Author Topic: The ultimate light pollution?  (Read 75 times)

handvestlazo

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2018, 07:03:54 AM »
Guys, calm down. It'll be maybe half as bright as the ISS, and as long as you just remember where and when it will pass over it won't ruin your astrophotos.

No one complains about Iridium flares, meteors and the ISS in their photos, how is this any different?

When there's more than 3 of them, then we can complain.

Marvin Alexander

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2018, 04:42:03 PM »
Quote

Except there are at least two more on CN about the same issue with others similarly over-reacting:
http://www.cloudynig...es#entry7083546
http://www.cloudynig...es#entry7092902

<p class="citation">Quote

Insert every post of over-reaction here.
Planes flying over are a brighter and more constant source of LP that this proposed project.
http://www.flightradar24.com
there's a lot more of them. Why don't you panic about this instead?
The skies are only going to get busier with flight traffic.
And then there are are other destructive results:
"If aviation were considered a country, it would rank seventh after Germany in terms of carbon emissions"

Numerous other sats have been launched previously built only for visual detection.....

One thing not mentioned here, is the connection to amateur investment and hand in putting objects into orbit.
http://www.universet...with-a-cubesat/
It's a new trend with many colleges (like ASU) getting involved putting things up there,
even students at a high school in Alexandria, VA have their own satellite.

Most of the time these are things like cubesats that are small and very faint to detect visually.
HAM enthusiast can track their object with radios.
This project is obviously borrowing the concept of crowd funding and a deployed surface like the spacesail:
https://www.kickstar...ling-spacecraft

but with the idea of a kit for enthusiast to put something up there and detect it visually.

Before lots of these in space would be an observation problem, there would be a traffic problem:
https://www.youtube....h?v=jSKL9BBEZ0wRegardless of how bright it is:
its pass will be predictable. (show you can avoid seeing it or imaging it-planes don't give you this luxury)
at 600km, it will fly over pretty quickly, just a tad slower than the ISS.
it will only reflect when the Sun is able to shine on it, so the parts of the night where the Sun is too low below the observer's horizon to reflect on an object at 600km means an invisible pass.
therefore, only just a bit after dusk and just a bit before dawn (normal latitudes) will be when it can be seen, if you're lucky enough for it to pass over you that day.....

Stop over-reacting and use some science and good reasoning!!!!!!

plurcontitear

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2018, 10:27:10 AM »
Quote

Regardless of how bright it is:
its pass will be predictable. (show you can avoid seeing it or imaging it-planes don't give you this luxury)
at 600km, it will fly over pretty quickly, just a tad slower than the ISS.
it will only reflect when the Sun is able to shine on it, so the parts of the night where the Sun is too low below the observer's horizon to reflect on an object at 600km means an invisible pass.
therefore, only just a bit after dusk and just a bit before dawn (normal latitudes) will be when it can be seen, if you're lucky enough for it to pass over you that day.....

Stop over-reacting and use some science and good reasoning!!!!!!

You might wish to read the press releases a little more closely.