Author Topic: Which number on the scale best correlates with  (Read 182 times)

ramapali

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2018, 03:14:41 PM »
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I think I was a bad observer in VT because there was a ton of stars there, but didn't see the milky way.
Yes, I can't make any sense of that. All I can imagine is that you saw the Milky Way and didn't recognize it. Or perhaps you were never away from light long enough to become dark adapted.Some of the houses near my country home have "security" lights on all the time. Very likely the people who live there have never seen the Milky Way -- though they easily could at the flick of a switch.If you were only there for a few months, it might have to do with the time of year. The summer Milky Way is unmistakable, but the winter Milky Way is much subtler. I can easily imagine somebody overlooking it if they didn't know what to expect. And in spring, the Milky Way lies close to the horizon and is quite hard to see -- especially if the horizon is blocked by trees.Yet another possibility is that your night vision is severely defective. Have you asked your eye doctor about this?<p class="citation">QuoteYeah Hale-Bopp ticked me off because I was reading the papers about all these great observations and didn't see all that much from where I was.[/quote]Again this baffles me, because my wife and mother-in-law, both of whom have quite poor vision, found Hale-Bopp quite impressive from heavily light-polluted surroundings.<p class="citation">QuoteOh well, maybe Ison will be better for me.[/quote]Extremely unlikely. We'll be lucky if ISON ever becomes visible at all to the unaided eye.

Ryan Miller

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2018, 03:30:58 PM »
I don't know about my night vision I don't tend to trip over things when I'm out and about in the dark, I wasn't even aware there was a specific test for it. One possible explanation for the aforementioned mysteries was perhaps I needed glasses a lot earlier than I got them? After getting married in my mid twenties my wife suggested I get my eyes checked, I forget why, and the doctor said my eyes were somewhat weak. I don't have thick glasses, but they're a few levels up from the weakest that are sold.

If you don't mind I have a couple of observation questions somewhat related to this: I hate my glasses so as usual I was being stubborn and observing without them. My wife suggested I try them and see what the difference would be. I can't quite say how many more stars began popping into vision, but I had definitely been missing some. Around 11pm at roughly zenith at 37.5 north I found this beautiful yellow star with glasses on. When I took my glasses back off I couldn't see anything there at all. I'm guessing this star is between Mag 5-6, although it could be as low as 4.5 I'm still learning this stuff. Anyways I'd love to know the name.

As for VT I was well adapted I was hanging out some nights with my girlfriend at the time to watch the August meteor showers, which were a site I hadn't seen before. I doubt my vision was anywhere near as bad as it is now, but it likely wasn't 20/20, but from pics I don't get the impression it is hard to see.

Brian Ross

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #32 on: February 02, 2018, 06:55:36 PM »
Obin, I went out at 10pm your time to do a count under an almost full moon. Without the full moon, I'd say the weather would be ideal. I just did a count of the bright stars that I can see sans glasses rather than take a long time getting dark adapted and all that. I counted a 102 stars. Not great, but not awful considering it's still early here. I can only barely see delphinus tonight and probably wouldn't have recognized it at all if I hadn't known where to look for it. I also found I think another one which looks either like a W or an M and is getting close to zenith. It's a pretty big one, much bigger than delphinus.

kondcongrese

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #33 on: February 02, 2018, 07:20:44 PM »
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One possible explanation for the aforementioned mysteries was perhaps I needed glasses a lot earlier than I got them?

No, that wouldn't explain it. Glasses make a huge difference for the visibility of stars, which are point sources. But I'm pretty myopic, and I can see the Milky Way equally well with or without glasses. It's huge and fuzzy either way.

<p class="citation">QuoteAround 11pm at roughly zenith at 37.5 north I found this beautiful yellow star with glasses on. When I took my glasses back off I couldn't see anything there at all. I'm guessing this star is between Mag 5-6, although it could be as low as 4.5 I'm still learning this stuff.[/quote]

Impossible to guess. The star -- or whatever it was -- was surely brighter than mag 4.5, otherwise it wouldn't have stimulated color vision. (Mag 5 and 6 are fainter than mag 4.5.) But there are so many reasonably bright yellowish stars that I wouldn't even venture to guess.

