Author Topic: Tak Teegul Lapides  (Read 393 times)

rennlispuring

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Re: Tak Teegul Lapides
« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2018, 03:51:33 AM »
Yeah, I know. I think I'll just stick with my DM-6, UA Unistar, and Stellarvue M1 for now (written in order from most robust to lightest).

firorectve

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Re: Tak Teegul Lapides
« Reply #16 on: February 04, 2018, 01:04:35 PM »
I don't want to hijack this thread, but do want to emphasize the importance of slo-mo controls (standard with the Teegul) in certain circumstances:
I regularly run 235x on this Terabeam (Meade ETX125) and the super-short tube would be difficult for me to track objects without slo-mo. The Voyager handles this task on the Quickset Samson tripod with almost zero vibration, and the fully dressed rig with eyepieces in the tray and 2" diagonal, weighs 27lbs.

With a longer OTA, slo-mo controls become less necessary, but at the expense of vibration due to wind or operator contact. The only way around it is to get a bigger mount. So in effect, slo-mo controls can reduce the size of a mount needed.


Daniel Lacasse

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Re: Tak Teegul Lapides
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2018, 02:31:37 PM »
Quote
Getting back to the Teegul........

I was looking at the Lapides mod, and it occurred to me that the black machined hub covers the bolts that enable adjustment of the worm meshing on the azimuth axis. I've never seen a Teegul, so am unfamiliar with how the worm meshing adjustment is made. For the altitude axis, I presume that the name cap pops off exposing the adjustment mechanism.

On the Voyager, adjustment is made via the 3 screws (seen in my photos above) on each axis that the factory advises users to "not touch".  In reality, users can adjust Voyager meshing via these 3 screws, but at first it does seem counter-intuitive and requires patience to understand how it all works. After the process has been mastered, meshing takes less than a minute to adjust for minimal backlash and binding. The process is the same for both azimuth and altitude axes.

How does one adjust worm meshing on the azimuth axis of a Teegul Lapides?

Does anyone have any clarification on this -- specifically how to open the Teegul Lapides to adjust the tightness on each axis?

Woody Boelkens

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Re: Tak Teegul Lapides
« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2018, 02:16:21 AM »
Note the similarity between the AstroTech Voyager and the Teegul. I suspect the AT is a clone. If so, there are several excellent threads here on CN mounts section on stripping and exposing the guts of the Voyager. I don't really know, I've never seen a Teegul, but it might be a good place to start.

Christopher Buchanan

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Re: Tak Teegul Lapides
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2018, 03:48:13 AM »
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I've been thinking about getting one of these for my FS-60Q, as it looks like the perfect g&g mount for a scope of that size. On the pictures that I've seen, it looks like the scope is designed to be mounted on the left in order for the slo-mo knobs to be accessible on the front of the mount (see the image below). I really prefer having my scope on the right side of an alt-az mount. Do any of you know if there's a way to adjust the mount so that I can have my scope on the right and keep the slo-mo controls in front? From the pics I've seen it doesn't appear to me that that's possible, but I just thought I'd check.

950523-1.jpg

Can you pull the worm out and flip it around?