Author Topic: My Street Light Burned Out  (Read 73 times)

Antonio Stanton

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My Street Light Burned Out
« on: December 28, 2017, 01:58:48 AM »
Not that it will change that I'm in a white zone, but MY STREET LIGHT BURNED OUT LAST NIGHT!



Robert Bass

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2017, 02:39:08 AM »
How awful!

propdiagairil

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2017, 02:12:04 AM »
And you expect us to believe that you didn't have anything to do with that?

Bobby Javier

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2017, 12:29:58 PM »
Did it somehow acquire at .22 caliber hole?

Praveen Mac

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2017, 09:40:10 PM »
Don't worry, they will promptly replace it with an LED bulb that is twice as bright and guaranteed to last 15 years.

ecapwaiwa

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2018, 02:54:58 PM »
Well, it may or not make a difference... I have one that I block with a tarp (along with a couple neighbors strings of high brightness "party" lights and so forth because it faces toward the only direction I can point my scope. (N-NE), and I'm pretty sure it gets caught in my optical train through reflections off the top interior portion of the dew shield. Lucky you.

loraderclot

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2018, 08:20:03 PM »
These were installed a bit over a year ago...maybe damage from a recent hail storm (had 2" hailstones).... or maybe focusing my mental powers over it (called wishful thinking) is having an effect.....

Nathan Sorgaard

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2018, 10:05:12 PM »
As I recall, you've previously said you have a corner lot with *three* closely adjacent streetlights. If "your" streetlight burned out, what happened to the other two that don't belong to you?

LED streetlights can be shielded to a far more impressive extent that you might at first suspect - but it's something the utility must do (which many of them now are willing to do, since so many people complain about the intense brightness of unshielded LED streetlights after conversion from sodium-vapor streetlights). At casual glance, the LED streetlight fixtures don't seem to have any readily feasible way for the utility (or anyone else) to attach any sort of shield to it, but I learned that my local utility did have some sort of shield they would install upon request, and so I put my online request in for shielding the LED streetlight at the front corner of our lot. A few days later, the utility replied to my request that they had installed a shield on my light, and since it was daylight I went out to see what the shield looked like but was at first completely stumped - I couldn't see ANYTHING different about the light whatever. However, once night came, I was astonished to see that whereas before the dang thing had lit up my entire front yard and front porch like halogen car headlights - now just four or five feet behind the streetlight, there was an obvious abrupt transition from bright to relatively dark (as good as had been provided by the really well-back-shielded sodium streetlight I had benefitted from for quite a few years). But looking up at the light at night, I could at first see absolutely nothing different about it that could be causing this change. Turns out the "shielding" is done by some rather subtle-looking baffles inset up into the light (i.e they don't protrude at all), which seemingly blend indistinguishably into the light fixture, until you finally spot them and recognize what to look for.

nostcharmacon

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2018, 04:30:32 AM »
Actually had Four street lights, one on each corner. Just the one on my corner burnt out.....hey, since the light burnt out and the house is on the market....maybe they can change the listing to "Astronomer's Paradise"....the only unlit street corner in the city of Denver....just think a patch of less light in the heart of the whitest white zone!

Todd Topcic

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2018, 05:36:59 AM »
I'd settle for mine being out. Right now it alternates 60 seconds on and 65 seconds off. It never varies. At least this time of year it is blocked by leafed out trees.

Rasheed Grayson

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2018, 01:12:51 AM »
Quote
I'd settle for mine being out. Right now it alternates 60 seconds on and 65 seconds off. It never varies. At least this time of year it is blocked by leafed out trees.


You might actually be better-off initiating a request to your utility to fix it - and simultaneously request that they shield it in your direction while they are there accessing the fixture. Barring something unique about the light's circumstances (e.g. you're the only house within a mile of this streetlight) - it's inevitable that sooner or later, someone else in your neighborhood will request it be fixed (or the utility will do so on their own initiative), and you will have lost a sure-fire chance to have the utility get around to shielding the light, rather than putting your request for a second return visit to the light to shield it on the back-burner while they prioritize fixing other lights elsewhere that are malfunctioning. Also, the odds are the utility will get around to "fixing" the light before it goes out entirely- which is of course, your seemingly ideal wish - but even if it does, that's but a very temporary fool's paradise. Barring unique circumstances the utility *will* get around to fixing it, cause that's what electric utility companies do as a core part of their mission. Meanwhile, a light cycling on and off like that is, IMHO actually much more of an impediment to astro observing (and your peace of mind even when you're not) than having it constantly on at night - it's distractingly impossible to adapt to it.

