Author Topic: The ultimate light pollution?  (Read 1104 times)

Derrick Matlock

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The ultimate light pollution?
« on: December 24, 2017, 12:11:51 AM »
Artificial star to light up the night skies.  http://www.dailymail...arts-Earth.html



Edward Johnston

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2017, 12:00:29 PM »
Ok, some questions:

This is somethingbeing seriously undertaken?

This news site is somewhat of a tabloid in Britain, isn't it?

Does anyone know if there'san international treaty forbidding something like this? If something like this ever does get up there, what's next, panels to reflect sunlight to the Earth 24/7/365 so people don't need night-time?

Wow...

selusmiystag

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2017, 05:37:56 PM »
http://www.scienceal...n-the-night-sky

Edit: that's light pollution inescapablyeverywhere forever.

bayretide

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2017, 12:39:01 AM »
Ever feel that the future shown in Wall-E is coming to fruition?

tersrhythopes

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2018, 08:37:54 PM »
Quote
Ever feel that the future shown in Wall-E is coming to fruition?


This is a clear violation of the Outer Space Treaty of 1967. Are we going to let this happen?

James Przystup

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2018, 11:58:33 AM »
Quote
Ok, some questions:

This is somethingbeing seriously undertaken?

This news site is somewhat of a tabloid in Britain, isn't it?

Does anyone know if there'san international treaty forbidding something like this? If something like this ever does get up there, what's next, panels to reflect sunlight to the Earth 24/7/365 so people don't need night-time?

Wow...

I think that has been proposed before.

laycacdownsell

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2018, 04:58:54 PM »
The prospect of that makes me positively ill.

Davione Boone

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2018, 06:23:50 PM »
Quote
The prospect of that makes me positively ill.


Launch is four months away. Now is the time for everyone tosay something.

isanruptysp

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2018, 03:27:09 AM »
I want to punch the idiots who made this device.

.......

Yay! Now amateur astronomy will be ruined forever!

John Wilson

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2018, 02:22:07 PM »
My oh my. What flippin' idiot dreamed this up?Is there no end to our stupidity? Can this be stopped?

ulpehaco

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2018, 05:24:56 AM »
Quote
My oh my. What flippin' idiot dreamed this up?Is there no end to our stupidity? Can this be stopped?

Quick! Ask the Chinese if they can shoot it down! They have ASATs!

Christian Shim

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2018, 09:31:57 AM »
Two threads about the same issue have been merged.

Personally, I think this is way over hyped. This is going to be 170 sq. ft, ever look as the size of the space station? I have a hard time believing the ISS will not be brighter. The hype on this one is something like the hype a few years ago that Mars was going to be visible the size of the moon. Currently, this is a one time thing to try to get kids interested in science. If it can do that it will be a good thing.

Anthony Cejudo

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2018, 02:45:59 AM »
Anyone else here old enough to remember Echo 1? It was only half the size and (~)round so there were no full-on glints but it was fun to watch and probably got a number of young folks interested in looking up at the sky. (I was already hooked by that time.) I doubt this new project will ruin the sky for astronomy although imagers may lose a few subs. (Hey, the moon just came out for 10 seconds!) In any case, the size to mass ratio will likely mean that it will decay and reenter within a few years similar to Echo which started in a much higher orbit.John

tidutamar

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2018, 10:53:37 PM »
Quote
Two threads about the same issue have been merged.

Personally, I think this is way over hyped. This is going to be 170 sq. ft, ever look as the size of the space station? I have a hard time believing the ISS will not be brighter. The hype on this one is something like the hype a few years ago that Mars was going to be visible the size of the moon. Currently, this is a one time thing to try to get kids interested in science. If it can do that it will be a good thing.


It will be made of Mylar, which is essentially a mirror. It will be in a 600-km-high constant-illumination orbit, and will be able to orientate itself for maximum reflectivity.

The 'Mayak' team leader told methe satellitewill de-orbit after 25 days owing to "aerodynamic drag" but NASA data shows a 600-km orbit lasts years. This person also said the object is to behave like an iridium satellite.

The team has not consulted with the IAU.

I asked more questions about provision for de-orbiting, and post-mission hibernation, and provided the relevant press release, and NASA links, butgot no further response.

Mark Dominguez

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Re: The ultimate light pollution?
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2018, 09:18:56 AM »
Quote
Anyone else here old enough to remember Echo 1? It was only half the size and (~)round so there were no full-on glints but it was fun to watch and probably got a number of young folks interested in looking up at the sky. (I was already hooked by that time.) I doubt this new project will ruin the sky for astronomy although imagers may lose a few subs. (Hey, the moon just came out for 10 seconds!) In any case, the size to mass ratio will likely mean that it will decay and reenter within a few years similar to Echo which started in a much higher orbit.John


Echo 1 was an inflated sphere designed to reflect radio signals.

This Russian design is flat surfaces as reflective of sunlight as possible and under constant illumination.

Was anofficial international proposal made? Nobody knows how bright this will be. It may be in orbit for far longer than the claimed 25 days.

So somethingpossiblyas bright as a gibbous moonin the sky, for years, constantly and inescapably visible,the reason being . . . what? To prove a crowd can fund worldwide inescapable light pollution?