Quite likely it was something ephemeral -- an airplane or satellite, or possibly even a head-on meteor.

<p class="citation">QuoteAs for VT I was well adapted I was hanging out some nights with my girlfriend at the time to watch the August meteor showers.[/quote]

OK, now I'm really baffled! How you can fail to see the Milky Way when you're observing the Perseids from a dark site is a mystery to me. No doubt you saw it but didn't notice it.

sainomaters

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #34 on: February 02, 2018, 10:28:20 PM »
Maybe my mind was on other beauties.....The yellow/orange star I'm seeing is definitely a star I've seen it multiple times with glasses now, same location. I can rule out Betelgeuse and mars, but that's about it, I need to get some of these books soon.

teirazaro

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #35 on: February 02, 2018, 11:58:49 PM »
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The yellow/orange star I'm seeing is definitely a star I've seen it multiple times with glasses now, same location. I can rule out Betelgeuse and mars, but that's about it.

Okay, I was thrown off by your talk of magnitudes. Mag 5 and 6 are very faint, and mag 4.5 is barely visible in a typical suburb. If it's a star that could be mentioned in the same sentence with Betelgeuse -- and appear yellow -- it must be much, much brighter, around magnitude 1 or even 0.

I'm going to take a wild guess and say that the star was actually Capella, even though that's less than halfway up the sky at 11 p.m.

Tommy Schmidt

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #36 on: February 03, 2018, 07:34:46 AM »
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Obin, I went out at 10pm your time to do a count under an almost full moon. Without the full moon, I'd say the weather would be ideal. I just did a count of the bright stars that I can see sans glasses rather than take a long time getting dark adapted and all that. I counted a 102 stars. Not great, but not awful considering it's still early here. I can only barely see delphinus tonight and probably wouldn't have recognized it at all if I hadn't known where to look for it. I also found I think another one which looks either like a W or an M and is getting close to zenith. It's a pretty big one, much bigger than delphinus.

You might actually have better skies than I do! This morning it is cloudy so I took a photo at 6AM (about an hour before sunrise) of the sky to give you an idea of the sky glow and light pollution.

This is a 1/2 second photo taken with my point-and-shoot camera. These are lights which are about 1km away reflecting off the clouds. These lights are on from before sunset until after sunrise every day of the year. This is the kind of excessive light pollution I have to deal with here.

obin 

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tenpaseper

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #37 on: February 08, 2018, 09:44:11 PM »
Yuck, that's what we deal with here to about 30 degrees up the horizon I'd guesttimate and at times its even worse. I'd say the first 30 degrees are washed out of all but magnitude 1 maybe 2 if I'm being generous, basically the heavy hitters like sirius, betelgeuse and the like are the only ones that really cut through.Wonder if you could help me with something...I'm looking at two telescopes currently one is an 8" celestron SE with no accesories and the cheap stand (I understand it isn't great anyways) and the other is the 9.25 xlt with a strong tripod and several different lenses, laser collimator the basic accesories essentially. I can get the 8se for 1400 shipped or the 9.25 xlt for 2100 shipped. I've decided I'm not going to factor in weight, hopefully a heavy telescope will bulk me up. Neither would be a grab and go.I'll take a look at the sky here later if you're interested at all, I think it may have clouded over though.

Aaron Maggot

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Re: Which number on the scale best correlates with
« Reply #38 on: February 09, 2018, 01:32:18 AM »
Tony,

I located Capella at about exactly where you described it, so it definitely wasn't the one I was referring to. It's not a standout star like Capella or Betelgeuse at all, it's actually hard to see (from here anyway) but it's got this beautiful yellow color to it. I can see several reddish stars but this is the only yellow one. Wish I had a more unobstructed view here and could see more constellations and unfortunately I have a piece of garbage chromebook which won't let me download stellarium.