Author Topic: Mostly Clear vs Clear  (Read 750 times)

Rick Reiter

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Re: Mostly Clear vs Clear
« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2018, 06:06:07 AM »
Photos aside, the point is that even if you're going after DSO, sky conditions (transparency) can make a big difference, just like seeing with planets. Sometimes, even if there's no "clouds" as such, there is a thin layer of mist or haze that substantially reduces visibility. Similarly, on nights like those dewing also seems to be a bigger problem.

For this reason I try to plan my dark site trips for only the most pristine, transparent nights. As Glenn mentioned, air pollution can be a serious problem with light pollution, so it's extra good if I can observe after a recent storm cleans out the atmosphere. It's all about memorable views for me, and mediocre nights tend to produce mediocre views.

Noty Tarabori

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Re: Mostly Clear vs Clear
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2018, 08:44:31 AM »
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Listen the reason why the first image is more yellow isn't because of a longer exposure I took a longer exposure on the same night as the second photo and it looked like this, clearly the light pollution is tending to less yellow and the reason why the first one is yellow is because there were more clouds I could seeeeeeee them.

Of the images shown in the first post, the first one, with the brown background, showed more stars. One cannot make comments on other images which you did not present.

That dirt, clouds and moisture in the atmosphere degrade the views, especially when light pollution is present, has long been known.