Author Topic: Is it me?  (Read 1410 times)

Marvin Alexander

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2018, 02:13:18 PM »
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I would look at the Charles Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, which is located on the border of northern border of Nevada and southeastern Oregon. Major cities nearby would be Reno, Boise, and Medford. Closer, smaller cities that may have airports would be Winnemucca, Nevada, Lakeview, Oregon, and Burns, Oregon--but I don't know that for sure. Black zone skies, remote, dry, high steppe country, basalt (so little chance of drilling, etc.), with elevation to 5,000 feet, ballpark. Anywhere along Route 140 around Denio Junction, but my favorite place is Virgin River Campground, just outside the refuge headquarters. People do live around there--ranchers, the occasional gas station/clutch of trailers, some opal mining, government jobs, etc. Nearest food, etc. would be Lakeview, Oregon--a nice place to live. I think anyplace in the SW, my favorite is SE Utah, is doomed by population and development. Also checkout the far northeast tip of California, which has access to the same country around Sheldon Refuge, from Alturas.

If I had to leave the U.S. for really dark skies it would be Chile or Argentina--astounding beautiful country, sophistication, good food and wine (great fishing!). More beautiful than Australia and far fewer nasty beasts.

Good luck. Dark skies.

Jack

Thanks Jack,
Great suggestions.
I agree that the Southeast Utah area will be/is over developed. In many areas there's already light on the horizon from Havasu City, Las Vegas, Phoenix, and all of Southern California.
The the Virgin Valley Campground, NV area is beautiful. Years ago I did a survey in the Royal Peacock Opal Mine area (before they became an RV Park), while I was doing a split consulting gig for Newmont between Elko, Carlin, Battle Mountain, & Winnemucca. Too much light between Elko & Winnemucca although an hour drive North, Northwest provided decent skies.
I've camped & hiked North of Andys Place, NV northwest of Catnip Mnt.; just South of 140 and West of Denio Junction. Stunning skies back then.
IIRC the area north of Andrews, OR around Steens Mountain was great. There'd be a light dome to the NE from Boise, ID (~150 mi.) and Burns is about 70 miles NW, but overall should still be nice. Excellent idea, thanks - I'll look into it. Sounds like a Road Trip! 
Related: We looked ~100 mi. North of Klamath Falls, OR. Surrounded by Winema & Umpqua National Forests but there was too much local light and too many light domes south and west.

Haven't been to Argentina for many years but a good thought! You're correct about it being beautiful, sophisticated, and had outstanding culinary. Yep, far less creepy crawlies and poisonous critters than Australia. Travel wise it'd be a long trip back to the US but we could do it in reasonable 'hops', until Oz. Advantage: areas with four seasons. A few things about Argentina I'm not 'thrilled' with but overall a good suggestion. We'll tuck that one away, thanks.
Did some work with Corporación del Cobre (aka Codelco) in Northern Chile. Eastern area I was in had beautiful dark skies. High plains, cold desert. Back-in-the-Day, travel was a major pain but Southern Chile is totally different. Good thought. We'll look into Chile if we can't find someplace in the US.

Thank you Jack. Excellent ideas, appreciate it.

Leon Vale

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2018, 03:24:39 AM »
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"somewhere 'warmer' than Montana"

There's going to be trade-offs, no matter where you decide to move. I'm more than happy with my 21.5+ average SQM skies, living in the mountains on 20 acres. And even if you find that "perfect" place, absolutely no guarantees that it will remain pristine; if you find it, so will others, with their light pollution!

Now that's the rub. People move way out to get away from it all. Then they realize they don't have access to all the conveniences of the city. A few more move in, a store or two pop up. Then a few yard lights. Then a few more move in. In 20 years. you find your living in a city again. People tend to reestablish exactly what they moved away from in the first place. It's called progress. I call it @#$#@.
Don't disagree Paul.
But as Carol said, "why does no-one else lives there" is probably what I'm looking for.
We moved to our present home 15 years ago when it was reasonable dark. I've learned that 5+ acres isn't enough. Even our Section NW of Maybell, COisn't enough.

We're hoping to make a "Final Move" that'll last at least 15 years. Hopefully by the time 'progress' moves in on our new location, I'll either have passed on or won't be in any shape to do observing.

Any suggestions for someplace like that?

presalacder

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2018, 01:39:14 PM »
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There's no place like home...
And filters...


Been There! Hoping we can find someplace where 'There's no place like home . . . without filters.'.

John Abreu

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2018, 09:48:22 PM »
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There's no place like home...
And filters...


