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Reflectors Telescopes Forum / Re: Collimation Perfect Except for One Thing
« Last post by Theodore Inlaw on February 09, 2018, 10:47:23 AM »
FWIW, I quickly learned to ignore the secondary center spot that I had dutifully placed on the mirror per the instructions. Eventually, after many years I used some solvent to remove the spot. The spot was just in the way/confusing as others have mentioned above.
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Reflectors Telescopes Forum / Re: Help with my LB 12"
« Last post by nalchsilnighnul on February 09, 2018, 10:46:44 AM »
i second getting the Howie Glatter tools. i keep using my Orion Lasermate Deluxe II
but i can never get it as good as a friend can with his HG. i guess i need to quit being
a cheapskate and get my own set
good luck! jim
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Beginners Forum / Re: An update to Burnham's? Whaddaya say?
« Last post by renjaysunsdis on February 09, 2018, 10:46:32 AM »
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Although his work is somewhat dated, and as noted, behind the times regarding type fonts and photography, I still enjoy using Burnham's, because it is a classic, and because it still is a very useful work.

Since I expect the photography was state of the art when it was printed, I value the comparison with the photos I make in my own backyard with a 4" scope and a DSLR.
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I don't know if you've done any looking but here is a good explanation:

http://garyseronik.c...nian-secondary/
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Can I assume you tried the advice here?
 http://www.esp8266.c...php?f=32&t=8855
mconsidine
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Eyepieces Questions & Recommendations / Re: Cleaning EP
« Last post by Zac Purvis on February 09, 2018, 10:44:26 AM »
Personally I only use distilled water on soft paper handkerchief, or on cotton swab, it removes all traces of grease and dust, but I'll try Purosol one day.
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Eyepieces Questions & Recommendations / Re: Eyepiece center image quality
« Last post by olaralal on February 09, 2018, 10:43:47 AM »
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I haven't found anything better than my Pentax XO and TMB SMC orthos for on axis. However, neither has great eye relief, and certainly aren't cheap.
Eye relief is easier if you have a great barlow, too. For instance, the TMB 1.8 barlow on a 12mm will give you basically a 6mm with better eye relief.

What most people don't think about when you're dealing with ~30 deg AFOV eps is that they're a pain in the butt to use. A tracking mount is pretty much required, and then focusing can be an issue where you need to go look at something bright to focus properly, then slew back to the dim thing you were looking at before... and hope your gotos are good enough to keep the little dim thing in that tiny AFOV at high magnifications.
I have some experience with that too.
I've used a 5mm kasai ortho in the past with a manual mount and I couldn't wait to get a motor driven mount!
I don't have Goto but I have a dual axis drive. I enjoy observing way more than before, but I wouldn't want to go back to 42 degrees if I can avoid it.
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Beginners Forum / Re: Stay warm forever, clothing for the winter astronomer.
« Last post by lolusthoumin on February 09, 2018, 10:43:29 AM »
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Hey guys, I recently got into astronomy and the one thing that kept cutting my sessions short was the extreme cold we’ve been facing lately. Well, extreme for a California boy who lives in a desert.

Last week it hovered around 20 degrees all night with some wind and in that kind of weather it’s tough to get anything done. But I’ve found a solution. My folks used to work back on the farm in Minnesota so one of the first things they would do before going outside was to throw on a pair of insulated coveralls.

Be the envy of your astronomy friends by looking exactly like Dr. Venture, and as an added benefit it’s hard to use the restroom!
Seriously though. Duluth Trading Company and Dickies both make these. You can get them with arms or without. Links coming down. Here and Here.
Of course they don't have to be Dickies or Duluths but they are well known clothing companies that don't skimp on making quality outerwear.
I know you guys back east have been seeing unseasonably warm temperatures, but believe me it'll get cold for you too, and you'll be happier with a pair on when it does get cold. You can literally throw these things on in seconds and I've found them to be extremely nice and warm.
Another thing I've found, that is immensely better than cutting a fingertip off your gloves are these, here.
These allow you to use your smartphones, which are becoming an increasingly necessary item with go-to scopes with amateurs, as well as being a handy reference for people with more expertise. Or a means of controlling your entire telescope as with the Celestron Evo's.
By the way, if you're operating a cellphone at a black sight, you'll blow up your eyes looking at the screen, but many apps now transform your cellphone into a nightime red light. Here is one.

Use this thread to discuss the nice and the necessary things you have to do in order to be observing in these winter months. Remember never to operate below your telescope, or your electronics', temperature limit.
I wouldn't be afraid to wear one to a star party. ****, let them freeze! I've got scienceing to do!
Hey! Just move to Long Island, NY! Record- breaking temps! T-shirt weather, and it's Christmas time! Love it! Can't view the Heavens for the clouds and fog, but NO SNOW!!!!
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Reflectors Telescopes Forum / Re: Largest dream scope?
« Last post by smalmonica on February 09, 2018, 10:43:02 AM »
With 30" + scopes, I'd definitely prefer the Nasmyth configuration - so much more comfortable to use!
4.3 inch eyepieces are commercially available. A 32" F/10 would yield a 0.6 degree TFOV.Attached Thumbnails

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Jupiter with its endlessly changing cloud features, lunar transits, occultations etc. Its a never ending feast for the eyes.
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