Author Topic: New neighbor getting action on LED lights at car dealership.  (Read 345 times)

Chris Jiles

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Re: New neighbor getting action on LED lights at car dealership.
« Reply #30 on: January 30, 2018, 03:51:20 AM »
"(I'll mention that a car dealer tried to sell me a useless repair contract. I pointed out the flaws, left and never returned. Just saying.)"

What has this got to do with lighting or even dealerships? Whenever I buy any electronic equipment from ANY store, they try to push extended warranties on my purchase. It's a lucrative part of any business now.

Ligon Payton

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Re: New neighbor getting action on LED lights at car dealership.
« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2018, 07:06:28 PM »
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"(I'll mention that a car dealer tried to sell me a useless repair contract. I pointed out the flaws, left and never returned. Just saying.)"

What has this got to do with lighting or even dealerships? Whenever I buy any electronic equipment from ANY store, they try to push extended warranties on my purchase. It's a lucrative part of any business now.

It's simply a data point that allows one to form an impression about how likely it might be that a dealership will want to work responsibly with the public on other issues such as light pollution and light trespass.

David Johnson

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Re: New neighbor getting action on LED lights at car dealership.
« Reply #32 on: February 04, 2018, 10:11:43 AM »
I think if they reduced the glare, it would help focus attention on the cars instead of the lights.

Jack Jefferson

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Re: New neighbor getting action on LED lights at car dealership.
« Reply #33 on: February 04, 2018, 01:04:33 PM »
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"(I'll mention that a car dealer tried to sell me a useless repair contract. I pointed out the flaws, left and never returned. Just saying.)"

What has this got to do with lighting or even dealerships? Whenever I buy any electronic equipment from ANY store, they try to push extended warranties on my purchase. It's a lucrative part of any business now.

It's simply a data point that allows one to form an impression about how likely it might be that a dealership will want to work responsibly with the public on other issues such as light pollution and light trespass.
Frankly, I don't see how trying to sell something such as a repair contract to the public has anything to do with working with the public on issues such as LP. I guess I shouldn't shop at Target anymore because of the lighting in their lots, and that they probably refuse to work with the public, because they tried to sell me extended warranties.

Also, as I mentioned previously, it may not be the dealership's call on lighting; rather the manufacturer. You wouldn't believe how much power they have over dealerships, as to the appearance, etc. of the buildings & lots!

Daniel Lacasse

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Re: New neighbor getting action on LED lights at car dealership.
« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2018, 01:18:39 AM »
Quote
Quote

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"(I'll mention that a car dealer tried to sell me a useless repair contract. I pointed out the flaws, left and never returned. Just saying.)"

What has this got to do with lighting or even dealerships? Whenever I buy any electronic equipment from ANY store, they try to push extended warranties on my purchase. It's a lucrative part of any business now.

It's simply a data point that allows one to form an impression about how likely it might be that a dealership will want to work responsibly with the public on other issues such as light pollution and light trespass.
Frankly, I don't see how trying to sell something such as a repair contract to the public has anything to do with working with the public on issues such as LP. I guess I shouldn't shop at Target anymore because of the lighting in their lots, and that they probably refuse to work with the public, because they tried to sell me extended warranties.

Also, as I mentioned previously, it may not be the dealership's call on lighting; rather the manufacturer. You wouldn't believe how much power they have over dealerships, as to the appearance, etc. of the buildings & lots!
It's important to understand what the other person's concerns are in order to find solution that accommodates both parties as much as possible. If we don't care about their problems, why should they care about ours?

Ralph Gleason

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Re: New neighbor getting action on LED lights at car dealership.
« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2018, 06:40:11 AM »
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"The dealership can sell cars during the day and protect inventory with dogs and barbed wire fences at night. No need for excessive light."

Not feasible for dealerships to put up ugly barbed wire fences with dogs around their inventory! Dealerships have their new cars out in front, enclosed by barbed wire would certainly not be inviting, and very well could be against local ordinances, and the manufacturer! I agree about the excessive light, however I mentioned earlier; that may be a requirement from the manufacturer, not the dealer. I do know a little about dealerships; my husband's family has had dealerships since 1919 here, and his dealership is still thriving, operated by his grandson.

Besides, we all have seen what dogs do to car tires....

They chase them.
Now what were you thinking?

Back on track, well sort of... Behind us is a condominium complex. Somebodies juvenile delinquent got beat up outside his condo. Their fix?
Install 2 - 500 watt quartz area lights near the second story roofline, aimed straight out at our homes across the mote (drainage channel) behind our homes.
Well, my wife called city hall about them cutting down all the beautiful Norfolk Island pines and creating the eyesore of exposing their prison-esk complex. Nope, can't do anything about them cutting down their trees.
Then she asked about the bright lights. Turns out they can't have their lighting directly aimed at our properties. We won, She did!
The next day the area fixtures were aimed down at the ground as they should have been.

After the tenant got her first electric bill, the lights were turned off.

So maybe there is some statute about them invading your privacy with their obnoxious lighting? You should have the right to be comfortable in your home.
Most dogs do not chew tires or chase cars, certainly not cars that are PARKED. Maybe they do that on America's Stupidest Animals and Videos but not in real life.

Barbed wire can be an effective crime deterrent and laws forbidding it in commercial districts can be changed. The dealers can then choose to use it or not, depending on how poorly their excessive lights have prevented crime.

The only people who light up their cars with floodlights are car dealers and my neighbor. Our cars are worth as much to us as their cars are to them. One hundred cars in driveways, one hundred cars on the dealer lot. Only a few light polluters.

If the purpose of lights is for "advertising" then one can point out that few people will be interested in it after midnight, but it remains obnoxious to the surrounding community. What the manufacturers want should be unimportant since these are local issues.

(I'll mention that a car dealer tried to sell me a useless repair contract. I pointed out the flaws, left and never returned. Just saying.)

A poorly aimed or unshielded LED can be very damaging to someone else's peaceful enjoyment of property while not being too expensive to leave on all night. That's going to be the big problem from now on.[/quote]
[/quote]
^^^^^^^^^
Sometime during the night, the post to which I responded disappeared. It had something to do with dogs urinating on car tires.

****

The use of dogs and fences is optional. A logical person would assume that cleaning tires is less expensive than repairing dented hoods.

http://www.fox5atlan.../15104554-story

Must have been a slow news day in Carrollton, GA. Dealership has lights, but no fences, no dogs?

If car dealers shine a few more lights onto other peoples property, security will improve?

The vandals need a hobby. Amateur astronomy? No, too much light pollution for that.