Author Topic: A Nobel Prize for Ruining the Night Skies  (Read 179 times)

cromsotejbi

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Re: A Nobel Prize for Ruining the Night Skies
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2018, 09:43:16 AM »
The evidence in Leeds UK is many commercial premises are now installing even brighter yard lights in the last year, most are mounted horizontal and they are blinding when you are in the line of sight. This doesn't look good - what we have now is a way to go brighter that is cheaper than before and the people installing them seem to think horizontal mounting is correct way to do it!

Tyler Cox

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Re: A Nobel Prize for Ruining the Night Skies
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2018, 01:38:05 AM »
Quote
The evidence in Leeds UK is many commercial premises are now installing even brighter yard lights in the last year, most are mounted horizontal and they are blinding when you are in the line of sight. This doesn't look good - what we have now is a way to go brighter that is cheaper than before and the people installing them seem to think horizontal mounting is correct way to do it!


The same folks who are mounting bright Na (sodium) etc. fixtures horizontally or at 45 degree angles will likely do the same with LED fixtures, because they believe it more efficiently spreads the light coverage over areas they want covered, and because they also have relatively little personal awareness (or sensitivity) to the glare and wasteful intrusiveness of such lighting.

teoknoxparli

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Re: A Nobel Prize for Ruining the Night Skies
« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2018, 01:53:13 AM »
Why not use the cheaper and native colored red LED for street lighting? Pedestrians and obstacles would still be visible, and people would not be blinded when driving between lights.

Scott Etrheim

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Re: A Nobel Prize for Ruining the Night Skies
« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2018, 10:29:11 AM »
Sad. Wait till all the car dealerships start using these.

writgobetfcoo

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Re: A Nobel Prize for Ruining the Night Skies
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2018, 01:06:16 PM »
I wonder about telling them that side mounted lights and those at a 45 degree angle are less protected from wind blown debris than pointing straight down where the metal of the fixture protects them more. They will have less breakage in high winds that way.

abtempoecar

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Re: A Nobel Prize for Ruining the Night Skies
« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2018, 01:01:14 AM »
White LEDs are blue LEDs with a phosphor that converts part of the blue light to a broader frequency range, but they still have a blue hump in their spectrum.

One inherent advantage that LEDs have from a light pollution perspective is that they are inherently directional, emitting light in a ~30 degree cone unlike the omnidirectional emitters of every other light technology. This means you have to go to special trouble (and sacrifice illumination efficiency) to make the LED-based lamp emit light in all directions.

This does create a window of opportunity to reduce light pollution if pressure can be applied NOT to do stupid things with LED light fixtures. An outdoor illumination efficiency standard (lumens on the ground per watt) might be a good idea that penalizes lights that don't concentrate light on the ground.

Also taking a "nuisance light" tack might be effective - no one likes light shining directly into their eyes, and it is a real safety hazard while driving at night (who does not hate driving into hi-beams?). Ordinances against such annoying (emphasize the annoyance!) and dangerous lighting practices (emphasize the danger!) should be a much easier to sell than "dark sky" considerations. LED fixtures are a natural fit.

Chuck Klem

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Re: A Nobel Prize for Ruining the Night Skies
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2018, 04:06:48 AM »
At least they can't light streets with the newest LED breakthrough!http://asia.nikkei.c...-is-ultraviolet