Been There! Hoping we can find someplace where 'There's no place like home . . . without filters.'.
Tried it without filters.
Now there is 5 kids, 12 grandkid's, and 1 Great Grandson.

Naw, I did try my newest camera without filters, but I actually do get better pictures with my Baader Moon and Sky Glow filter. Just better overall color and resolution. Go Figure?
Every time I've thought I found a "Dark Site" a bunch of buffoons come driving in with their headlights and light bars blazing away, build a big bonfire, try to out do each others stereo's at 250 decibels.
A friend of mine lives in Alberta, Canada. Oh it's nice and dark. But because of smoke and clouds. I post tif files for him to process.

If you look at a night shot of North Korea, it's dark except for the palace. But I wouldn't want to live there.

noneanoncrag

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2018, 11:40:08 PM »
And to address your original title:
Is it me?

If you are the only one in the elevator...
It probably is you.

headsbigwardsubs

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2018, 05:29:15 AM »
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So, where canwe move that still has Bortle 1, Dark Site Finder “Black” skies in the continental US? If not in CONUS, any place that’s within striking distance of the continental US? [Couple hour flight to a major US airport as I don’t do long flights well anymore. ]
We’re considering looking at Eastern Nicaragua. Costa Rica was nice but not any better than a DSF “Blue”.


The only thing you'll find within a 2 hour flight from the US, is an international airport, which means a large city.

A little farther away (one extra connection) is Galapagos islands. Perhaps too remote, but look for "Puerto chino" beach on dark site finder, and imagine that place in the dry season.

That place is in my bucket list for vacations

Terry Payton

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2018, 10:38:40 AM »
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Quote

"somewhere 'warmer' than Montana"

There's going to be trade-offs, no matter where you decide to move. I'm more than happy with my 21.5+ average SQM skies, living in the mountains on 20 acres. And even if you find that "perfect" place, absolutely no guarantees that it will remain pristine; if you find it, so will others, with their light pollution!

Now that's the rub. People move way out to get away from it all. Then they realize they don't have access to all the conveniences of the city. A few more move in, a store or two pop up. Then a few yard lights. Then a few more move in. In 20 years. you find your living in a city again. People tend to reestablish exactly what they moved away from in the first place. It's called progress. I call it @#$#@.
true, so your move is temporary then you move again

edj

Artavius Murphy

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2018, 11:02:00 PM »
Bortle 1 is a sky darker than 21.7 magnitude per square arc-second. There are quite a few places in the lower forty eight states which meet that criterion. There may be low light domes on the horizon but the sky overhead is dark. The Sand Hills of north central Nebraska, site of the Nebraska Star Party, are one example. I suspect the Big Bend area of Texas is another. Tom Clark reports 21.7 at his New Mexico Astronomy Village between Silver City and Deming. Unihedron, manufacturer of the Sky Quality Meter, has a downloadable database of user readings. Several with readings of 21.7 or darker are in the lower forty eight. There are many discussions on CN about finding a place with dark skies to live. Do a search for "Datil" (a village in southwestern New Mexico).

Jason Kaltwasser

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Re: Is it me?
« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2018, 06:18:34 AM »
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Bortle 1 is a sky darker than 21.7 magnitude per square arc-second. There are quite a few places in the lower forty eight states which meet that criterion. There may be low light domes on the horizon but the sky overhead is dark. The Sand Hills of north central Nebraska, site of the Nebraska Star Party, are one example. I suspect the Big Bend area of Texas is another. Tom Clark reports 21.7 at his New Mexico Astronomy Village between Silver City and Deming. Unihedron, manufacturer of the Sky Quality Meter, has a downloadable database of user readings. Several with readings of 21.7 or darker are in the lower forty eight. There are many discussions on CN about finding a place with dark skies to live. Do a search for "Datil" (a village in southwestern New Mexico).

Thanks Kendahl, Great suggestions.
I've been to the Astronomy Village Area and we tried to purchase land in Russian Canyon near Cloudcroft but that didn't work out. I'll look into the Sand Hills area.
I've worked in the Big Bend area of Texas and Morenci, AZ (northeast ofSafford and the Large Binocular Telescope at Mount Graham International Observatory).
You're correct about the low light domes and it being dark overhead. Last time I was in the Datil, NM area there were something like45 homes for sale. We looked at a couple but they didn't have any 'land'. (Typically an acre or less) We may have to revisit the area and just look for land to build on.
Thanks for the suggestion on the Unihedron database, just pulled it up. I'll have to go through it.
Appreciate it, good ideas to research.