Author Topic: Second study I've seen. Reduced lighting does NOT increase crime  (Read 68 times)

Michael Postle

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Re: Second study I've seen. Reduced lighting does NOT increase crime
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2018, 08:04:04 AM »
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I've seen these kinds of studies before. To be brutally honest, I don't believe them.

I'm curious why you don't believe them. I see no particular reason to think that lighting does or doesn't deter crime. And in fact studies are inconclusive -- it depends both on the type of crime and on where the study is done. People's behavior at night varies wildly from one culture to another.

I do have little doubt that for many people -- at least in the U.S. -- lighting does decrease the fear of crime. And since the fear of crime is a much bigger problem than actual crime (which is much rarer than most people like to admit), that's a reasonable argument for lighting at night.

More important, there's overwhelming evidence that lighting decreases pedestrian accidents at night. Which is why I am definitely in favor of appropriate outdoor lighting inside cities. The key word being "appropriate," of course.
Lighting at nightfacilitates crime, because it creates situations where attackers can see their targets while their would be victims are dazzled by glare and cannot see would be attackers. Someone that is being spotlighted at night by streetlights or flood lights is very vulnerable to attack, and the glare can prevent that person from seeing other hazards at night as well while driving. Glare at night from some really badly designed streetlights has interfered with my vision, and I do not have cataracts.There is no doubt this has contributed to accidents too. I am not at all surprised at this because a bright light destroys what little night vision you have at night. In other words, lighting up cities like a prison yard at night will not deter crime. I personally do not light up my home at night, I much rather would be intruders fear what is lurking in the dark, such as my neighbors Great Danes, PitBullsor ME. In other words, never mind the dogs, beware of owner!

Taras

Mike Partoza

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Re: Second study I've seen. Reduced lighting does NOT increase crime
« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2018, 10:12:16 AM »
>In other words, never mind the dogs, beware of owner!

 ....and that's why most "break-in" burglary crimes are committed during the daytime - when the owner is far more likely to be at work or otherwise away. The exception is the break-in were the perp's are not interested in stealing, but in doing harm to the occupants. This sort of break-in is often drug and gang related.

On the other hand, people are greatly concerned with muggings, street robberies,vehicle hijackings,rape, drug activity, gang activity - typical urban street crime that often spills over into shopping mall parking lots or maybe urban college campuses. The police like lights because it allows them to better see such activity from their patrol cars. The history is that such street crime went down when electric street lights were first installed in the late 19th, early 20th century. The question now is: how much lightis enough to allow for proper policing. The fallacy is: brighter is always safer.

I suggest that "crime"as an argument for living withLight Pollution is primarily concerned with the second issue. Home "security lights" are pretty minor contributors to sky glow compared to street and parking lot lights.

subliliva

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Re: Second study I've seen. Reduced lighting does NOT increase crime
« Reply #32 on: February 04, 2018, 12:42:14 PM »
There was a little artical in our local paper that said leaving your lights off inside your home when out deters break-in. We always leave the kitchen and LV room lights on. But it went on to say criminals would rather have them on so they don't have to fumble around in the dark and neighbors could see flash lights triggering suspistion.
They didn't mention outside lights, because its a given around here that they are needed and except for porch lights they are free and the power for them is also free.

settmagganen

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Re: Second study I've seen. Reduced lighting does NOT increase crime
« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2018, 06:03:08 PM »
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There was a little artical in our local paper that said leaving your lights off inside your home when out deters break-in. We always leave the kitchen and LV room lights on. But it went on to say criminals would rather have them on so they don't have to fumble around in the dark and neighbors could see flash lights triggering suspistion.
They didn't mention outside lights, because its a given around here that they are needed and except for porch lights they are free and the power for them is also free.

Did the article say whether criminals are fooled by indoor lights on timers?

Jeff Smith

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Re: Second study I've seen. Reduced lighting does NOT increase crime
« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2018, 09:53:43 AM »
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There was a little artical in our local paper that said leaving your lights off inside your home when out deters break-in. We always leave the kitchen and LV room lights on. But it went on to say criminals would rather have them on so they don't have to fumble around in the dark and neighbors could see flash lights triggering suspistion.
They didn't mention outside lights, because its a given around here that they are needed and except for porch lights they are free and the power for them is also free.
Did the article say whether criminals are fooled by indoor lights on timers?

They said timers are a better choice, but usually they case out a house and know if you're home or not.
BTW, the first place they look inside your home is the top shelf of the master closet, followed by sock drawers. And they almost never look in the garage.