I had a similar situation with the (then) cobra-head, underhanging pyramid lens-style streetlight at the front corner of our house's lot down at Sunset Beach - except in my light's case, it would flicker and then go off for a handful of minutes, and then turn back on for a handful of minutes - the duration of each phase was much more variable than your situation, but always within the single-digits range of minutes. The local utility had back-shielded at my request several years before this began to happen, satisfactory enough to make observing from the top deck of the house enjoyable feasible. As much as I enjoyed the brief intervals when it was "out", on the whole it was more distracting to adapt to when it abruptly turned back on than the brief dark periods were worth. But hoping (like you) that it would go out entirely, I wasn't about to contact the utility. But by next time I visited the beach, someone else had, and it was fixed. Well, the original on-off flickering problem (and utility fix) happened early one summer, and around Thanksgiving, started happening again - and wasn't fixed when I left to go home to Raleigh. Next time I was down at Sunset Beach wasn't until early April the following spring - and the light was fixed, but to my horror the utility had omitted to reinstall the back-shielding (!)

I feared they had deliberately foregone doing so out of suspicion it had somehow contributed to the light's repeated malfunction (overheating?) I nervously called the utility to have the back-shielding reinstalled, and they said they would send someone out within the hour (!!) When the utility repairman arrived at my house, he immediately apologized - he'd forgotten to bring any tinfoil to do the shielding - did I have some? (Holy cow - I never realized before that the "shielding" they did was simply ordinary tinfoil (!) I pulled out the extra-wide extra-thick roll we used for Thanksgiving turkeys and the like, and handed it to him. Since I had him there, I mentioned that I'd seen a handful of the flat-bottom style streetlights out on the island, and presumed those were what they were now replacing the underhanging pyramid-style lights with at the end of their life-cycle; how much would it cost me to have the process accelerated to replace the fixture in front of my house? His answer was: tell you what: I'll do the tinfoil shield for you today, but by next time you come down in 2-3 weeks, I'll replace your fixture with a flat-bottom one. FAR-FREAKING OUT, DUDE! THANK-YOU VERY MUCH! And streetlight happiness, such as it ever is for those of us with an astronomy habit, has reigned ever since down at our house at Sunset Beach. You can't even directly see the light from the front porch, two levels below the observing deck!

MORAL OF STORY: You might just be able to turn this problem around into a positive opportunity. But not if *you* don't take the initiative and instead indulge the futile hope the dang light will burn out entirely and never be fixed.

tioraigenroi

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2018, 11:39:19 PM »
Where there is a will there is a way.  Our club fought to get a street light shielded as it aimed into a park we set up at across the street. This 12"x18" piece of metal is all that separates up to 35 people seeing the sky and not going. The light would light up the whole lot we set up at enough to read the newspaper.
I would like to also add that we still have not truly observed there. We all need to be under solar observing shrouds away from ALL light sourse. And then have a look at the sky.
I plan to observe for the 'first time' there shrouded next week. What a difference!

erenlinra

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2018, 09:14:12 AM »
Quote
Not that it will change that I'm in a white zone, but MY STREET LIGHT BURNED OUT LAST NIGHT!


If I were you I'd get some floods on your house immediately, lest nefarious characters detect the small reduction of lumens and rob you blind!

subhymerlo

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2018, 11:30:04 AM »
A few years ago, all the street lights in my rural county were replaced with full cutoff fixtures. Now whenever a light gets broken, they replace it with the old type that produces glare and sideways light. One step forward, then two steps back. Idiots.

Danny Rodriguez

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Re: My Street Light Burned Out
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2018, 08:53:27 PM »
Quote
A few years ago, all the street lights in my rural county were replaced with full cutoff fixtures. Now whenever a light gets broken, they replace it with the old type that produces glare and sideways light. One step forward, then two steps back. Idiots.

Possibly because the original county-wide replacement choice was made by people at a higher policy-level but the lower-level people at your utility's streetlight-maintenance level lack much practical appreciation of the difference between the two types of fixtures - and when the county-wide replacement was done, the amount of full cutoff fixtures ordered was probably pretty close to the exact number of streetlights in the county, but the maintenance department still had an inventory of the older type fixtures on-hand. And so in part for frugal budgetary reasons, it seems more sensible to the maintenance people to replace broken fixtures with ones already paid-for and in-hand than to spend more $ to order new full-cutoff fixtures.

That's my hypothetical theory from afar knowing nothing more about your actual situation on the ground than you said above, and I'm sticking to it. But amIrite?