is always the other guy's fault."
« Reply #33 on: February 09, 2018, 06:03:06 AM »
I never use the front post light unless the wife insists for a guest.The back porch lights are not used except when my wife goes to the chicken coop and those are shielded.It is not my fault for sure. Regarding stores, I do not need lights in parking lots. i am fine with the dark. my area is so bad, that the skyglow lights up the area anyway....