Author Topic: Bortle scale accuracy?  (Read 1095 times)

llammenkudi

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Re: Bortle scale accuracy?
« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2018, 03:27:02 AM »
The next step would be, what steps can we take to keep our vision at an ideal level or, even improve it? I wonder if there will be any surgical techniques or medication available in the next few decades to improve the side effects of aging in these areas (specificially scotopic vision.) I know memory and cognitive research has been in the forefront, hopefully this issue is also getting some attention.

multalumiff

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Re: Bortle scale accuracy?
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2018, 09:33:28 AM »
Quote
<p class="citation">QuoteAs a point of information, I do not ascribe to the idea that sensitivity in human vision varies all that much, assuming 20/20 vision and no defects, being governed far, far more by the observer's level of experience. Over the course of half a century I had the opportunity to observe side-by-side with some of the last century's greatest visual observers at excellent sites. Never did I encounter even one that exhibited unique visual sensitivity. In fact, all of them fell within a very narrow range of variation amounting to +/-0.2 magnitudes and all could see no fainter than 7.6-8.0 .

Again, this has been my experience also. It would appear that there is very little difference in perceived limiting magnitude between individuals with good vision, under identical observing circumstances.[/quote]

I wouldn't dispute either statement -- the operant term being "good vision."

Among the 95% of humanity that doesn't have good vision -- me included -- the range of limiting stellar magnitudes under identical skies is huge -- almost two full magnitudes. I have experienced this first-hand.

The major factor is probably acuity. Good daytime acuity doesn't necessary imply good nighttime acuity. Very few people have really sharp vision when their pupils are wide open, even with the best eyeglass correction available.